Curbing the Resource Curse

Mongolian Democracy’s Associational Ally

Michael Aagaard Seeberg

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Mongolia has had an unbroken record of democratic rule for a quarter of acentury, but natural resources loom to curse its promising political pathway.Natural resources have cursed more than a handful of fledgling democraciesin the post-Cold War era, but not Mongolia. Despite neighboring China andRussia’s unquenchable thirst for exploitable resources, democracy remains theonly game in town in Mongolia. Abundant scholarship on the resource cursesays surprisingly little about factors that condition low-income democracies’drowning in resource affluence. This essay argues that Mongolia sustainsdemocracy thanks to at least one political-institutional factor: a vigorouscivil society that perseveringly checks and monitors state power, pushes backagainst powerful economic interests, articulates and presses social demandsof underprivileged groups in society, and, not least, aids the state. Theanalysis shows the variety of weapons that civil society uses to champion anopen polity, keep citizens on notice, and tie the hands of powerful economicinterests. Skillfully applying these means, civil society has been key to makingMongolia punch above its weight politically, economically, and in terms ofsocial welfare provision for a quarter of a century.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftTaiwan Journal of Democracy
Vol/bind14
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)127-150
ISSN1815-7238
StatusUdgivet - dec. 2018

Fingeraftryk

Mongolia
allies
resources
civil society
natural resources
affluence
institutional factors
weapon
cold war
low income
town
welfare
democracy
citizen
China
economics
Group
Society

Citer dette

Aagaard Seeberg, Michael. / Curbing the Resource Curse : Mongolian Democracy’s Associational Ally. I: Taiwan Journal of Democracy. 2018 ; Bind 14, Nr. 2. s. 127-150.
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Curbing the Resource Curse : Mongolian Democracy’s Associational Ally. / Aagaard Seeberg, Michael.

I: Taiwan Journal of Democracy, Bind 14, Nr. 2, 12.2018, s. 127-150.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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