Constructing meaning: Material products of a creative activity engage the social brain

Kristian Tylén, Johanne Stege Bjørndahl, Andreas Roepstorff, Riccardo Fusaroli

Publikation: AndetAndet bidragForskning

Resumé

Symbolic artifacts present a challenge to theories ofneurocognitive processing due to their dual nature: they areboth physical objects and vehicles of social meanings. Whiletheir physical properties can be read of the surface structure,the meaning of symbolic artifacts depends on theirembeddedness in cultural practices. In this study, participantsbuilt models of LEGO bricks to illustrate their understandingof abstract concepts. Subsequently, they were scanned withfMRI while presented to photographs of their own and others’models. When participants attended to the meaning of themodels, we observed activations associated with socialcognition and semantics. In contrast, when attending to thephysical properties, we observed activations related to objectrecognition and manipulation. Furthermore, when contrastingown and others’ models, we found activations in areasassociated with autobiographical memory and agency. Ourfindings support a view of symbolic artifacts as neurocognitive trails of human social interactions.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato2015
UdgiverCognitive Science Society
Antal sider6
ISBN (Trykt)9780991196722
StatusUdgivet - 2015

Fingeraftryk

Artifacts
Episodic Memory
Semantics

Citer dette

Tylén, K., Stege Bjørndahl, J., Roepstorff, A., & Fusaroli, R. (2015). Constructing meaning: Material products of a creative activity engage the social brain. Cognitive Science Society.
Tylén, Kristian ; Stege Bjørndahl, Johanne ; Roepstorff, Andreas ; Fusaroli, Riccardo. / Constructing meaning: Material products of a creative activity engage the social brain. 2015. Cognitive Science Society. 6 s.
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Tylén, K, Stege Bjørndahl, J, Roepstorff, A & Fusaroli, R 2015, Constructing meaning: Material products of a creative activity engage the social brain. Cognitive Science Society.

Constructing meaning: Material products of a creative activity engage the social brain. / Tylén, Kristian; Stege Bjørndahl, Johanne; Roepstorff, Andreas; Fusaroli, Riccardo.

6 s. Cognitive Science Society. 2015, peer-reviewed.

Publikation: AndetAndet bidragForskning

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