Club Diplomacy in the Arctic

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

The Arctic Council is frequently called a unique forum but, as this article argues, clubs are common in international politics and in many respects the Arctic Council is a club. This article explores the questions: Why are the Arctic states acting like a club in Arctic politics, and how do internal hierarchies influence how clubs make decisions? As the article illustrates, clubs are the stage for club diplomacy and, in club diplomacy, hierarchies play an important role. Using the Arctic Council as an illustrative case study, this article argues that clubs have internal hierarchies that inform their decision-making processes and their responses to challenges to their status. When clubs try to deal with subjects that extend beyond the boundaries of the sovereignty of club members and the parameters of club membership, club members may suffer from a lack of status and legitimacy to unilaterally deal with the subject.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftGlobal Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations
Vol/bind25
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)304-326
ISSN1075-2846
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jun. 2019

Fingeraftryk

sovereignty
clubs
Arctic
club
diplomacy
politics
Decision making
decision making
club member
International Politics
decision-making process
legitimacy
parameter
international politics
decision
lack

Bibliografisk note

This project was supported by the Carlsberg Foundation as part the Distinguished Postdoctoral Research Fellowship (Project Number: CF15-0434). Thank you to the interviewees who participated in the research for this paper. Thank you to the School of Political Science at the University of Ottawa and the Department of Political and Economic Studies at the University of Helsinki for hosting me as a visiting scholar during the research of this piece and to Christian Rouillard (Ottawa) and Juri Mykkänen (Helsinki), in particular, for helping to arrange these visiting positions. Lastly thank you to my colleagues at the University of Southern Denmark and the Center for War Studies for their assistance and feedback during the writing of this piece, with a special thank you to Pål Røren and Arjen van Dalen for their help.

Citer dette

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Club Diplomacy in the Arctic. / Burke, Danita Catherine.

I: Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations, Bind 25, Nr. 2, 06.2019, s. 304-326.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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