Carbon mineralization in Arctic sediments northeast of Svalbard: Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction as principal anaerobic respiratory pathways

Verona Vandieken, Maren Nickel, Bo Barker Jørgensen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: Sept. 2006
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftMarine Ecology - Progress Series
Vol/bind322
Sider (fra-til)15-27
Antal sider13
ISSN0171-8630
StatusUdgivet - 1. sep. 2006
Udgivet eksterntJa

Fingeraftryk

Arctic region
mineralization
sulfates
sediments
carbon
sediment
sulfate
primary productivity
ice
oxidation
incubation
Barents Sea
secondary productivity
anoxic sediment
bags
fjord
ice cover
detection limit
zonation
electrons

Citer dette

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title = "Carbon mineralization in Arctic sediments northeast of Svalbard: Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction as principal anaerobic respiratory pathways",
abstract = "Carbon oxidation rates and pathways were determined in 3 sediments at latitude 79° to81° N in the Barents Sea, where the ice cover restricts primary production to a few months of the year.Oxygen uptake (1.5 to 3.5 mmol m–2 d–1) and sulfate reduction (<0.1 to 0.22 mmol m–2 d–1 over 0 to10 cm depth) rates were measured by whole core incubation. Pathways of anaerobic carbon oxidationwere determined by combining results of anoxic sediment bag incubations with pore water andsolid phase analyses of the sediments. In accordance with the high contents of solid Mn (≥60 μmolcm–3) and Fe(III) (≥108 μmol cm–3), dissimilatory Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction contributed between 69and ≥90{\%} to anaerobic carbon mineralization in the upper 10 cm of the sediments. At 2 of the 3 stations,sulfate reduction rates were below our detection limit of 1 nmol cm–3 d–1. Solid Mn and Fe(III)were abundant from the surface to 10 cm sediment depth and were apparently the only importantanaerobic electron acceptors. At the third station, vertical zonation of anaerobic mineralization wasobserved, with Mn(IV) reduction at 0 to 3 cm followed by concurrent Fe(III) and sulfate reduction at3 to 5 cm and sulfate reduction at 5 to 10 cm. Rates of microbial carbon oxidation were low comparedto those in fjords on the west and south coasts of Svalbard. This is in accordance with the limitedorganic carbon supply by primary and secondary productivity caused by long periods of ice coverage.",
author = "Verona Vandieken and Maren Nickel and J{\o}rgensen, {Bo Barker}",
year = "2006",
month = "9",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "322",
pages = "15--27",
journal = "Marine Ecology - Progress Series",
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Carbon mineralization in Arctic sediments northeast of Svalbard: Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction as principal anaerobic respiratory pathways. / Vandieken, Verona; Nickel, Maren; Jørgensen, Bo Barker.

I: Marine Ecology - Progress Series, Bind 322, 01.09.2006, s. 15-27.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Carbon mineralization in Arctic sediments northeast of Svalbard: Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction as principal anaerobic respiratory pathways

AU - Vandieken, Verona

AU - Nickel, Maren

AU - Jørgensen, Bo Barker

PY - 2006/9/1

Y1 - 2006/9/1

N2 - Carbon oxidation rates and pathways were determined in 3 sediments at latitude 79° to81° N in the Barents Sea, where the ice cover restricts primary production to a few months of the year.Oxygen uptake (1.5 to 3.5 mmol m–2 d–1) and sulfate reduction (<0.1 to 0.22 mmol m–2 d–1 over 0 to10 cm depth) rates were measured by whole core incubation. Pathways of anaerobic carbon oxidationwere determined by combining results of anoxic sediment bag incubations with pore water andsolid phase analyses of the sediments. In accordance with the high contents of solid Mn (≥60 μmolcm–3) and Fe(III) (≥108 μmol cm–3), dissimilatory Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction contributed between 69and ≥90% to anaerobic carbon mineralization in the upper 10 cm of the sediments. At 2 of the 3 stations,sulfate reduction rates were below our detection limit of 1 nmol cm–3 d–1. Solid Mn and Fe(III)were abundant from the surface to 10 cm sediment depth and were apparently the only importantanaerobic electron acceptors. At the third station, vertical zonation of anaerobic mineralization wasobserved, with Mn(IV) reduction at 0 to 3 cm followed by concurrent Fe(III) and sulfate reduction at3 to 5 cm and sulfate reduction at 5 to 10 cm. Rates of microbial carbon oxidation were low comparedto those in fjords on the west and south coasts of Svalbard. This is in accordance with the limitedorganic carbon supply by primary and secondary productivity caused by long periods of ice coverage.

AB - Carbon oxidation rates and pathways were determined in 3 sediments at latitude 79° to81° N in the Barents Sea, where the ice cover restricts primary production to a few months of the year.Oxygen uptake (1.5 to 3.5 mmol m–2 d–1) and sulfate reduction (<0.1 to 0.22 mmol m–2 d–1 over 0 to10 cm depth) rates were measured by whole core incubation. Pathways of anaerobic carbon oxidationwere determined by combining results of anoxic sediment bag incubations with pore water andsolid phase analyses of the sediments. In accordance with the high contents of solid Mn (≥60 μmolcm–3) and Fe(III) (≥108 μmol cm–3), dissimilatory Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction contributed between 69and ≥90% to anaerobic carbon mineralization in the upper 10 cm of the sediments. At 2 of the 3 stations,sulfate reduction rates were below our detection limit of 1 nmol cm–3 d–1. Solid Mn and Fe(III)were abundant from the surface to 10 cm sediment depth and were apparently the only importantanaerobic electron acceptors. At the third station, vertical zonation of anaerobic mineralization wasobserved, with Mn(IV) reduction at 0 to 3 cm followed by concurrent Fe(III) and sulfate reduction at3 to 5 cm and sulfate reduction at 5 to 10 cm. Rates of microbial carbon oxidation were low comparedto those in fjords on the west and south coasts of Svalbard. This is in accordance with the limitedorganic carbon supply by primary and secondary productivity caused by long periods of ice coverage.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 322

SP - 15

EP - 27

JO - Marine Ecology - Progress Series

JF - Marine Ecology - Progress Series

SN - 0171-8630

ER -