Cognitive agents - a procedural perspective relying on the predictability of Object-Action-Complexes (OACs).

Florentin Wörgötter, A. Agostino, Norbert Krüger, N. Shylo, Bernd Porr

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Embodied cognition suggests that complex cognitive traits can only arise when agents have a body
situated in the world. The aspects of embodiment and situatedness are being discussed here from the
perspective of linear systems theory. This perspective treats bodies as dynamic, temporally variable
entities, which can be extended (or curtailed) at their boundaries. We show how acting agents can, for
example, actively extend their body for some time by incorporating predictably behaving parts of the
world and how this affects the transfer functions. We suggest that primates have mastered this to a
large degree increasingly splitting their world into predictable and unpredictable entities. We argue that
temporary body extension may have been instrumental in paving the way for the development of higher
cognitive complexity as it is reliably widening the cause-effect horizon about the actions of the agent. A
first robot experiment is sketched to support these ideas.

We continue discussing the concept of Object-Action Complexes (OACs) introduced by the European
PACO-PLUS consortium to emphasize the notion that, for a cognitive agent, objects and actions are
inseparably intertwined. In another robot experiment we devise a semi-supervised procedure using the
OAC-concept to demonstrate how an agent can acquire knowledge about its world. Here the notion of
predicting changes fundamentally underlies the implemented procedure and we try to show how this
concept can be used to improve the robot's inner model and behaviour. Hence, in this article we have
tried to show how predictability can be used to augment the agent's body and to acquire knowledge about
the external world, possibly leading to more advanced cognitive traits.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftRobotics and Autonomous Systems
Vol/bind57
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)420-432
Antal sider12
ISSN0921-8890
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2009

Citer dette

Wörgötter, Florentin ; Agostino, A. ; Krüger, Norbert ; Shylo, N. ; Porr, Bernd. / Cognitive agents - a procedural perspective relying on the predictability of Object-Action-Complexes (OACs). I: Robotics and Autonomous Systems. 2009 ; Bind 57, Nr. 4. s. 420-432.
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Cognitive agents - a procedural perspective relying on the predictability of Object-Action-Complexes (OACs). / Wörgötter, Florentin; Agostino, A.; Krüger, Norbert; Shylo, N.; Porr, Bernd.

I: Robotics and Autonomous Systems, Bind 57, Nr. 4, 2009, s. 420-432.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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AU - Krüger, Norbert

AU - Shylo, N.

AU - Porr, Bernd

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