Carbon Nanotubes and Other Nanostructures as Support Material for Nanoparticulate Noble-Metal Catalysts in Fuel Cells

Mikkel Juul Larsen, Sune Veltzé, Eivind Morten Skou

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskning

Resumé

In polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) a fuel - usually hydrogen - and oxygen are combined to produce electricity and water in an electrochemical process, which is commonly carried out at 60-80 °C. For oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation to occur at such low temperatures platinum or platinum-alloy catalysts in the electrodes are required. To maximize the utilization of the noble metal it is frequently deposited as nanoparticles (1-5 nm) on a stabilizing support of carbon black. Carbon black provides good anchoring of the catalyst particles, but is prone to severe destructive oxidation at high electrical potentials encountered occasionally in fuel cells. Other nanostructures of carbon are being investigated as alternatives to carbon black as they have several beneficial properties. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MW-CNT) are an example of one type of these promising materials. Like carbon black they can conduct electrons to and from the reaction sites, and in addition their resistance to electrochemical degradation is better than that of carbon black due to their much higher structural perfection. This latter feature is indeed highly desired with a view to the durability of the fuel-cell electrodes. However, the low concentration of structural defects also poses challenges with regard to anchoring of the catalyst particles on the CNT surface. Thus, activation treatments introducing surface functional groups may be necessary. Also, the surface properties are responsible for difficulties in contacting the nanotubes with other substances in the electrode or electrode preparation. Other promising candidate structures for catalyst support include carbon nanofibers (CNF) and various modifications of CNTs. We present some of our work with the investigation of surface properties that are relevant for the preparation of fuel-cell electrodes with increased durability. This includes adsorption studies and studies of the role of the surface structure in the generation of materials-deteriorating reaction intermediates during the electrocatalytic processes.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato2010
Antal sider1
StatusUdgivet - 2010
BegivenhedRecent Advances in Graphene and Related Materials - Singapore, Singapore
Varighed: 1. aug. 20105. aug. 2010

Konference

KonferenceRecent Advances in Graphene and Related Materials
LandSingapore
BySingapore
Periode01/08/201005/08/2010

Fingeraftryk

Soot
Carbon Nanotubes
Precious metals
Catalyst supports
Fuel cells
Nanostructures
Electrodes
Catalysts
Surface properties
Durability
Platinum alloys
Oxygen
Reaction intermediates
Oxidation
Hydrogen fuels
Carbon nanofibers
Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC)
Platinum
Surface structure
Nanotubes

Emneord

  • Brændselsceller, carbon, kulstof, nanorør, nanofibre, katalysatorbæremateriale, ESR, RDE, RRDE

Citer dette

Larsen, M. J., Veltzé, S., & Skou, E. M. (2010). Carbon Nanotubes and Other Nanostructures as Support Material for Nanoparticulate Noble-Metal Catalysts in Fuel Cells. Poster session præsenteret på Recent Advances in Graphene and Related Materials, Singapore, Singapore.
Larsen, Mikkel Juul ; Veltzé, Sune ; Skou, Eivind Morten. / Carbon Nanotubes and Other Nanostructures as Support Material for Nanoparticulate Noble-Metal Catalysts in Fuel Cells. Poster session præsenteret på Recent Advances in Graphene and Related Materials, Singapore, Singapore.1 s.
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abstract = "In polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) a fuel - usually hydrogen - and oxygen are combined to produce electricity and water in an electrochemical process, which is commonly carried out at 60-80 °C. For oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation to occur at such low temperatures platinum or platinum-alloy catalysts in the electrodes are required. To maximize the utilization of the noble metal it is frequently deposited as nanoparticles (1-5 nm) on a stabilizing support of carbon black. Carbon black provides good anchoring of the catalyst particles, but is prone to severe destructive oxidation at high electrical potentials encountered occasionally in fuel cells. Other nanostructures of carbon are being investigated as alternatives to carbon black as they have several beneficial properties. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MW-CNT) are an example of one type of these promising materials. Like carbon black they can conduct electrons to and from the reaction sites, and in addition their resistance to electrochemical degradation is better than that of carbon black due to their much higher structural perfection. This latter feature is indeed highly desired with a view to the durability of the fuel-cell electrodes. However, the low concentration of structural defects also poses challenges with regard to anchoring of the catalyst particles on the CNT surface. Thus, activation treatments introducing surface functional groups may be necessary. Also, the surface properties are responsible for difficulties in contacting the nanotubes with other substances in the electrode or electrode preparation. Other promising candidate structures for catalyst support include carbon nanofibers (CNF) and various modifications of CNTs. We present some of our work with the investigation of surface properties that are relevant for the preparation of fuel-cell electrodes with increased durability. This includes adsorption studies and studies of the role of the surface structure in the generation of materials-deteriorating reaction intermediates during the electrocatalytic processes.",
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Larsen, MJ, Veltzé, S & Skou, EM 2010, 'Carbon Nanotubes and Other Nanostructures as Support Material for Nanoparticulate Noble-Metal Catalysts in Fuel Cells' Recent Advances in Graphene and Related Materials, Singapore, Singapore, 01/08/2010 - 05/08/2010, .

Carbon Nanotubes and Other Nanostructures as Support Material for Nanoparticulate Noble-Metal Catalysts in Fuel Cells. / Larsen, Mikkel Juul; Veltzé, Sune; Skou, Eivind Morten.

2010. Poster session præsenteret på Recent Advances in Graphene and Related Materials, Singapore, Singapore.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskning

TY - CONF

T1 - Carbon Nanotubes and Other Nanostructures as Support Material for Nanoparticulate Noble-Metal Catalysts in Fuel Cells

AU - Larsen, Mikkel Juul

AU - Veltzé, Sune

AU - Skou, Eivind Morten

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - In polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) a fuel - usually hydrogen - and oxygen are combined to produce electricity and water in an electrochemical process, which is commonly carried out at 60-80 °C. For oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation to occur at such low temperatures platinum or platinum-alloy catalysts in the electrodes are required. To maximize the utilization of the noble metal it is frequently deposited as nanoparticles (1-5 nm) on a stabilizing support of carbon black. Carbon black provides good anchoring of the catalyst particles, but is prone to severe destructive oxidation at high electrical potentials encountered occasionally in fuel cells. Other nanostructures of carbon are being investigated as alternatives to carbon black as they have several beneficial properties. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MW-CNT) are an example of one type of these promising materials. Like carbon black they can conduct electrons to and from the reaction sites, and in addition their resistance to electrochemical degradation is better than that of carbon black due to their much higher structural perfection. This latter feature is indeed highly desired with a view to the durability of the fuel-cell electrodes. However, the low concentration of structural defects also poses challenges with regard to anchoring of the catalyst particles on the CNT surface. Thus, activation treatments introducing surface functional groups may be necessary. Also, the surface properties are responsible for difficulties in contacting the nanotubes with other substances in the electrode or electrode preparation. Other promising candidate structures for catalyst support include carbon nanofibers (CNF) and various modifications of CNTs. We present some of our work with the investigation of surface properties that are relevant for the preparation of fuel-cell electrodes with increased durability. This includes adsorption studies and studies of the role of the surface structure in the generation of materials-deteriorating reaction intermediates during the electrocatalytic processes.

AB - In polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) a fuel - usually hydrogen - and oxygen are combined to produce electricity and water in an electrochemical process, which is commonly carried out at 60-80 °C. For oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation to occur at such low temperatures platinum or platinum-alloy catalysts in the electrodes are required. To maximize the utilization of the noble metal it is frequently deposited as nanoparticles (1-5 nm) on a stabilizing support of carbon black. Carbon black provides good anchoring of the catalyst particles, but is prone to severe destructive oxidation at high electrical potentials encountered occasionally in fuel cells. Other nanostructures of carbon are being investigated as alternatives to carbon black as they have several beneficial properties. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MW-CNT) are an example of one type of these promising materials. Like carbon black they can conduct electrons to and from the reaction sites, and in addition their resistance to electrochemical degradation is better than that of carbon black due to their much higher structural perfection. This latter feature is indeed highly desired with a view to the durability of the fuel-cell electrodes. However, the low concentration of structural defects also poses challenges with regard to anchoring of the catalyst particles on the CNT surface. Thus, activation treatments introducing surface functional groups may be necessary. Also, the surface properties are responsible for difficulties in contacting the nanotubes with other substances in the electrode or electrode preparation. Other promising candidate structures for catalyst support include carbon nanofibers (CNF) and various modifications of CNTs. We present some of our work with the investigation of surface properties that are relevant for the preparation of fuel-cell electrodes with increased durability. This includes adsorption studies and studies of the role of the surface structure in the generation of materials-deteriorating reaction intermediates during the electrocatalytic processes.

KW - Brændselsceller, carbon, kulstof, nanorør, nanofibre, katalysatorbæremateriale, ESR, RDE, RRDE

KW - Fuel cells, carbon, nanotubes, nanofibres, catalyst support, ESR, RDE, RRDE

M3 - Poster

ER -

Larsen MJ, Veltzé S, Skou EM. Carbon Nanotubes and Other Nanostructures as Support Material for Nanoparticulate Noble-Metal Catalysts in Fuel Cells. 2010. Poster session præsenteret på Recent Advances in Graphene and Related Materials, Singapore, Singapore.