Coronary volume to left ventricular mass ratio in patients with diabetes mellitus

Jurrien H. Kuneman, Mohammed El Mahdiui, Alexander R. van Rosendael, Inge J. van den Hoogen, Manesh R. Patel, Bjarne Linde Nørgaard, Timothy A. Fairbairn, Koen Nieman, Takashi Akasaka, Daniel S. Berman, Lynne M. Hurwitz Koweek, Gianluca Pontone, Tomohiro Kawasaki, Niels Peter Rønnow Sand, Jesper M. Jensen, Tetsuya Amano, Michael Poon, Kristian A. Øvrehus, Jeroen Sonck, Mark G. RabbatBernard De Bruyne, Campbell Rogers, Hitoshi Matsuo, Jeroen J. Bax, Jonathon A. Leipsic, Juhani Knuuti*

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Abstrakt

Background: Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) and may provoke structural and functional changes in coronary vasculature. The coronary volume to left ventricular mass (V/M) ratio is a new anatomical parameter capable of revealing a potential physiological imbalance between coronary vasculature and myocardial mass. The aim of this study was to examine the V/M derived from coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in patients with diabetes. Methods: Patients with clinically suspected CAD enrolled in the ADVANCE (Assessing Diagnostic Value of Non-invasive FFRCT in Coronary Care) registry and known diabetic status were included. Coronary artery volume and left ventricular myocardial mass were analyzed from CCTA and the V/M ratio was calculated and compared between patients with and without diabetes. Results: Of the 3053 patients (age 66 ​± ​10 years; 66% male) with known diabetic status, diabetes was present in 21.9%. Coronary volume was lower in patients with diabetes compared to those without diabetes (2850 ​± ​940 ​mm3 vs. 3040 ​± ​970 ​mm3, p ​< ​0.0001), whereas the myocardial mass was comparable between the 2 groups (122 ​± ​33 ​g vs. 122 ​± ​32 ​g, p ​= ​0.70). The V/M ratio was significantly lower in patients with diabetes (23.9 ​± ​6.8 ​mm3/g vs. 25.7 ​± ​7.5 ​mm3/g, p ​< ​0.0001). Among subjects with obstructive CAD (n ​= ​2191, 24.0% diabetics) and non-obstructive CAD (16.7% diabetics), the V/M ratio was significantly lower in patients with diabetes compared to those without (23.4 ​± ​6.7 ​mm3/g vs. 25.0 ​± ​7.3 ​mm3/g, p ​< ​0.0001 and 25.6 ​± ​6.9 ​mm3/g vs. 27.3 ​± ​7.6 ​mm3/g, respectively, p ​= ​0.006). Conclusion: The V/M ratio was significantly lower in patients with diabetes compared to non-diabetics, even after correcting for obstructive coronary stenosis. The clinical value of the reduced V/M ratio in diabetic patients needs further investigation.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography
ISSN1934-5925
DOI
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 1. feb. 2022

Bibliografisk note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by HeartFlow Inc., Redwood City, CA, USA.The department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands has received unrestricted research grants from Medtronic, Biotronik, Boston Scientific, and Edwards Lifesciences. Dr. Patel has received research grants from HeartFlow, Bayer, Janssen, and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; and has served on the advisory board for HeartFlow, Bayer, and Janssen. Dr. N?rgaard has received unrestricted institutional research grants from Siemens and HeartFlow. Dr. Fairbairn has served on the Speakers Bureau for HeartFlow. Dr. Nieman has received institutional research support from Siemens Healthineers, HeartFlow, GE Healthcare, and Bayer Healthcare. Dr. Berman has received unrestricted research support from HeartFlow. Dr. Hurwitz Koweek has received research support and speaking fees from HeartFlow and Siemens. Dr. Pontone has received institutional research grant and/or honorarium as consultant/speaker from GE Healthcare, Boehringer, Bracco, Medtronic, Bayer, and HeartFlow. Dr. Sonck has received research grant support from the Cardiopath PhD program. Dr. Rabbat has served as a consultant for HeartFlow. Dr. De Bruyne has received consulting fees from Abbott, Opsens, and Boston Scientific; and is a shareholder for Siemens, GE Healthcare, Bayer, Philips, HeartFlow, Edwards Lifesciences, and Sanofi. Dr. Rogers is employee of and owns equity in HeartFlow. Dr. Leipsic has received research grants from GE Healthcare and Edwards Lifesciences; and has served as a consultant for and holds stock options in Circle Cardiovascular Imaging and HeartFlow Inc. Dr. Bax has received speaker fees from Abbot Vascular. Dr. Knuuti has received consultancy fees from GE Healthcare and AstraZeneca and speaker fees from GE Healthcare, Bayer, Lundbeck, Boehringer-Ingelheim and Merck, outside of the submitted work. All other authors have reported that they have no relationships relevant to the contents of this paper to disclose.

Funding Information:
The department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands has received unrestricted research grants from Medtronic, Biotronik, Boston Scientific, and Edwards Lifesciences . Dr. Patel has received research grants from HeartFlow, Bayer, Janssen, and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute ; and has served on the advisory board for HeartFlow, Bayer, and Janssen. Dr. Nørgaard has received unrestricted institutional research grants from Siemens and HeartFlow. Dr. Fairbairn has served on the Speakers Bureau for HeartFlow. Dr. Nieman has received institutional research support from Siemens Healthineers, HeartFlow, GE Healthcare, and Bayer Healthcare. Dr. Berman has received unrestricted research support from HeartFlow. Dr. Hurwitz Koweek has received research support and speaking fees from HeartFlow and Siemens. Dr. Pontone has received institutional research grant and/or honorarium as consultant/speaker from GE Healthcare, Boehringer, Bracco, Medtronic, Bayer, and HeartFlow. Dr. Sonck has received research grant support from the Cardiopath PhD program. Dr. Rabbat has served as a consultant for HeartFlow. Dr. De Bruyne has received consulting fees from Abbott, Opsens, and Boston Scientific; and is a shareholder for Siemens, GE Healthcare, Bayer, Philips, HeartFlow, Edwards Lifesciences, and Sanofi. Dr. Rogers is employee of and owns equity in HeartFlow. Dr. Leipsic has received research grants from GE Healthcare and Edwards Lifesciences; and has served as a consultant for and holds stock options in Circle Cardiovascular Imaging and HeartFlow Inc. Dr. Bax has received speaker fees from Abbot Vascular. Dr. Knuuti has received consultancy fees from GE Healthcare and AstraZeneca and speaker fees from GE Healthcare, Bayer, Lundbeck, Boehringer-Ingelheim and Merck, outside of the submitted work. All other authors have reported that they have no relationships relevant to the contents of this paper to disclose.

Funding Information:
This study was supported by HeartFlow Inc., Redwood City, CA, USA .

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