Cultural change and mental health in Greenland

The association of childhood conditions, language, and urbanization with mental health and suicidal thoughts among the Inuit of Greenland

Greenland Population Study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2002-Jan
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftSocial Science & Medicine
Vol/bind54
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)33-48
Antal sider15
ISSN0277-9536
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. jan. 2002

Fingeraftryk

Greenland
Urbanization
cultural change
urbanization
Mental Health
Language
mental health
childhood
language
Denmark
migrant
sociocultural development
Inuits
socioeconomic factors
population group
statistical method
health
contagious disease
Health Surveys
Occupations

Citer dette

@article{e21ec000c6b111dda428000ea68e967b,
title = "Cultural change and mental health in Greenland: The association of childhood conditions, language, and urbanization with mental health and suicidal thoughts among the Inuit of Greenland",
abstract = "In Greenland, the rapid sociocultural change of the last 50 years has been paralleled by an epidemiological transition characterized by a reduction in infectious diseases, an increase in cancer and cardiovascular diseases, and an increased prevalence of mental health problems. During 1993-94 and 1997-98, two health interview surveys were conducted among Inuit in Greenland and Inuit migrants in Denmark. The response rates were 71 and 55{\%}. Information on mental health was obtained from 1388 and 1769 adults. As indicators of mental health, the prevalence of potential psychiatric cases according to the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) and the prevalence of suicidal thoughts were studied in relation to childhood residence and father's occupation, current residence, and language. The statistical methods included logistic regression and graphical independence models. The results indicated a U-shaped association in Greenland of GHQ-cases with age and a high prevalence of suicidal thoughts among young people; a low prevalence of GHQ-cases among those who were bilingual or spoke only Danish; and a high prevalence of suicidal thoughts among migrants who grew up in Denmark and among residents of the capital of Greenland. In Greenland, women were more often GHQ-cases and had suicidal thoughts more often than men. The association between language and GHQ-cases is presumed to operate through socioeconomic factors. It is necessary to modify the common notion that rapid societal development is in itself a cause of poor mental health: as a result of successful integration into the modern Greenlandic society, some population groups have better mental health compared to other groups.",
keywords = "Acculturation, Adolescent, Adult, Cohort Studies, Denmark, Female, Greenland, Health Care Surveys, Health Status Indicators, Humans, Inuits, Language, Male, Mental Disorders, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Questionnaires, Residence Characteristics, Social Change, Suicide, Urbanization",
author = "Peter Bjerregaard and Tine Curtis and Greenland, {Population Study} and {Greenland Population Study} and Ulrik Becker",
year = "2002",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0277-9536(01)00005-3",
language = "English",
volume = "54",
pages = "33--48",
journal = "Social Science & Medicine",
issn = "0277-9536",
publisher = "Pergamon Press",
number = "1",

}

Cultural change and mental health in Greenland : The association of childhood conditions, language, and urbanization with mental health and suicidal thoughts among the Inuit of Greenland. / Greenland Population Study.

I: Social Science & Medicine, Bind 54, Nr. 1, 01.01.2002, s. 33-48.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cultural change and mental health in Greenland

T2 - The association of childhood conditions, language, and urbanization with mental health and suicidal thoughts among the Inuit of Greenland

AU - Bjerregaard, Peter

AU - Curtis, Tine

AU - Greenland, Population Study

AU - Greenland Population Study

A2 - Becker, Ulrik

PY - 2002/1/1

Y1 - 2002/1/1

N2 - In Greenland, the rapid sociocultural change of the last 50 years has been paralleled by an epidemiological transition characterized by a reduction in infectious diseases, an increase in cancer and cardiovascular diseases, and an increased prevalence of mental health problems. During 1993-94 and 1997-98, two health interview surveys were conducted among Inuit in Greenland and Inuit migrants in Denmark. The response rates were 71 and 55%. Information on mental health was obtained from 1388 and 1769 adults. As indicators of mental health, the prevalence of potential psychiatric cases according to the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) and the prevalence of suicidal thoughts were studied in relation to childhood residence and father's occupation, current residence, and language. The statistical methods included logistic regression and graphical independence models. The results indicated a U-shaped association in Greenland of GHQ-cases with age and a high prevalence of suicidal thoughts among young people; a low prevalence of GHQ-cases among those who were bilingual or spoke only Danish; and a high prevalence of suicidal thoughts among migrants who grew up in Denmark and among residents of the capital of Greenland. In Greenland, women were more often GHQ-cases and had suicidal thoughts more often than men. The association between language and GHQ-cases is presumed to operate through socioeconomic factors. It is necessary to modify the common notion that rapid societal development is in itself a cause of poor mental health: as a result of successful integration into the modern Greenlandic society, some population groups have better mental health compared to other groups.

AB - In Greenland, the rapid sociocultural change of the last 50 years has been paralleled by an epidemiological transition characterized by a reduction in infectious diseases, an increase in cancer and cardiovascular diseases, and an increased prevalence of mental health problems. During 1993-94 and 1997-98, two health interview surveys were conducted among Inuit in Greenland and Inuit migrants in Denmark. The response rates were 71 and 55%. Information on mental health was obtained from 1388 and 1769 adults. As indicators of mental health, the prevalence of potential psychiatric cases according to the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) and the prevalence of suicidal thoughts were studied in relation to childhood residence and father's occupation, current residence, and language. The statistical methods included logistic regression and graphical independence models. The results indicated a U-shaped association in Greenland of GHQ-cases with age and a high prevalence of suicidal thoughts among young people; a low prevalence of GHQ-cases among those who were bilingual or spoke only Danish; and a high prevalence of suicidal thoughts among migrants who grew up in Denmark and among residents of the capital of Greenland. In Greenland, women were more often GHQ-cases and had suicidal thoughts more often than men. The association between language and GHQ-cases is presumed to operate through socioeconomic factors. It is necessary to modify the common notion that rapid societal development is in itself a cause of poor mental health: as a result of successful integration into the modern Greenlandic society, some population groups have better mental health compared to other groups.

KW - Acculturation

KW - Adolescent

KW - Adult

KW - Cohort Studies

KW - Denmark

KW - Female

KW - Greenland

KW - Health Care Surveys

KW - Health Status Indicators

KW - Humans

KW - Inuits

KW - Language

KW - Male

KW - Mental Disorders

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Prevalence

KW - Questionnaires

KW - Residence Characteristics

KW - Social Change

KW - Suicide

KW - Urbanization

U2 - 10.1016/S0277-9536(01)00005-3

DO - 10.1016/S0277-9536(01)00005-3

M3 - Journal article

VL - 54

SP - 33

EP - 48

JO - Social Science & Medicine

JF - Social Science & Medicine

SN - 0277-9536

IS - 1

ER -