Capitalism in Times of Crisis

Danish Industrialists and the State, c. 1910-1940

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

This article investigates how Danish industrialists responded to the rise of the modern state in the decades up until the Second World War, a period in which many of the basic principles of liberal capitalism were called into question, and in which the relationship between the state and the economy underwent major changes in all Western societies. It argues that the industrialists remained firm believers in classical liberalism and, on that ground, opposed growing state intervention as a slide towards socialism. The article has an emphasis on their reactions to calls for social policy initiatives, and it shows that the industrialists typically opposed such initiatives, either on pure ideological grounds or as conflicting with the economic competitiveness of Danish firms. When accommodation to selected demands for a stronger state did take place, it was typically in periods of crisis, the most important being the years just after the First World War. The interwar years did, however, see some approbation to increasing state intervention in the economy, and in the 1930s the idea of cooperation with the state entered their rhetoric. Thus, the article argues that the rhetoric and narratives gradually changed, while the ideological core did not.

Capitalism, Industry, The State, Denmark, Interwar Period
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftScandinavian Journal of History
Vol/bind44
Sider (fra-til)552-571
ISSN0346-8755
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2019

Fingeraftryk

Capitalism
Industrialists
Economy
State Intervention
Rhetoric
Modern State
World War I
Second World War
Competitiveness
Denmark
Interwar Years
Social Policy
Economics
Rise
Believer
1930s
Industry
Accommodation
Liberalism
Western Societies

Citer dette

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Capitalism in Times of Crisis : Danish Industrialists and the State, c. 1910-1940. / Nevers, Jeppe.

I: Scandinavian Journal of History, Bind 44, 2019, s. 552-571.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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AB - This article investigates how Danish industrialists responded to the rise of the modern state in the decades up until the Second World War, a period in which many of the basic principles of liberal capitalism were called into question, and in which the relationship between the state and the economy underwent major changes in all Western societies. It argues that the industrialists remained firm believers in classical liberalism and, on that ground, opposed growing state intervention as a slide towards socialism. The article has an emphasis on their reactions to calls for social policy initiatives, and it shows that the industrialists typically opposed such initiatives, either on pure ideological grounds or as conflicting with the economic competitiveness of Danish firms. When accommodation to selected demands for a stronger state did take place, it was typically in periods of crisis, the most important being the years just after the First World War. The interwar years did, however, see some approbation to increasing state intervention in the economy, and in the 1930s the idea of cooperation with the state entered their rhetoric. Thus, the article argues that the rhetoric and narratives gradually changed, while the ideological core did not.Capitalism, Industry, The State, Denmark, Interwar Period

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