Beyond Safe Operating Space: Finding Chemical Footprinting Feasible

Leo Posthuma, Anders Bjørn, Michiel C. Zijp, Morten Birkved, Miriam L. Diamond, Michael Zwicky Hauschild, Mark A. J. Huijbregts, Christian Mulder, Dik Van de Meent

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Environmental overshoot occurs when human demands exceed the biosphere’s regenerative capacities. Earth Overshoot Day (EOD) marks the day that humanity’s footprint exhausts the Earth’s annual regenerative capacity. The EOD of 2013, on August 20th, was memorable for the f irst author as it fell on his mother’s 89th birthday. Each EOD, falling earlier every year, confronts us with urgent environmental problems, some of which are poorly defined. One such example is chemical pollution, which threatens the Earth’s capacities. Rockström et al. listed chemical pollution as an important but yet undefined boundary in their selection of planetary boundaries delineating the “safe operating space for humanity”. Can we use the well-known concept of “ecological footprints” to express a chemical pollution boundary aimed at preventing the overshoot of the Earth’s capacity to assimilate environmental pollution? Current literature is replete with ideas on this, and shows the benefits of trans-disciplinary collaborations. Borrowing our subtitle from Don Mackay’s seminal paper that introduced fugacity-based modeling for quantifying the environmental distribution of chemicals,3 we now see the development of chemical footprinting that is feasible, relevant, and necessary for expressing the overshoot of the Earth’s capacity. With widespread “chemical overshoot” leading to adverse effects of pollution, we argue for implementing a solution-focused assessment paradigm: Chemical footprinting helps identify scenarios that allow us to avoid “chemical overshoot” beyond the Earth’s safe operating space.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEnvironmental Science & Technology (Washington)
Vol/bind48
Udgave nummer11
Sider (fra-til)6057–6059
ISSN0013-936X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2014
Udgivet eksterntJa

Citer dette

Posthuma, L., Bjørn, A., Zijp, M. C., Birkved, M., Diamond, M. L., Hauschild, M. Z., ... Van de Meent, D. (2014). Beyond Safe Operating Space: Finding Chemical Footprinting Feasible. Environmental Science & Technology (Washington), 48(11), 6057–6059. https://doi.org/10.1021/es501961k
Posthuma, Leo ; Bjørn, Anders ; Zijp, Michiel C. ; Birkved, Morten ; Diamond, Miriam L. ; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky ; Huijbregts, Mark A. J. ; Mulder, Christian ; Van de Meent, Dik. / Beyond Safe Operating Space: Finding Chemical Footprinting Feasible. I: Environmental Science & Technology (Washington). 2014 ; Bind 48, Nr. 11. s. 6057–6059.
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abstract = "Environmental overshoot occurs when human demands exceed the biosphere’s regenerative capacities. Earth Overshoot Day (EOD) marks the day that humanity’s footprint exhausts the Earth’s annual regenerative capacity. The EOD of 2013, on August 20th, was memorable for the f irst author as it fell on his mother’s 89th birthday. Each EOD, falling earlier every year, confronts us with urgent environmental problems, some of which are poorly defined. One such example is chemical pollution, which threatens the Earth’s capacities. Rockström et al. listed chemical pollution as an important but yet undefined boundary in their selection of planetary boundaries delineating the “safe operating space for humanity”. Can we use the well-known concept of “ecological footprints” to express a chemical pollution boundary aimed at preventing the overshoot of the Earth’s capacity to assimilate environmental pollution? Current literature is replete with ideas on this, and shows the benefits of trans-disciplinary collaborations. Borrowing our subtitle from Don Mackay’s seminal paper that introduced fugacity-based modeling for quantifying the environmental distribution of chemicals,3 we now see the development of chemical footprinting that is feasible, relevant, and necessary for expressing the overshoot of the Earth’s capacity. With widespread “chemical overshoot” leading to adverse effects of pollution, we argue for implementing a solution-focused assessment paradigm: Chemical footprinting helps identify scenarios that allow us to avoid “chemical overshoot” beyond the Earth’s safe operating space.",
author = "Leo Posthuma and Anders Bj{\o}rn and Zijp, {Michiel C.} and Morten Birkved and Diamond, {Miriam L.} and Hauschild, {Michael Zwicky} and Huijbregts, {Mark A. J.} and Christian Mulder and {Van de Meent}, Dik",
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Posthuma, L, Bjørn, A, Zijp, MC, Birkved, M, Diamond, ML, Hauschild, MZ, Huijbregts, MAJ, Mulder, C & Van de Meent, D 2014, 'Beyond Safe Operating Space: Finding Chemical Footprinting Feasible', Environmental Science & Technology (Washington), bind 48, nr. 11, s. 6057–6059. https://doi.org/10.1021/es501961k

Beyond Safe Operating Space: Finding Chemical Footprinting Feasible. / Posthuma, Leo; Bjørn, Anders; Zijp, Michiel C.; Birkved, Morten; Diamond, Miriam L.; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Huijbregts, Mark A. J.; Mulder, Christian; Van de Meent, Dik.

I: Environmental Science & Technology (Washington), Bind 48, Nr. 11, 2014, s. 6057–6059.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Beyond Safe Operating Space: Finding Chemical Footprinting Feasible

AU - Posthuma, Leo

AU - Bjørn, Anders

AU - Zijp, Michiel C.

AU - Birkved, Morten

AU - Diamond, Miriam L.

AU - Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

AU - Huijbregts, Mark A. J.

AU - Mulder, Christian

AU - Van de Meent, Dik

PY - 2014

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N2 - Environmental overshoot occurs when human demands exceed the biosphere’s regenerative capacities. Earth Overshoot Day (EOD) marks the day that humanity’s footprint exhausts the Earth’s annual regenerative capacity. The EOD of 2013, on August 20th, was memorable for the f irst author as it fell on his mother’s 89th birthday. Each EOD, falling earlier every year, confronts us with urgent environmental problems, some of which are poorly defined. One such example is chemical pollution, which threatens the Earth’s capacities. Rockström et al. listed chemical pollution as an important but yet undefined boundary in their selection of planetary boundaries delineating the “safe operating space for humanity”. Can we use the well-known concept of “ecological footprints” to express a chemical pollution boundary aimed at preventing the overshoot of the Earth’s capacity to assimilate environmental pollution? Current literature is replete with ideas on this, and shows the benefits of trans-disciplinary collaborations. Borrowing our subtitle from Don Mackay’s seminal paper that introduced fugacity-based modeling for quantifying the environmental distribution of chemicals,3 we now see the development of chemical footprinting that is feasible, relevant, and necessary for expressing the overshoot of the Earth’s capacity. With widespread “chemical overshoot” leading to adverse effects of pollution, we argue for implementing a solution-focused assessment paradigm: Chemical footprinting helps identify scenarios that allow us to avoid “chemical overshoot” beyond the Earth’s safe operating space.

AB - Environmental overshoot occurs when human demands exceed the biosphere’s regenerative capacities. Earth Overshoot Day (EOD) marks the day that humanity’s footprint exhausts the Earth’s annual regenerative capacity. The EOD of 2013, on August 20th, was memorable for the f irst author as it fell on his mother’s 89th birthday. Each EOD, falling earlier every year, confronts us with urgent environmental problems, some of which are poorly defined. One such example is chemical pollution, which threatens the Earth’s capacities. Rockström et al. listed chemical pollution as an important but yet undefined boundary in their selection of planetary boundaries delineating the “safe operating space for humanity”. Can we use the well-known concept of “ecological footprints” to express a chemical pollution boundary aimed at preventing the overshoot of the Earth’s capacity to assimilate environmental pollution? Current literature is replete with ideas on this, and shows the benefits of trans-disciplinary collaborations. Borrowing our subtitle from Don Mackay’s seminal paper that introduced fugacity-based modeling for quantifying the environmental distribution of chemicals,3 we now see the development of chemical footprinting that is feasible, relevant, and necessary for expressing the overshoot of the Earth’s capacity. With widespread “chemical overshoot” leading to adverse effects of pollution, we argue for implementing a solution-focused assessment paradigm: Chemical footprinting helps identify scenarios that allow us to avoid “chemical overshoot” beyond the Earth’s safe operating space.

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DO - 10.1021/es501961k

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JO - Environmental Science & Technology (Washington)

JF - Environmental Science & Technology (Washington)

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