Bed Bath with Soap and Water or Disposable Wet Wipes

Patients' Experiences and Preferences

Pia L Veje*, Ming Chen, Christian S Jensen, Jan Sørensen, Jette Primdahl

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To gain an in-depth understanding of patients' preferences regarding two bed bath methods: soap and water and disposable wet wipes.

BACKGROUND: Bed baths allow hospitalized, bedridden patients to stay clean and fresh. They serve a number of purposes: health promotion, social propriety and pure pleasure. Traditionally, soap and water has been used for personal hygiene, but in recent years soap and water have increasingly been replaced by the use of disposable wet wipes.

DESIGN: A qualitative study with a hermeneutical-phenomenological approach was chosen to explore and understand patients' experiences of bed bath methods.

METHODS: Semi-structured, individual, in-depth interviews with 16 bedridden patients from three wards were conducted. The software program NVivo was used to structure the transcribed interviews and assist in the initial data analysis. The data were analyzed and interpreted within a phenomenological-hermeneutical framework. COREQ guidelines were used in the preparation of this paper. (See Supplementary File 1) RESULTS: Four overall themes were identified: "Creating a sense of cleanliness", "Preferences and concerns in different situations", "Cleanliness of hands and face" and "Clinical decision making about bed bath method".

CONCLUSION: Overall, patients' bed bath preference was for soap and water, but disposable wet wipes was considered a convenient alternative and preferred in certain circumstances, e.g., when a patient had pain or diarrhea. Shared decision making regarding bed bath method is recommended. Hands and face had specific requirements.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nursing staff should be aware that bedridden patients have varying preferences, and it is important to incorporate the patients' preferences in the development of standards, health policies and clinical guidelines for bed bath practices. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Clinical Nursing
Vol/bind28
Udgave nummer11-12
Sider (fra-til)2235-2244
ISSN0962-1067
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jun. 2019

Fingeraftryk

Soaps
Patient Preference
Guidelines
Interviews
Pleasure
Nursing Staff
Health Policy
Health Promotion

Citer dette

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title = "Bed Bath with Soap and Water or Disposable Wet Wipes: Patients' Experiences and Preferences",
abstract = "AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To gain an in-depth understanding of patients' preferences regarding two bed bath methods: soap and water and disposable wet wipes.BACKGROUND: Bed baths allow hospitalized, bedridden patients to stay clean and fresh. They serve a number of purposes: health promotion, social propriety and pure pleasure. Traditionally, soap and water has been used for personal hygiene, but in recent years soap and water have increasingly been replaced by the use of disposable wet wipes.DESIGN: A qualitative study with a hermeneutical-phenomenological approach was chosen to explore and understand patients' experiences of bed bath methods.METHODS: Semi-structured, individual, in-depth interviews with 16 bedridden patients from three wards were conducted. The software program NVivo was used to structure the transcribed interviews and assist in the initial data analysis. The data were analyzed and interpreted within a phenomenological-hermeneutical framework. COREQ guidelines were used in the preparation of this paper. (See Supplementary File 1) RESULTS: Four overall themes were identified: {"}Creating a sense of cleanliness{"}, {"}Preferences and concerns in different situations{"}, {"}Cleanliness of hands and face{"} and {"}Clinical decision making about bed bath method{"}.CONCLUSION: Overall, patients' bed bath preference was for soap and water, but disposable wet wipes was considered a convenient alternative and preferred in certain circumstances, e.g., when a patient had pain or diarrhea. Shared decision making regarding bed bath method is recommended. Hands and face had specific requirements.RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nursing staff should be aware that bedridden patients have varying preferences, and it is important to incorporate the patients' preferences in the development of standards, health policies and clinical guidelines for bed bath practices. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "bedridden, disposable wipes, hermeneutic, patient experience, personal hygiene, phenomenology, qualitative interviews, Decision Making, Water, Humans, Male, Patient Preference, Soaps, Baths/methods, Adult, Female, Qualitative Research",
author = "Veje, {Pia L} and Ming Chen and Jensen, {Christian S} and Jan S{\o}rensen and Jette Primdahl",
note = "This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1111/jocn.14825",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "2235--2244",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Nursing",
issn = "0962-1067",
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Bed Bath with Soap and Water or Disposable Wet Wipes : Patients' Experiences and Preferences. / Veje, Pia L; Chen, Ming; Jensen, Christian S; Sørensen, Jan; Primdahl, Jette.

I: Journal of Clinical Nursing, Bind 28, Nr. 11-12, 06.2019, s. 2235-2244.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bed Bath with Soap and Water or Disposable Wet Wipes

T2 - Patients' Experiences and Preferences

AU - Veje, Pia L

AU - Chen, Ming

AU - Jensen, Christian S

AU - Sørensen, Jan

AU - Primdahl, Jette

N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/6

Y1 - 2019/6

N2 - AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To gain an in-depth understanding of patients' preferences regarding two bed bath methods: soap and water and disposable wet wipes.BACKGROUND: Bed baths allow hospitalized, bedridden patients to stay clean and fresh. They serve a number of purposes: health promotion, social propriety and pure pleasure. Traditionally, soap and water has been used for personal hygiene, but in recent years soap and water have increasingly been replaced by the use of disposable wet wipes.DESIGN: A qualitative study with a hermeneutical-phenomenological approach was chosen to explore and understand patients' experiences of bed bath methods.METHODS: Semi-structured, individual, in-depth interviews with 16 bedridden patients from three wards were conducted. The software program NVivo was used to structure the transcribed interviews and assist in the initial data analysis. The data were analyzed and interpreted within a phenomenological-hermeneutical framework. COREQ guidelines were used in the preparation of this paper. (See Supplementary File 1) RESULTS: Four overall themes were identified: "Creating a sense of cleanliness", "Preferences and concerns in different situations", "Cleanliness of hands and face" and "Clinical decision making about bed bath method".CONCLUSION: Overall, patients' bed bath preference was for soap and water, but disposable wet wipes was considered a convenient alternative and preferred in certain circumstances, e.g., when a patient had pain or diarrhea. Shared decision making regarding bed bath method is recommended. Hands and face had specific requirements.RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nursing staff should be aware that bedridden patients have varying preferences, and it is important to incorporate the patients' preferences in the development of standards, health policies and clinical guidelines for bed bath practices. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

AB - AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To gain an in-depth understanding of patients' preferences regarding two bed bath methods: soap and water and disposable wet wipes.BACKGROUND: Bed baths allow hospitalized, bedridden patients to stay clean and fresh. They serve a number of purposes: health promotion, social propriety and pure pleasure. Traditionally, soap and water has been used for personal hygiene, but in recent years soap and water have increasingly been replaced by the use of disposable wet wipes.DESIGN: A qualitative study with a hermeneutical-phenomenological approach was chosen to explore and understand patients' experiences of bed bath methods.METHODS: Semi-structured, individual, in-depth interviews with 16 bedridden patients from three wards were conducted. The software program NVivo was used to structure the transcribed interviews and assist in the initial data analysis. The data were analyzed and interpreted within a phenomenological-hermeneutical framework. COREQ guidelines were used in the preparation of this paper. (See Supplementary File 1) RESULTS: Four overall themes were identified: "Creating a sense of cleanliness", "Preferences and concerns in different situations", "Cleanliness of hands and face" and "Clinical decision making about bed bath method".CONCLUSION: Overall, patients' bed bath preference was for soap and water, but disposable wet wipes was considered a convenient alternative and preferred in certain circumstances, e.g., when a patient had pain or diarrhea. Shared decision making regarding bed bath method is recommended. Hands and face had specific requirements.RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nursing staff should be aware that bedridden patients have varying preferences, and it is important to incorporate the patients' preferences in the development of standards, health policies and clinical guidelines for bed bath practices. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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KW - disposable wipes

KW - hermeneutic

KW - patient experience

KW - personal hygiene

KW - phenomenology

KW - qualitative interviews

KW - Decision Making

KW - Water

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Patient Preference

KW - Soaps

KW - Baths/methods

KW - Adult

KW - Female

KW - Qualitative Research

U2 - 10.1111/jocn.14825

DO - 10.1111/jocn.14825

M3 - Journal article

VL - 28

SP - 2235

EP - 2244

JO - Journal of Clinical Nursing

JF - Journal of Clinical Nursing

SN - 0962-1067

IS - 11-12

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