Cross-reactivity to fish and chicken meat - a new clinical syndrome

A Kuehn, F Codreanu-Morel, C Lehners-Weber, V Doyen, S-A Gomez-André, F Bienvenu, J Fischer, N Ballardini, M van Hage, J-M Perotin, S Silcret-Grieu, H Chabane, François Hentges, M Ollert, Christiane Hilger, Martine Morisset

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: Fish is one of the most allergenic foods. While clinical cross-reactivity among different fishes is a widely accepted feature of fish allergy, associations with other food allergies are not well understood. This study aims at analyzing the relevance of clinical cross-reactivity between fish and chicken meat in patients with allergy to chicken meat without sensitization to hen's eggs.

METHODS: Patients with food allergy to fish and chicken meat (n = 29) or chicken meat only (n = 7) were recruited. IgE-reactive chicken proteins were identified (Edman, MS analysis) and quantified (ELISA). Allergens were used in IgE ELISA and skin testing.

RESULTS: Chicken parvalbumin and two new allergens, aldolase and enolase, were identified at 12, 40, and 50 kDa, respectively. They were recognized by sIgE of 61%, 75%, and 83% of all patient sera which were in the majority of the cases positive for the fish homologues as well. Fish and chicken meat allergens were highly cross-reactive while high inhibition rates with fish or chicken allergens correlated with the patients' primary sensitization to fish or chicken. In cooked or roasted foods, enolase and aldolase were detectable in chicken breast while parvalbumin was detectable in chicken legs and wings.

CONCLUSIONS: Fish and chicken meat are cross-reactive foods; both fish-allergic and chicken meat-allergic patients might be at risk of developing a food allergy to chicken meat or to fish, respectively. This clinical phenomenon is proposed to be termed 'fish-chicken syndrome' with cross-reactive allergens involved being parvalbumins, enolases, and aldolases.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAllergy
Vol/bind71
Udgave nummer12
Sider (fra-til)1772-1781
ISSN0105-4538
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2016

Fingeraftryk

Meat
Chickens
Fishes
Allergens
Parvalbumins
Food Hypersensitivity
Phosphopyruvate Hydratase
Fructose-Bisphosphate Aldolase
Food
Hypersensitivity
Aldehyde-Lyases
Eggs
Leg

Citer dette

Kuehn, A., Codreanu-Morel, F., Lehners-Weber, C., Doyen, V., Gomez-André, S-A., Bienvenu, F., ... Morisset, M. (2016). Cross-reactivity to fish and chicken meat - a new clinical syndrome. Allergy, 71(12), 1772-1781. https://doi.org/10.1111/all.12968
Kuehn, A ; Codreanu-Morel, F ; Lehners-Weber, C ; Doyen, V ; Gomez-André, S-A ; Bienvenu, F ; Fischer, J ; Ballardini, N ; van Hage, M ; Perotin, J-M ; Silcret-Grieu, S ; Chabane, H ; Hentges, François ; Ollert, M ; Hilger, Christiane ; Morisset, Martine. / Cross-reactivity to fish and chicken meat - a new clinical syndrome. I: Allergy. 2016 ; Bind 71, Nr. 12. s. 1772-1781.
@article{d4b99209825446329e702da3e0244f2a,
title = "Cross-reactivity to fish and chicken meat - a new clinical syndrome",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Fish is one of the most allergenic foods. While clinical cross-reactivity among different fishes is a widely accepted feature of fish allergy, associations with other food allergies are not well understood. This study aims at analyzing the relevance of clinical cross-reactivity between fish and chicken meat in patients with allergy to chicken meat without sensitization to hen's eggs.METHODS: Patients with food allergy to fish and chicken meat (n = 29) or chicken meat only (n = 7) were recruited. IgE-reactive chicken proteins were identified (Edman, MS analysis) and quantified (ELISA). Allergens were used in IgE ELISA and skin testing.RESULTS: Chicken parvalbumin and two new allergens, aldolase and enolase, were identified at 12, 40, and 50 kDa, respectively. They were recognized by sIgE of 61{\%}, 75{\%}, and 83{\%} of all patient sera which were in the majority of the cases positive for the fish homologues as well. Fish and chicken meat allergens were highly cross-reactive while high inhibition rates with fish or chicken allergens correlated with the patients' primary sensitization to fish or chicken. In cooked or roasted foods, enolase and aldolase were detectable in chicken breast while parvalbumin was detectable in chicken legs and wings.CONCLUSIONS: Fish and chicken meat are cross-reactive foods; both fish-allergic and chicken meat-allergic patients might be at risk of developing a food allergy to chicken meat or to fish, respectively. This clinical phenomenon is proposed to be termed 'fish-chicken syndrome' with cross-reactive allergens involved being parvalbumins, enolases, and aldolases.",
author = "A Kuehn and F Codreanu-Morel and C Lehners-Weber and V Doyen and S-A Gomez-Andr{\'e} and F Bienvenu and J Fischer and N Ballardini and {van Hage}, M and J-M Perotin and S Silcret-Grieu and H Chabane and Fran{\cc}ois Hentges and M Ollert and Christiane Hilger and Martine Morisset",
note = "{\circledC} 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1111/all.12968",
language = "English",
volume = "71",
pages = "1772--1781",
journal = "Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology",
issn = "0105-4538",
publisher = "Wiley Online",
number = "12",

}

Kuehn, A, Codreanu-Morel, F, Lehners-Weber, C, Doyen, V, Gomez-André, S-A, Bienvenu, F, Fischer, J, Ballardini, N, van Hage, M, Perotin, J-M, Silcret-Grieu, S, Chabane, H, Hentges, F, Ollert, M, Hilger, C & Morisset, M 2016, 'Cross-reactivity to fish and chicken meat - a new clinical syndrome', Allergy, bind 71, nr. 12, s. 1772-1781. https://doi.org/10.1111/all.12968

Cross-reactivity to fish and chicken meat - a new clinical syndrome. / Kuehn, A; Codreanu-Morel, F; Lehners-Weber, C; Doyen, V; Gomez-André, S-A; Bienvenu, F; Fischer, J; Ballardini, N; van Hage, M; Perotin, J-M; Silcret-Grieu, S; Chabane, H; Hentges, François; Ollert, M; Hilger, Christiane; Morisset, Martine.

I: Allergy, Bind 71, Nr. 12, 2016, s. 1772-1781.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cross-reactivity to fish and chicken meat - a new clinical syndrome

AU - Kuehn, A

AU - Codreanu-Morel, F

AU - Lehners-Weber, C

AU - Doyen, V

AU - Gomez-André, S-A

AU - Bienvenu, F

AU - Fischer, J

AU - Ballardini, N

AU - van Hage, M

AU - Perotin, J-M

AU - Silcret-Grieu, S

AU - Chabane, H

AU - Hentges, François

AU - Ollert, M

AU - Hilger, Christiane

AU - Morisset, Martine

N1 - © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - BACKGROUND: Fish is one of the most allergenic foods. While clinical cross-reactivity among different fishes is a widely accepted feature of fish allergy, associations with other food allergies are not well understood. This study aims at analyzing the relevance of clinical cross-reactivity between fish and chicken meat in patients with allergy to chicken meat without sensitization to hen's eggs.METHODS: Patients with food allergy to fish and chicken meat (n = 29) or chicken meat only (n = 7) were recruited. IgE-reactive chicken proteins were identified (Edman, MS analysis) and quantified (ELISA). Allergens were used in IgE ELISA and skin testing.RESULTS: Chicken parvalbumin and two new allergens, aldolase and enolase, were identified at 12, 40, and 50 kDa, respectively. They were recognized by sIgE of 61%, 75%, and 83% of all patient sera which were in the majority of the cases positive for the fish homologues as well. Fish and chicken meat allergens were highly cross-reactive while high inhibition rates with fish or chicken allergens correlated with the patients' primary sensitization to fish or chicken. In cooked or roasted foods, enolase and aldolase were detectable in chicken breast while parvalbumin was detectable in chicken legs and wings.CONCLUSIONS: Fish and chicken meat are cross-reactive foods; both fish-allergic and chicken meat-allergic patients might be at risk of developing a food allergy to chicken meat or to fish, respectively. This clinical phenomenon is proposed to be termed 'fish-chicken syndrome' with cross-reactive allergens involved being parvalbumins, enolases, and aldolases.

AB - BACKGROUND: Fish is one of the most allergenic foods. While clinical cross-reactivity among different fishes is a widely accepted feature of fish allergy, associations with other food allergies are not well understood. This study aims at analyzing the relevance of clinical cross-reactivity between fish and chicken meat in patients with allergy to chicken meat without sensitization to hen's eggs.METHODS: Patients with food allergy to fish and chicken meat (n = 29) or chicken meat only (n = 7) were recruited. IgE-reactive chicken proteins were identified (Edman, MS analysis) and quantified (ELISA). Allergens were used in IgE ELISA and skin testing.RESULTS: Chicken parvalbumin and two new allergens, aldolase and enolase, were identified at 12, 40, and 50 kDa, respectively. They were recognized by sIgE of 61%, 75%, and 83% of all patient sera which were in the majority of the cases positive for the fish homologues as well. Fish and chicken meat allergens were highly cross-reactive while high inhibition rates with fish or chicken allergens correlated with the patients' primary sensitization to fish or chicken. In cooked or roasted foods, enolase and aldolase were detectable in chicken breast while parvalbumin was detectable in chicken legs and wings.CONCLUSIONS: Fish and chicken meat are cross-reactive foods; both fish-allergic and chicken meat-allergic patients might be at risk of developing a food allergy to chicken meat or to fish, respectively. This clinical phenomenon is proposed to be termed 'fish-chicken syndrome' with cross-reactive allergens involved being parvalbumins, enolases, and aldolases.

U2 - 10.1111/all.12968

DO - 10.1111/all.12968

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27344988

VL - 71

SP - 1772

EP - 1781

JO - Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

JF - Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

SN - 0105-4538

IS - 12

ER -

Kuehn A, Codreanu-Morel F, Lehners-Weber C, Doyen V, Gomez-André S-A, Bienvenu F et al. Cross-reactivity to fish and chicken meat - a new clinical syndrome. Allergy. 2016;71(12):1772-1781. https://doi.org/10.1111/all.12968