Bone disease in diabetes

Another manifestation of microvascular disease?

Vikram V. Shanbhogue*, Stinus Hansen, Morten Frost, Kim Brixen, Anne P. Hermann

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are generally accepted to be associated with increased bone fracture risk. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetic bone disease are poorly understood, and whether the associated increased skeletal fragility is a comorbidity or a complication of diabetes remains under debate. Although there is some indication of a direct deleterious effect of microangiopathy on bone, the evidence is open to question, and whether diabetic osteopathy can be classified as a chronic, microvascular complication of diabetes remains uncertain. Here, we review the current knowledge of potential contributory factors to diabetic bone disease, particularly the association between diabetic microangiopathy and bone mineral density, bone structure, and bone turnover. Additionally, we discuss and propose a pathophysiological model of the effects of diabetic microvascular disease on bone, and examine the progression of bone disease alongside the evolution of diabetes.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology
Vol/bind5
Udgave nummer10
Sider (fra-til)827-838
ISSN2213-8587
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Fingeraftryk

Diabetes Complications
Bone Fractures
Bone Density
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Comorbidity

Citer dette

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title = "Bone disease in diabetes: Another manifestation of microvascular disease?",
abstract = "Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are generally accepted to be associated with increased bone fracture risk. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetic bone disease are poorly understood, and whether the associated increased skeletal fragility is a comorbidity or a complication of diabetes remains under debate. Although there is some indication of a direct deleterious effect of microangiopathy on bone, the evidence is open to question, and whether diabetic osteopathy can be classified as a chronic, microvascular complication of diabetes remains uncertain. Here, we review the current knowledge of potential contributory factors to diabetic bone disease, particularly the association between diabetic microangiopathy and bone mineral density, bone structure, and bone turnover. Additionally, we discuss and propose a pathophysiological model of the effects of diabetic microvascular disease on bone, and examine the progression of bone disease alongside the evolution of diabetes.",
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Bone disease in diabetes : Another manifestation of microvascular disease? / Shanbhogue, Vikram V.; Hansen, Stinus; Frost, Morten; Brixen, Kim; Hermann, Anne P.

I: The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, Bind 5, Nr. 10, 2017, s. 827-838.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bone disease in diabetes

T2 - Another manifestation of microvascular disease?

AU - Shanbhogue, Vikram V.

AU - Hansen, Stinus

AU - Frost, Morten

AU - Brixen, Kim

AU - Hermann, Anne P.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are generally accepted to be associated with increased bone fracture risk. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetic bone disease are poorly understood, and whether the associated increased skeletal fragility is a comorbidity or a complication of diabetes remains under debate. Although there is some indication of a direct deleterious effect of microangiopathy on bone, the evidence is open to question, and whether diabetic osteopathy can be classified as a chronic, microvascular complication of diabetes remains uncertain. Here, we review the current knowledge of potential contributory factors to diabetic bone disease, particularly the association between diabetic microangiopathy and bone mineral density, bone structure, and bone turnover. Additionally, we discuss and propose a pathophysiological model of the effects of diabetic microvascular disease on bone, and examine the progression of bone disease alongside the evolution of diabetes.

AB - Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are generally accepted to be associated with increased bone fracture risk. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetic bone disease are poorly understood, and whether the associated increased skeletal fragility is a comorbidity or a complication of diabetes remains under debate. Although there is some indication of a direct deleterious effect of microangiopathy on bone, the evidence is open to question, and whether diabetic osteopathy can be classified as a chronic, microvascular complication of diabetes remains uncertain. Here, we review the current knowledge of potential contributory factors to diabetic bone disease, particularly the association between diabetic microangiopathy and bone mineral density, bone structure, and bone turnover. Additionally, we discuss and propose a pathophysiological model of the effects of diabetic microvascular disease on bone, and examine the progression of bone disease alongside the evolution of diabetes.

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DO - 10.1016/S2213-8587(17)30134-1

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JO - The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology

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