Cognitive Ability, Principled Reasoning and Political Tolerance

Stig Hebbelstrup Rye Rasmussen, Asbjørn Sonne Nørgaard

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPaperForskningpeer review

Resumé

Individuals are not equally politically tolerant. To explain why, individual differences in emotions and threat have received much scholarly attention in recent years. However, extant research also shows that psychological dispositions, habitual cognitive styles, ideological orientation and ‘principled reasoning’ influence political tolerance judgments. The extent to which cognitive ability plays a role has not been entertained even if the capacity to think abstractly, comprehend complex ideas and apply abstract ideas to concrete situations is inherent to both principled tolerance judgment and cognitive ability. Cognitive ability, we argue and show, adds to the etiology of political tolerance.
In Danish and American samples cognitive ability strongly predicts political tolerance after taking habitual cognitive styles (as measured by personality traits), education, social ideology, and feelings of threat into account. Also, a survey experiment shows that the most cognitively able are more willing to extend civil liberties to extreme groups (Neo Nazis) as compared to non-extreme groups (Far Right/Christian Fundamentalists) than the less cognitively able. In the conclusion we discuss the theoretical and normative implications of our findings.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdatoapr. 2015
Antal sider45
StatusUdgivet - apr. 2015
Begivenhed73rd Annual Midwest Political Science Association Conference - Chicago, USA
Varighed: 16. apr. 201519. apr. 2015

Konference

Konference73rd Annual Midwest Political Science Association Conference
LandUSA
ByChicago
Periode16/04/201519/04/2015

Citer dette

Hebbelstrup Rye Rasmussen, S., & Nørgaard, A. S. (2015). Cognitive Ability, Principled Reasoning and Political Tolerance. Afhandling præsenteret på 73rd Annual Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, USA.
Hebbelstrup Rye Rasmussen, Stig ; Nørgaard, Asbjørn Sonne. / Cognitive Ability, Principled Reasoning and Political Tolerance. Afhandling præsenteret på 73rd Annual Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, USA.45 s.
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Hebbelstrup Rye Rasmussen, S & Nørgaard, AS 2015, 'Cognitive Ability, Principled Reasoning and Political Tolerance' Paper fremlagt ved 73rd Annual Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, USA, 16/04/2015 - 19/04/2015, .

Cognitive Ability, Principled Reasoning and Political Tolerance. / Hebbelstrup Rye Rasmussen, Stig; Nørgaard, Asbjørn Sonne.

2015. Afhandling præsenteret på 73rd Annual Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, USA.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPaperForskningpeer review

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Hebbelstrup Rye Rasmussen S, Nørgaard AS. Cognitive Ability, Principled Reasoning and Political Tolerance. 2015. Afhandling præsenteret på 73rd Annual Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, USA.