Decomposition of jellyfish carrion in situ

Short-term impacts on infauna, benthic nutrient fluxes and sediment redox conditions

Ariella Chelsky*, Kylie A. Pitt, Angus J.P. Ferguson, William W. Bennett, Peter R. Teasdale, David T. Welsh

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Jellyfish often form blooms that persist for weeks to months before they collapse en masse, resulting in the sudden release of large amounts of organic matter to the environment. This study investigated the biogeochemical and ecological effects of the decomposition of jellyfish in a shallow coastal lagoon in New South Wales, Australia. Catostylus mosaicus carrion was added to the surface of shallow sub-tidal sediments and biogeochemical parameters and macrofaunal abundance immediately below the jellyfish carrion were measured over three days. Sediment plots without jellyfish served as controls. Sediment oxygen demand and carbon and nitrogen efflux increased by up to 60-fold in the jellyfish plots, compared to control plots, and dissolved organic nutrient fluxes were more sustained than in previous studies due to the use of fresh rather than frozen biomass. The decomposing jellyfish progressively altered sediment redox conditions, indicated by an increase in porewater iron (II) and sulfide concentrations measured by high-resolution in situ diffusive samplers. Abundance of some macrofaunal taxa in the jellyfish plots decreased relative to controls, however, the abundance of a carnivorous gastropod, which was presumably feeding on the carrion, increased in the jellyfish plots. While jellyfish carrion may be a food source for some macrofauna, low oxygen conditions coupled with the accumulation of toxic dissolved sulfides in the near-surface sediments may explain the overall change in the macroinfaunal community.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftScience of the Total Environment
Vol/bind566-567
Sider (fra-til)929-937
ISSN0048-9697
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. okt. 2016
Udgivet eksterntJa

Fingeraftryk

benthic infauna
carrion
jellyfish
redox conditions
Nutrients
Sediments
decomposition
Fluxes
Decomposition
nutrient
sediment
Sulfides
Poisons
Biological materials
sulfide
Biomass
Nitrogen
Carbon
Iron
in situ

Citer dette

Chelsky, Ariella ; Pitt, Kylie A. ; Ferguson, Angus J.P. ; Bennett, William W. ; Teasdale, Peter R. ; Welsh, David T. / Decomposition of jellyfish carrion in situ : Short-term impacts on infauna, benthic nutrient fluxes and sediment redox conditions. I: Science of the Total Environment. 2016 ; Bind 566-567. s. 929-937.
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abstract = "Jellyfish often form blooms that persist for weeks to months before they collapse en masse, resulting in the sudden release of large amounts of organic matter to the environment. This study investigated the biogeochemical and ecological effects of the decomposition of jellyfish in a shallow coastal lagoon in New South Wales, Australia. Catostylus mosaicus carrion was added to the surface of shallow sub-tidal sediments and biogeochemical parameters and macrofaunal abundance immediately below the jellyfish carrion were measured over three days. Sediment plots without jellyfish served as controls. Sediment oxygen demand and carbon and nitrogen efflux increased by up to 60-fold in the jellyfish plots, compared to control plots, and dissolved organic nutrient fluxes were more sustained than in previous studies due to the use of fresh rather than frozen biomass. The decomposing jellyfish progressively altered sediment redox conditions, indicated by an increase in porewater iron (II) and sulfide concentrations measured by high-resolution in situ diffusive samplers. Abundance of some macrofaunal taxa in the jellyfish plots decreased relative to controls, however, the abundance of a carnivorous gastropod, which was presumably feeding on the carrion, increased in the jellyfish plots. While jellyfish carrion may be a food source for some macrofauna, low oxygen conditions coupled with the accumulation of toxic dissolved sulfides in the near-surface sediments may explain the overall change in the macroinfaunal community.",
keywords = "Bacterial decomposition, Benthic macrofauna, Diffusive equilibration in thin films (DET), Diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT), Gelatinous zooplankton, Remineralization",
author = "Ariella Chelsky and Pitt, {Kylie A.} and Ferguson, {Angus J.P.} and Bennett, {William W.} and Teasdale, {Peter R.} and Welsh, {David T.}",
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journal = "Science of the Total Environment",
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Decomposition of jellyfish carrion in situ : Short-term impacts on infauna, benthic nutrient fluxes and sediment redox conditions. / Chelsky, Ariella; Pitt, Kylie A.; Ferguson, Angus J.P.; Bennett, William W.; Teasdale, Peter R.; Welsh, David T.

I: Science of the Total Environment, Bind 566-567, 01.10.2016, s. 929-937.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Decomposition of jellyfish carrion in situ

T2 - Short-term impacts on infauna, benthic nutrient fluxes and sediment redox conditions

AU - Chelsky, Ariella

AU - Pitt, Kylie A.

AU - Ferguson, Angus J.P.

AU - Bennett, William W.

AU - Teasdale, Peter R.

AU - Welsh, David T.

PY - 2016/10/1

Y1 - 2016/10/1

N2 - Jellyfish often form blooms that persist for weeks to months before they collapse en masse, resulting in the sudden release of large amounts of organic matter to the environment. This study investigated the biogeochemical and ecological effects of the decomposition of jellyfish in a shallow coastal lagoon in New South Wales, Australia. Catostylus mosaicus carrion was added to the surface of shallow sub-tidal sediments and biogeochemical parameters and macrofaunal abundance immediately below the jellyfish carrion were measured over three days. Sediment plots without jellyfish served as controls. Sediment oxygen demand and carbon and nitrogen efflux increased by up to 60-fold in the jellyfish plots, compared to control plots, and dissolved organic nutrient fluxes were more sustained than in previous studies due to the use of fresh rather than frozen biomass. The decomposing jellyfish progressively altered sediment redox conditions, indicated by an increase in porewater iron (II) and sulfide concentrations measured by high-resolution in situ diffusive samplers. Abundance of some macrofaunal taxa in the jellyfish plots decreased relative to controls, however, the abundance of a carnivorous gastropod, which was presumably feeding on the carrion, increased in the jellyfish plots. While jellyfish carrion may be a food source for some macrofauna, low oxygen conditions coupled with the accumulation of toxic dissolved sulfides in the near-surface sediments may explain the overall change in the macroinfaunal community.

AB - Jellyfish often form blooms that persist for weeks to months before they collapse en masse, resulting in the sudden release of large amounts of organic matter to the environment. This study investigated the biogeochemical and ecological effects of the decomposition of jellyfish in a shallow coastal lagoon in New South Wales, Australia. Catostylus mosaicus carrion was added to the surface of shallow sub-tidal sediments and biogeochemical parameters and macrofaunal abundance immediately below the jellyfish carrion were measured over three days. Sediment plots without jellyfish served as controls. Sediment oxygen demand and carbon and nitrogen efflux increased by up to 60-fold in the jellyfish plots, compared to control plots, and dissolved organic nutrient fluxes were more sustained than in previous studies due to the use of fresh rather than frozen biomass. The decomposing jellyfish progressively altered sediment redox conditions, indicated by an increase in porewater iron (II) and sulfide concentrations measured by high-resolution in situ diffusive samplers. Abundance of some macrofaunal taxa in the jellyfish plots decreased relative to controls, however, the abundance of a carnivorous gastropod, which was presumably feeding on the carrion, increased in the jellyfish plots. While jellyfish carrion may be a food source for some macrofauna, low oxygen conditions coupled with the accumulation of toxic dissolved sulfides in the near-surface sediments may explain the overall change in the macroinfaunal community.

KW - Bacterial decomposition

KW - Benthic macrofauna

KW - Diffusive equilibration in thin films (DET)

KW - Diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT)

KW - Gelatinous zooplankton

KW - Remineralization

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84989807955&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.05.011

DO - 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.05.011

M3 - Journal article

VL - 566-567

SP - 929

EP - 937

JO - Science of the Total Environment

JF - Science of the Total Environment

SN - 0048-9697

ER -