Coordinating joint action in a technological environment: noticing and recruiting attention

Maria Egbert, Elizabeth Keating

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt i tidsskriftForskningpeer review

Resumé

Implementing Social Action: Constructing Turns and Sequences in ''Interaction Technologies'' [contribution to the panel Constructing social action in conversation, organized by Drew Paul]
In investigating how turns and sequences might be designed to accomplish a particular social action, we look at contexts where such actions must be accomplished through technological mediation, such as in establishing a participation framework (in the case of video conferencing or online gaming) or enabling interaction (in the case of hearing aids). Such ‘interaction technologies’ differ from technical objects being talked about or technologies used towards specific interactional goals in that they enable or make possible interaction. In designing turns and sequences in interaction enabled through interaction technologies, social actors must take into account a number of factors, including the effect of technology on multimodal communication resources and adaptation of conventions.
In this presentation we focus on how participants in interaction design their actions for and orient to interaction technologies. In particular we pursue the questions of how turns in interactions are designed and responded to, and how sequencing actions in technologically mediated environments are constructed with an orientation to the technology. In particular we look at the challenges for humans to adapt to communication technologies. Mainstream theoretical thinking in technology design seems to be based on an assumption that the nature of interaction is to transmit information (cf. Shannon & Weaver 1949). Influenced by conversation analysis (CA) and ethnography, designers of new technologies are now becoming more aware that human use of technologies is always a part of social practices (Suchman 1987; Buur & Stienstra 2007). The foundations of CA included the use of communication technology (the telephone), and conversation analytic research has shown that social actions are shaped by artefacts and technological environments (e.g. Goodwin and Goodwin 1996, Mondada in press), yet research on enabling interaction through technology has just begun.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftInternational Pragmatics Association - Abstracts
Sider (fra-til)203
StatusUdgivet - 2011

Fingeraftryk

interaction
conversation analysis
press research
communication technology
conversation
effects of technology
weaver
social actor
ethnography
mediation
telephone
new technology
artifact
video
participation
communication
resources

Citer dette

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Coordinating joint action in a technological environment: noticing and recruiting attention. / Egbert, Maria; Keating, Elizabeth.

I: International Pragmatics Association - Abstracts, 2011, s. 203.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt i tidsskriftForskningpeer review

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