Biorefineries for chemical and biofuel production

Lene Fjerbæk Søtoft

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskning

Resumé

 

Today sustainability, production potential and politics i.e. taxation, subsidies and ethical concerns are hot topics within renewable energy from biomass. Decision making in this area is complicated and decisions are influenced by both the history of the data behind the decisions and the background of the decision maker. An important issue is to ensure that all knowledge is taken into account when analysing whole-crop and complete production systems in stead of only using results from few studies of more limited scope.

A way to improve our knowledge base regarding the use of food or feed crops for biofuel production is research in biorefineries using a whole-crop approach with the aim of having an optimal use of all the components of the specific crop. Looking at rape as a model crop, the components can be used for i.e. bioethanol, biodiesel, biogas, biohydrogen, feed, food and plant protecting agents. This combined with optimization of crop production logistics is a more realistic approach for the near future than only looking at i.e. production of bioethanol from straw.

The approach can then be transferred to other energy crops such as willow or algae. Algae do not compete with traditional land based food or feed crops, but can be grown to produce oil or biomass for biofuels as well as a long range of products with huge potential as food, feed or nutritionals. This with smaller requirements towards feed nutrients and land use.

Value:

If biofuels are to be used as a substitute for fossil fuel, the efficiency of the production process and product use must be increased substantially for the process to pay off as well economically as environmentally. Our knowledge base must thus be expanded and improved to include large production systems of i.e. whole-crop systems. Such research will bring forth new knowledge on biorefineries and help decision makers in their assessment of the potential of biofuels in our future.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato2008
StatusUdgivet - 2008
BegivenhedNordic Climate Solutions - Copenhagen, Danmark
Varighed: 25. nov. 200826. nov. 2008
Konferencens nummer: 1

Konference

KonferenceNordic Climate Solutions
Nummer1
LandDanmark
ByCopenhagen
Periode25/11/200826/11/2008

Fingeraftryk

biorefining
biofuels
algae
crops
energy crops
production technology
biohydrogen
feed requirements
bioethanol
politics
biomass
crop models
fossil fuels
biogas
taxes
renewable energy sources
biodiesel
ethanol production
subsidies
crop production

Emneord

  • Bioraffinaderi
  • Biobrændsler
  • Bioenergi
  • valg af afgrøde
  • Fornybar energi

Citer dette

Fjerbæk Søtoft, L. (2008). Biorefineries for chemical and biofuel production. Abstract fra Nordic Climate Solutions, Copenhagen, Danmark.
Fjerbæk Søtoft, Lene. / Biorefineries for chemical and biofuel production. Abstract fra Nordic Climate Solutions, Copenhagen, Danmark.
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Fjerbæk Søtoft, L 2008, 'Biorefineries for chemical and biofuel production', Nordic Climate Solutions, Copenhagen, Danmark, 25/11/2008 - 26/11/2008.

Biorefineries for chemical and biofuel production. / Fjerbæk Søtoft, Lene.

2008. Abstract fra Nordic Climate Solutions, Copenhagen, Danmark.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskning

TY - ABST

T1 - Biorefineries for chemical and biofuel production

AU - Fjerbæk Søtoft, Lene

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 -   Today sustainability, production potential and politics i.e. taxation, subsidies and ethical concerns are hot topics within renewable energy from biomass. Decision making in this area is complicated and decisions are influenced by both the history of the data behind the decisions and the background of the decision maker. An important issue is to ensure that all knowledge is taken into account when analysing whole-crop and complete production systems in stead of only using results from few studies of more limited scope.A way to improve our knowledge base regarding the use of food or feed crops for biofuel production is research in biorefineries using a whole-crop approach with the aim of having an optimal use of all the components of the specific crop. Looking at rape as a model crop, the components can be used for i.e. bioethanol, biodiesel, biogas, biohydrogen, feed, food and plant protecting agents. This combined with optimization of crop production logistics is a more realistic approach for the near future than only looking at i.e. production of bioethanol from straw.The approach can then be transferred to other energy crops such as willow or algae. Algae do not compete with traditional land based food or feed crops, but can be grown to produce oil or biomass for biofuels as well as a long range of products with huge potential as food, feed or nutritionals. This with smaller requirements towards feed nutrients and land use.Value:If biofuels are to be used as a substitute for fossil fuel, the efficiency of the production process and product use must be increased substantially for the process to pay off as well economically as environmentally. Our knowledge base must thus be expanded and improved to include large production systems of i.e. whole-crop systems. Such research will bring forth new knowledge on biorefineries and help decision makers in their assessment of the potential of biofuels in our future.

AB -   Today sustainability, production potential and politics i.e. taxation, subsidies and ethical concerns are hot topics within renewable energy from biomass. Decision making in this area is complicated and decisions are influenced by both the history of the data behind the decisions and the background of the decision maker. An important issue is to ensure that all knowledge is taken into account when analysing whole-crop and complete production systems in stead of only using results from few studies of more limited scope.A way to improve our knowledge base regarding the use of food or feed crops for biofuel production is research in biorefineries using a whole-crop approach with the aim of having an optimal use of all the components of the specific crop. Looking at rape as a model crop, the components can be used for i.e. bioethanol, biodiesel, biogas, biohydrogen, feed, food and plant protecting agents. This combined with optimization of crop production logistics is a more realistic approach for the near future than only looking at i.e. production of bioethanol from straw.The approach can then be transferred to other energy crops such as willow or algae. Algae do not compete with traditional land based food or feed crops, but can be grown to produce oil or biomass for biofuels as well as a long range of products with huge potential as food, feed or nutritionals. This with smaller requirements towards feed nutrients and land use.Value:If biofuels are to be used as a substitute for fossil fuel, the efficiency of the production process and product use must be increased substantially for the process to pay off as well economically as environmentally. Our knowledge base must thus be expanded and improved to include large production systems of i.e. whole-crop systems. Such research will bring forth new knowledge on biorefineries and help decision makers in their assessment of the potential of biofuels in our future.

KW - Bioraffinaderi

KW - Biobrændsler

KW - Bioenergi

KW - valg af afgrøde

KW - Fornybar energi

KW - Biorefinery

KW - Biofuels

KW - Bioenergy

KW - crop choice

KW - Renewables

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -

Fjerbæk Søtoft L. Biorefineries for chemical and biofuel production. 2008. Abstract fra Nordic Climate Solutions, Copenhagen, Danmark.