Biogenic Fe(III) minerals

From formation to diagenesis and preservation in the rock record

Nicole Posth, Donald Eugene Canfield, Andreas Kappler

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

Resumé

Fe-metabolizing bacteria are intimately linked to the cycling of Fe in modern environments and have likely been key players in the evolution of the Earth's biogeosphere. Fe minerals have also been suggested as a key preservative of cell organic matter in sediments, keeping otherwise labile phases conserved at least on time scales of 100,000 years. The interpretation of a biological influence on the Fe rock record is difficult without a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of biogenic Fe(III) and Fe(II) mineral formation, the character of these minerals, and their diagenesis over short and long time scales. Here, we present the recent advances in the study of abiogenic and biogenic Fe(III) minerals. In particular, we focus on the role of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria in the deposition of ancient banded iron formations (BIF). We discuss this work within the framework of the main challenge: separating biogenic from abiogenic processes over deep time. We describe how efforts in isotope geochemistry, biomarker research, mineral analysis and biogeochemistry are helping to establish a window to the past. Finally, we present some new approaches that help investigate the main processes leading to the formation and potential fate of Fe-organic matter aggregates.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEarth-Science Reviews
Vol/bind135
Sider (fra-til)103-121
ISSN0012-8252
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2014

Fingeraftryk

diagenesis
mineral
rock
timescale
organic matter
banded iron formation
bacterium
preservative
biogeochemistry
biomarker
geochemistry
isotope
sediment

Citer dette

@article{287ef67bbce7460794310a9ec524db2e,
title = "Biogenic Fe(III) minerals: From formation to diagenesis and preservation in the rock record",
abstract = "Fe-metabolizing bacteria are intimately linked to the cycling of Fe in modern environments and have likely been key players in the evolution of the Earth's biogeosphere. Fe minerals have also been suggested as a key preservative of cell organic matter in sediments, keeping otherwise labile phases conserved at least on time scales of 100,000 years. The interpretation of a biological influence on the Fe rock record is difficult without a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of biogenic Fe(III) and Fe(II) mineral formation, the character of these minerals, and their diagenesis over short and long time scales. Here, we present the recent advances in the study of abiogenic and biogenic Fe(III) minerals. In particular, we focus on the role of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria in the deposition of ancient banded iron formations (BIF). We discuss this work within the framework of the main challenge: separating biogenic from abiogenic processes over deep time. We describe how efforts in isotope geochemistry, biomarker research, mineral analysis and biogeochemistry are helping to establish a window to the past. Finally, we present some new approaches that help investigate the main processes leading to the formation and potential fate of Fe-organic matter aggregates.",
author = "Nicole Posth and Canfield, {Donald Eugene} and Andreas Kappler",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1016/j.earscirev.2014.03.012",
language = "English",
volume = "135",
pages = "103--121",
journal = "Earth-Science Reviews",
issn = "0012-8252",
publisher = "Heinemann",

}

Biogenic Fe(III) minerals : From formation to diagenesis and preservation in the rock record. / Posth, Nicole; Canfield, Donald Eugene; Kappler, Andreas.

I: Earth-Science Reviews, Bind 135, 2014, s. 103-121.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Biogenic Fe(III) minerals

T2 - From formation to diagenesis and preservation in the rock record

AU - Posth, Nicole

AU - Canfield, Donald Eugene

AU - Kappler, Andreas

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Fe-metabolizing bacteria are intimately linked to the cycling of Fe in modern environments and have likely been key players in the evolution of the Earth's biogeosphere. Fe minerals have also been suggested as a key preservative of cell organic matter in sediments, keeping otherwise labile phases conserved at least on time scales of 100,000 years. The interpretation of a biological influence on the Fe rock record is difficult without a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of biogenic Fe(III) and Fe(II) mineral formation, the character of these minerals, and their diagenesis over short and long time scales. Here, we present the recent advances in the study of abiogenic and biogenic Fe(III) minerals. In particular, we focus on the role of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria in the deposition of ancient banded iron formations (BIF). We discuss this work within the framework of the main challenge: separating biogenic from abiogenic processes over deep time. We describe how efforts in isotope geochemistry, biomarker research, mineral analysis and biogeochemistry are helping to establish a window to the past. Finally, we present some new approaches that help investigate the main processes leading to the formation and potential fate of Fe-organic matter aggregates.

AB - Fe-metabolizing bacteria are intimately linked to the cycling of Fe in modern environments and have likely been key players in the evolution of the Earth's biogeosphere. Fe minerals have also been suggested as a key preservative of cell organic matter in sediments, keeping otherwise labile phases conserved at least on time scales of 100,000 years. The interpretation of a biological influence on the Fe rock record is difficult without a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of biogenic Fe(III) and Fe(II) mineral formation, the character of these minerals, and their diagenesis over short and long time scales. Here, we present the recent advances in the study of abiogenic and biogenic Fe(III) minerals. In particular, we focus on the role of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria in the deposition of ancient banded iron formations (BIF). We discuss this work within the framework of the main challenge: separating biogenic from abiogenic processes over deep time. We describe how efforts in isotope geochemistry, biomarker research, mineral analysis and biogeochemistry are helping to establish a window to the past. Finally, we present some new approaches that help investigate the main processes leading to the formation and potential fate of Fe-organic matter aggregates.

U2 - 10.1016/j.earscirev.2014.03.012

DO - 10.1016/j.earscirev.2014.03.012

M3 - Review

VL - 135

SP - 103

EP - 121

JO - Earth-Science Reviews

JF - Earth-Science Reviews

SN - 0012-8252

ER -