Can implementing a quiet room reduce the use of mechanical restraints?

Lene Lauge Berring, SM Bonde, L Johansen

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskningpeer review

Resumé

Background In order to reduce the use of mechanical restraints, this project aimed to implement a Quiet Room in a Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Previous studies has demonstrated that quiet rooms, such ascomfort rooms (Cf. Cummings, Grandfield and Coldwell, 2010) and sensory rooms(Cf. Bjôrkdahl 2015), contributed to higher patient satisfaction and lower rates of violence, seclusion and restraints. This poster describes the preliminary results and the implementations process.AimThe study aim was to 1) reduce the use of coercive measures such as mechanical restraints, 2) redirect agitated, threatening and violent patients toward a calmer personal space, and 3) offer the patients a quiet,clean and relaxing room in the unit where they were able to relax in a ‘staff and co-patient free zone’.MethodA quiet room was implemented at a Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit. The room was designed with relaxing furniture’s such as a comfortable chair, a ‘special calming down chair’, quiet music and nice pictures on the wall. All staff in the unit was taught how and when to utilize the quiet room and all patients enteringthe unit were introduced to the room. The room should be utilized when patients show signs of distress, anger or agitated behavior. In such situations the nurse enters into a dialogue with the patient and offers the quiet room. Furthermore, patients themselves may request to use the quiet room. Study data was collected since September 2014 until September 2015. Data consists of questionnaires with structured and semi-structured questions answered by patients and staff after each use of the room. Further, the use of coercive measures was registered throughout the data collection.Preliminary ResultsUntil now the room was used 150 times for at mean period of 1 hour. 66 different patients used the room between 1 and 5 times. Staff and patients report that coercive measures were avoided, however, we were not able to identify any changes within the registered use of mechanical restraints. Generally, patients experienced great benefits and reported that they appreciated the opportunity to withdraw to a room, which were not their ordinary patient room.Preliminary Conclusion Staff and patients were appreciating the implementation of a quiet room. The concept has been adjusted toward the users’ expectations and we have initiated a longer trial in order to follow the effect on mechanical restraints over a longer period of time. Educational Goals• To understand the implementations process by being aware of the opportunities and challenges within the system• To take note on the difficulties in monitoring effect of altered caring-approaches such as a quiet room
OriginalsprogDansk
Publikationsdato9. nov. 2015
Antal sider1
StatusUdgivet - 9. nov. 2015
Udgivet eksterntJa
BegivenhedViolence in Clinical Psychiatry - Copenhagen, Danmark
Varighed: 22. okt. 201524. okt. 2015
Konferencens nummer: 9th

Konference

KonferenceViolence in Clinical Psychiatry
Nummer9th
LandDanmark
ByCopenhagen
Periode22/10/201524/10/2015

Citer dette

Lauge Berring, L., Bonde, SM., & Johansen, L. (2015). Can implementing a quiet room reduce the use of mechanical restraints?. Poster session præsenteret på Violence in Clinical Psychiatry, Copenhagen, Danmark.
Lauge Berring, Lene ; Bonde, SM ; Johansen, L. / Can implementing a quiet room reduce the use of mechanical restraints?. Poster session præsenteret på Violence in Clinical Psychiatry, Copenhagen, Danmark.1 s.
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title = "Can implementing a quiet room reduce the use of mechanical restraints?",
abstract = "Background In order to reduce the use of mechanical restraints, this project aimed to implement a Quiet Room in a Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Previous studies has demonstrated that quiet rooms, such ascomfort rooms (Cf. Cummings, Grandfield and Coldwell, 2010) and sensory rooms(Cf. Bj{\^o}rkdahl 2015), contributed to higher patient satisfaction and lower rates of violence, seclusion and restraints. This poster describes the preliminary results and the implementations process.AimThe study aim was to 1) reduce the use of coercive measures such as mechanical restraints, 2) redirect agitated, threatening and violent patients toward a calmer personal space, and 3) offer the patients a quiet,clean and relaxing room in the unit where they were able to relax in a ‘staff and co-patient free zone’.MethodA quiet room was implemented at a Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit. The room was designed with relaxing furniture’s such as a comfortable chair, a ‘special calming down chair’, quiet music and nice pictures on the wall. All staff in the unit was taught how and when to utilize the quiet room and all patients enteringthe unit were introduced to the room. The room should be utilized when patients show signs of distress, anger or agitated behavior. In such situations the nurse enters into a dialogue with the patient and offers the quiet room. Furthermore, patients themselves may request to use the quiet room. Study data was collected since September 2014 until September 2015. Data consists of questionnaires with structured and semi-structured questions answered by patients and staff after each use of the room. Further, the use of coercive measures was registered throughout the data collection.Preliminary ResultsUntil now the room was used 150 times for at mean period of 1 hour. 66 different patients used the room between 1 and 5 times. Staff and patients report that coercive measures were avoided, however, we were not able to identify any changes within the registered use of mechanical restraints. Generally, patients experienced great benefits and reported that they appreciated the opportunity to withdraw to a room, which were not their ordinary patient room.Preliminary Conclusion Staff and patients were appreciating the implementation of a quiet room. The concept has been adjusted toward the users’ expectations and we have initiated a longer trial in order to follow the effect on mechanical restraints over a longer period of time. Educational Goals• To understand the implementations process by being aware of the opportunities and challenges within the system• To take note on the difficulties in monitoring effect of altered caring-approaches such as a quiet room",
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Lauge Berring, L, Bonde, SM & Johansen, L 2015, 'Can implementing a quiet room reduce the use of mechanical restraints?' Violence in Clinical Psychiatry, Copenhagen, Danmark, 22/10/2015 - 24/10/2015, .

Can implementing a quiet room reduce the use of mechanical restraints? / Lauge Berring, Lene; Bonde, SM; Johansen, L.

2015. Poster session præsenteret på Violence in Clinical Psychiatry, Copenhagen, Danmark.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskningpeer review

TY - CONF

T1 - Can implementing a quiet room reduce the use of mechanical restraints?

AU - Lauge Berring, Lene

AU - Bonde, SM

AU - Johansen, L

PY - 2015/11/9

Y1 - 2015/11/9

N2 - Background In order to reduce the use of mechanical restraints, this project aimed to implement a Quiet Room in a Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Previous studies has demonstrated that quiet rooms, such ascomfort rooms (Cf. Cummings, Grandfield and Coldwell, 2010) and sensory rooms(Cf. Bjôrkdahl 2015), contributed to higher patient satisfaction and lower rates of violence, seclusion and restraints. This poster describes the preliminary results and the implementations process.AimThe study aim was to 1) reduce the use of coercive measures such as mechanical restraints, 2) redirect agitated, threatening and violent patients toward a calmer personal space, and 3) offer the patients a quiet,clean and relaxing room in the unit where they were able to relax in a ‘staff and co-patient free zone’.MethodA quiet room was implemented at a Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit. The room was designed with relaxing furniture’s such as a comfortable chair, a ‘special calming down chair’, quiet music and nice pictures on the wall. All staff in the unit was taught how and when to utilize the quiet room and all patients enteringthe unit were introduced to the room. The room should be utilized when patients show signs of distress, anger or agitated behavior. In such situations the nurse enters into a dialogue with the patient and offers the quiet room. Furthermore, patients themselves may request to use the quiet room. Study data was collected since September 2014 until September 2015. Data consists of questionnaires with structured and semi-structured questions answered by patients and staff after each use of the room. Further, the use of coercive measures was registered throughout the data collection.Preliminary ResultsUntil now the room was used 150 times for at mean period of 1 hour. 66 different patients used the room between 1 and 5 times. Staff and patients report that coercive measures were avoided, however, we were not able to identify any changes within the registered use of mechanical restraints. Generally, patients experienced great benefits and reported that they appreciated the opportunity to withdraw to a room, which were not their ordinary patient room.Preliminary Conclusion Staff and patients were appreciating the implementation of a quiet room. The concept has been adjusted toward the users’ expectations and we have initiated a longer trial in order to follow the effect on mechanical restraints over a longer period of time. Educational Goals• To understand the implementations process by being aware of the opportunities and challenges within the system• To take note on the difficulties in monitoring effect of altered caring-approaches such as a quiet room

AB - Background In order to reduce the use of mechanical restraints, this project aimed to implement a Quiet Room in a Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Previous studies has demonstrated that quiet rooms, such ascomfort rooms (Cf. Cummings, Grandfield and Coldwell, 2010) and sensory rooms(Cf. Bjôrkdahl 2015), contributed to higher patient satisfaction and lower rates of violence, seclusion and restraints. This poster describes the preliminary results and the implementations process.AimThe study aim was to 1) reduce the use of coercive measures such as mechanical restraints, 2) redirect agitated, threatening and violent patients toward a calmer personal space, and 3) offer the patients a quiet,clean and relaxing room in the unit where they were able to relax in a ‘staff and co-patient free zone’.MethodA quiet room was implemented at a Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit. The room was designed with relaxing furniture’s such as a comfortable chair, a ‘special calming down chair’, quiet music and nice pictures on the wall. All staff in the unit was taught how and when to utilize the quiet room and all patients enteringthe unit were introduced to the room. The room should be utilized when patients show signs of distress, anger or agitated behavior. In such situations the nurse enters into a dialogue with the patient and offers the quiet room. Furthermore, patients themselves may request to use the quiet room. Study data was collected since September 2014 until September 2015. Data consists of questionnaires with structured and semi-structured questions answered by patients and staff after each use of the room. Further, the use of coercive measures was registered throughout the data collection.Preliminary ResultsUntil now the room was used 150 times for at mean period of 1 hour. 66 different patients used the room between 1 and 5 times. Staff and patients report that coercive measures were avoided, however, we were not able to identify any changes within the registered use of mechanical restraints. Generally, patients experienced great benefits and reported that they appreciated the opportunity to withdraw to a room, which were not their ordinary patient room.Preliminary Conclusion Staff and patients were appreciating the implementation of a quiet room. The concept has been adjusted toward the users’ expectations and we have initiated a longer trial in order to follow the effect on mechanical restraints over a longer period of time. Educational Goals• To understand the implementations process by being aware of the opportunities and challenges within the system• To take note on the difficulties in monitoring effect of altered caring-approaches such as a quiet room

M3 - Poster

ER -

Lauge Berring L, Bonde SM, Johansen L. Can implementing a quiet room reduce the use of mechanical restraints?. 2015. Poster session præsenteret på Violence in Clinical Psychiatry, Copenhagen, Danmark.