Conization and healthcare use

a population-based register study

Maria E Frederiksen, Miguel Vázquez-Prada Baillet, Pernille T Jensen, Carsten Rygaard, Jesper Hallas, Elsebeth Lynge

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Resumé

The aim of this study was to assess whether negative psychological consequences of conization reported in questionnaire studies translated into increased use of the healthcare services that could relieve such symptoms. This was a population-based register study comparing women undergoing conization with a control group of women with normal cytology results. Data were derived from Danish registers. Using the difference-in-differences method, we measured contacts with general practitioners (GPs), hospitals, psychiatrist/psychologists, and use of anxiolytic and antidepressant prescription drugs over 5 years 'before' and 'after' the conization in the study group, and in comparable periods in the control group. During the 'before' period, women who later had a conization had greater contact with GPs and hospitals, and slightly more contact with psychiatrist/psychologists, than control women. In both groups, healthcare use increased significantly from the 'before' to the 'after' period. For contacts with GPs and hospitals, the increase was significantly larger for the conization group than for the control group, but this could be attributed to the standard postconization follow-up process. In the 'before' period, women who later had a conization used fewer drugs than women of the control-group, but their drug use increased similarly over time. The conization event did not result in an increased use of the healthcare services that could relieve potential negative side effects. However, women who underwent a conization seemed to constitute a select group as they already used GPs and hospitals more frequently, and anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs less frequently, than other women in the years 'before' the conization event.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Journal of Cancer Prevention
Vol/bind28
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)124–130
ISSN0959-8278
DOI
StatusUdgivet - mar. 2019

Fingeraftryk

Conization
Registries
Delivery of Health Care
General Hospitals
General Practitioners
Control Groups
Drug and Narcotic Control
Cell Biology

Citer dette

Frederiksen, Maria E ; Vázquez-Prada Baillet, Miguel ; Jensen, Pernille T ; Rygaard, Carsten ; Hallas, Jesper ; Lynge, Elsebeth. / Conization and healthcare use : a population-based register study. I: European Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2019 ; Bind 28, Nr. 2. s. 124–130.
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Conization and healthcare use : a population-based register study. / Frederiksen, Maria E; Vázquez-Prada Baillet, Miguel; Jensen, Pernille T; Rygaard, Carsten; Hallas, Jesper; Lynge, Elsebeth.

I: European Journal of Cancer Prevention, Bind 28, Nr. 2, 03.2019, s. 124–130.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Conization and healthcare use

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AU - Frederiksen, Maria E

AU - Vázquez-Prada Baillet, Miguel

AU - Jensen, Pernille T

AU - Rygaard, Carsten

AU - Hallas, Jesper

AU - Lynge, Elsebeth

PY - 2019/3

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N2 - The aim of this study was to assess whether negative psychological consequences of conization reported in questionnaire studies translated into increased use of the healthcare services that could relieve such symptoms. This was a population-based register study comparing women undergoing conization with a control group of women with normal cytology results. Data were derived from Danish registers. Using the difference-in-differences method, we measured contacts with general practitioners (GPs), hospitals, psychiatrist/psychologists, and use of anxiolytic and antidepressant prescription drugs over 5 years 'before' and 'after' the conization in the study group, and in comparable periods in the control group. During the 'before' period, women who later had a conization had greater contact with GPs and hospitals, and slightly more contact with psychiatrist/psychologists, than control women. In both groups, healthcare use increased significantly from the 'before' to the 'after' period. For contacts with GPs and hospitals, the increase was significantly larger for the conization group than for the control group, but this could be attributed to the standard postconization follow-up process. In the 'before' period, women who later had a conization used fewer drugs than women of the control-group, but their drug use increased similarly over time. The conization event did not result in an increased use of the healthcare services that could relieve potential negative side effects. However, women who underwent a conization seemed to constitute a select group as they already used GPs and hospitals more frequently, and anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs less frequently, than other women in the years 'before' the conization event.

AB - The aim of this study was to assess whether negative psychological consequences of conization reported in questionnaire studies translated into increased use of the healthcare services that could relieve such symptoms. This was a population-based register study comparing women undergoing conization with a control group of women with normal cytology results. Data were derived from Danish registers. Using the difference-in-differences method, we measured contacts with general practitioners (GPs), hospitals, psychiatrist/psychologists, and use of anxiolytic and antidepressant prescription drugs over 5 years 'before' and 'after' the conization in the study group, and in comparable periods in the control group. During the 'before' period, women who later had a conization had greater contact with GPs and hospitals, and slightly more contact with psychiatrist/psychologists, than control women. In both groups, healthcare use increased significantly from the 'before' to the 'after' period. For contacts with GPs and hospitals, the increase was significantly larger for the conization group than for the control group, but this could be attributed to the standard postconization follow-up process. In the 'before' period, women who later had a conization used fewer drugs than women of the control-group, but their drug use increased similarly over time. The conization event did not result in an increased use of the healthcare services that could relieve potential negative side effects. However, women who underwent a conization seemed to constitute a select group as they already used GPs and hospitals more frequently, and anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs less frequently, than other women in the years 'before' the conization event.

KW - cervical neoplasia

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KW - general practitioners

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