At hedde et billede

En undersøgelse af betydningsdannelsen i logotyper

Publikation: Working paperForskning

302 Downloads (Pure)

Resumé

Summary

This is a theory-based thesis, which investigates corporate logotypes as a means of communication.
The investigation is conducted within the overall theoretic framework of Systemic Functional
Linguistics, in the interpretation of Danish Linguists: Thomas Lund Andersen, Uwe Helm Petersen
and Flemming Smedegaard (2001), in extension of MAK. Halliday (1994, 1999) and Christian
Mathiessen (1999). In order to obtain the richest detail in the investigation, the semiotic and cognitive approaches on
language (Roland Barthes, 1996; Umberto Eco, 1976) (Mark Turner, 1991, 1998, 2000; Gilles
Faucounnier, 1994, 1998) as well as the sociological and symbolistic approaches on organisations
(Niklas Luhmann, 1988, 1999, 2000) (Majken Schultz, Mary Jo Hatch, 2000) are taken into account
within the Systemic Functional frame. The investigation launches from an introductory historical account, which describes how four leaps can be observed in the development of the logotype. These developmental leaps are closely related to the simultaneous development of the surrounding society and its means of communication: Book
printing, national mass-medias, global mass-medias and the Internet. Also, the thesis links the
communicative development of the logotype with the recent recognition of a brand’s ability to
generate and accumulate economical value within an organisation.
The creation of meaning is the focus of the thesis, which proposes a model of “Semantic Space”.

The model recognizes the illusive nature of semantic processes, as well as the complex dual nature
of logotype-specific semantics, which is based upon elements from both visual and verbal semiotic
systems. “Semantic Space” is an abstraction, based on the mutual position of seven semantic
mechanisms in the space between semantic and semiotic abstraction. The term “Black Box” is used
about the most illusive parts of Semantic Space, which contains semantic mechanisms that can
never be subject to observation. The proposed model gives an overview and heightened
understanding of the mutual parts played by the semantic mechanisms in the construction of
meaning – whether observable or not.
The model is based on the idea of input into- and output from the semantic stratum. Contextual
structures are the input to the semantic process, which in turn outputs expressions. The thesis
discusses output and input respectively in parts Two and Three, and combines its observations in
part Four, which deals with semantics.
The output from Semantic Space is realised by the lexico-grammar of the logotypes. This part of the
thesis rests on the overall Systemic Functional frame. Applying Systemic Functional Linguistics on
a hitherto uncharted semiotic system poses certain dangers; in order to avoid creating a grammatical
mirror-image of verbal grammar in observation of logotypes, the specific meta-functions are
initially reduced to their essence, then used as the base upon which a logotype-specific grammar is
created.
Logotypes transfer the essence of experiential meaning, which is facts and experiences, logical
meaning through interdependency, interpersonal meaning through intersubjectivity and textual
meaning through structure. The description of the four meta-functions in relation to logotypes, has
resulted in systems which embrace all articulations of the four types of meaning.
Part Three of the thesis establishes the discourse of the logotype. The compatibility of the applied
theories is tested, before they are put to use. Based on the work of German sociologist Niklas
Luhmann, the necessity of means of communication such as logotypes in a hyper complex society is
proposed. This part of the thesis argues that logotypes are a necessary means of reducing
complexity, in consequence of the steadily increasing pressure of complexity, modern man faces.
This fact establishes a relation between the amount of attention the logotypes receive and the ever
increasing complexity in society.
Based on the theory of Social Systems, this part of the thesis also establishes a new understanding
of the terms “internal” and “external” in relation to organisations. Albeit the new understanding is
merely an extension of its predecessor, it reflects the dynamics characteristic to these terms. Hence,
new light, which reveals the impact of this dynamic on the use and effect of logotypes, is shed on
the discourse.
Traditional semiotics and symbolistic organizational theory is applied, in order to explain the way
logotypes work as an anchor point for organizational storytelling and myth. These discoveries are
supplemented with a cognitive perspective, to reveal the way corporate stories and myths along
with logotypes each supply input spaces for a blended space, which insures long term connections
between story and logotype.
The efficiency of the communication and the life span of the logotype depend on four
interconnected developments, each within its own timeframe. The concepts of Generation and
semogenesis allow us to observe the part of the process of creating meaning, which is sparked in the
space between the expression and the development of language, language-user and sign
respectively. The first three time frames have been introduced by Halliday and Mathiessen. The
last, endo-semogentic, time frame has been developed within this thesis, specifically for use with
logotypes. These semo-genetic time frames are crucial to understanding temporal implications of
the creation of menaning.
Having established a more richly detailed and faceted understanding of the input and output of
Semantic Space, Part Four of the thesis gathers the threads that have been laid out in the preceding
parts, and proposes a theory of the creation of meaning in logotypes. Because of the illusiveness of
semantics, the thesis is limited to theorizing the semantic mechanisms – but due to the basis, which
has been established in parts Two and Three, the guesswork is inarguably as well qualified as can
be hoped under the circumstances.
The most crucial semantic mechanism, which is introduced in the thesis, is the Symbiosis of Sign
Systems. The thesis describes, the way in which this mechanism allows a verbally and a visually
based system of signs to join in a symbiotic relation, in which the two-stage visual semiotic system
borrows the lexicality of the three-stage verbal semiotic system and helps articulate the
organizational myth within very small means. In turn, the three-stage verbal semiotic system
borrows the ability to make any expression unique from the two-stage visual semiotic system.
Hence, the fast decoding of the visual expression and the broad band with of the verbal semiotic
system are combined.
It is a central point of the thesis, that the organisation is always represented in the logotype through
the name at the same time as the logotype links the organisational myth with the organisation
through metonymical compression.
Hence the title of the thesis: Visual Names.
OriginalsprogDansk
Udgivelses stedOdense
UdgiverInstitute of Language and Communication, University of Southern Denmark
Udgave1
Sider1-186
Antal sider186
ISBN (Elektronisk)87-91724-00-7
StatusUdgivet - 2005

Fingeraftryk

Logotype
Names
Meaning Making
Semantic Space
Communication
Discourse
Niklas Luhmann
Grammar
Language
Visual Semiotics
Essence
Modern Man
World Wide Web
Intersubjectivity
Social Systems
Decoding
Umberto Eco
Life Span
Interpersonal Meaning
Lexicogrammar

Emneord

  • Logotype
  • Logo
  • Figurmærke
  • Systemisk Funktionel Lingvistik

Citer dette

Johannessen, C. M., & Moos, H. G. (2005). At hedde et billede: En undersøgelse af betydningsdannelsen i logotyper. (1 udg.) (s. 1-186). Odense: Institute of Language and Communication, University of Southern Denmark.
Johannessen, Christian Mosbæk ; Moos, Henrik Gedde. / At hedde et billede : En undersøgelse af betydningsdannelsen i logotyper. 1. udg. Odense : Institute of Language and Communication, University of Southern Denmark, 2005. s. 1-186
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abstract = "SummaryThis is a theory-based thesis, which investigates corporate logotypes as a means of communication.The investigation is conducted within the overall theoretic framework of Systemic FunctionalLinguistics, in the interpretation of Danish Linguists: Thomas Lund Andersen, Uwe Helm Petersenand Flemming Smedegaard (2001), in extension of MAK. Halliday (1994, 1999) and ChristianMathiessen (1999). In order to obtain the richest detail in the investigation, the semiotic and cognitive approaches onlanguage (Roland Barthes, 1996; Umberto Eco, 1976) (Mark Turner, 1991, 1998, 2000; GillesFaucounnier, 1994, 1998) as well as the sociological and symbolistic approaches on organisations(Niklas Luhmann, 1988, 1999, 2000) (Majken Schultz, Mary Jo Hatch, 2000) are taken into accountwithin the Systemic Functional frame. The investigation launches from an introductory historical account, which describes how four leaps can be observed in the development of the logotype. These developmental leaps are closely related to the simultaneous development of the surrounding society and its means of communication: Bookprinting, national mass-medias, global mass-medias and the Internet. Also, the thesis links thecommunicative development of the logotype with the recent recognition of a brand’s ability togenerate and accumulate economical value within an organisation.The creation of meaning is the focus of the thesis, which proposes a model of “Semantic Space”.The model recognizes the illusive nature of semantic processes, as well as the complex dual natureof logotype-specific semantics, which is based upon elements from both visual and verbal semioticsystems. “Semantic Space” is an abstraction, based on the mutual position of seven semanticmechanisms in the space between semantic and semiotic abstraction. The term “Black Box” is usedabout the most illusive parts of Semantic Space, which contains semantic mechanisms that cannever be subject to observation. The proposed model gives an overview and heightenedunderstanding of the mutual parts played by the semantic mechanisms in the construction ofmeaning – whether observable or not.The model is based on the idea of input into- and output from the semantic stratum. Contextualstructures are the input to the semantic process, which in turn outputs expressions. The thesisdiscusses output and input respectively in parts Two and Three, and combines its observations inpart Four, which deals with semantics.The output from Semantic Space is realised by the lexico-grammar of the logotypes. This part of thethesis rests on the overall Systemic Functional frame. Applying Systemic Functional Linguistics ona hitherto uncharted semiotic system poses certain dangers; in order to avoid creating a grammaticalmirror-image of verbal grammar in observation of logotypes, the specific meta-functions areinitially reduced to their essence, then used as the base upon which a logotype-specific grammar iscreated.Logotypes transfer the essence of experiential meaning, which is facts and experiences, logicalmeaning through interdependency, interpersonal meaning through intersubjectivity and textualmeaning through structure. The description of the four meta-functions in relation to logotypes, hasresulted in systems which embrace all articulations of the four types of meaning.Part Three of the thesis establishes the discourse of the logotype. The compatibility of the appliedtheories is tested, before they are put to use. Based on the work of German sociologist NiklasLuhmann, the necessity of means of communication such as logotypes in a hyper complex society isproposed. This part of the thesis argues that logotypes are a necessary means of reducingcomplexity, in consequence of the steadily increasing pressure of complexity, modern man faces.This fact establishes a relation between the amount of attention the logotypes receive and the everincreasing complexity in society.Based on the theory of Social Systems, this part of the thesis also establishes a new understandingof the terms “internal” and “external” in relation to organisations. Albeit the new understanding ismerely an extension of its predecessor, it reflects the dynamics characteristic to these terms. Hence,new light, which reveals the impact of this dynamic on the use and effect of logotypes, is shed onthe discourse.Traditional semiotics and symbolistic organizational theory is applied, in order to explain the waylogotypes work as an anchor point for organizational storytelling and myth. These discoveries aresupplemented with a cognitive perspective, to reveal the way corporate stories and myths alongwith logotypes each supply input spaces for a blended space, which insures long term connectionsbetween story and logotype.The efficiency of the communication and the life span of the logotype depend on fourinterconnected developments, each within its own timeframe. The concepts of Generation andsemogenesis allow us to observe the part of the process of creating meaning, which is sparked in thespace between the expression and the development of language, language-user and signrespectively. The first three time frames have been introduced by Halliday and Mathiessen. Thelast, endo-semogentic, time frame has been developed within this thesis, specifically for use withlogotypes. These semo-genetic time frames are crucial to understanding temporal implications ofthe creation of menaning.Having established a more richly detailed and faceted understanding of the input and output ofSemantic Space, Part Four of the thesis gathers the threads that have been laid out in the precedingparts, and proposes a theory of the creation of meaning in logotypes. Because of the illusiveness ofsemantics, the thesis is limited to theorizing the semantic mechanisms – but due to the basis, whichhas been established in parts Two and Three, the guesswork is inarguably as well qualified as canbe hoped under the circumstances.The most crucial semantic mechanism, which is introduced in the thesis, is the Symbiosis of SignSystems. The thesis describes, the way in which this mechanism allows a verbally and a visuallybased system of signs to join in a symbiotic relation, in which the two-stage visual semiotic systemborrows the lexicality of the three-stage verbal semiotic system and helps articulate theorganizational myth within very small means. In turn, the three-stage verbal semiotic systemborrows the ability to make any expression unique from the two-stage visual semiotic system.Hence, the fast decoding of the visual expression and the broad band with of the verbal semioticsystem are combined.It is a central point of the thesis, that the organisation is always represented in the logotype throughthe name at the same time as the logotype links the organisational myth with the organisationthrough metonymical compression.Hence the title of the thesis: Visual Names.",
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year = "2005",
language = "Dansk",
pages = "1--186",
publisher = "Institute of Language and Communication, University of Southern Denmark",
edition = "1",
type = "WorkingPaper",
institution = "Institute of Language and Communication, University of Southern Denmark",

}

Johannessen, CM & Moos, HG 2005 'At hedde et billede: En undersøgelse af betydningsdannelsen i logotyper' 1 udg, Institute of Language and Communication, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, s. 1-186.

At hedde et billede : En undersøgelse af betydningsdannelsen i logotyper. / Johannessen, Christian Mosbæk; Moos, Henrik Gedde.

1. udg. Odense : Institute of Language and Communication, University of Southern Denmark, 2005. s. 1-186.

Publikation: Working paperForskning

TY - UNPB

T1 - At hedde et billede

T2 - En undersøgelse af betydningsdannelsen i logotyper

AU - Johannessen, Christian Mosbæk

AU - Moos, Henrik Gedde

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - SummaryThis is a theory-based thesis, which investigates corporate logotypes as a means of communication.The investigation is conducted within the overall theoretic framework of Systemic FunctionalLinguistics, in the interpretation of Danish Linguists: Thomas Lund Andersen, Uwe Helm Petersenand Flemming Smedegaard (2001), in extension of MAK. Halliday (1994, 1999) and ChristianMathiessen (1999). In order to obtain the richest detail in the investigation, the semiotic and cognitive approaches onlanguage (Roland Barthes, 1996; Umberto Eco, 1976) (Mark Turner, 1991, 1998, 2000; GillesFaucounnier, 1994, 1998) as well as the sociological and symbolistic approaches on organisations(Niklas Luhmann, 1988, 1999, 2000) (Majken Schultz, Mary Jo Hatch, 2000) are taken into accountwithin the Systemic Functional frame. The investigation launches from an introductory historical account, which describes how four leaps can be observed in the development of the logotype. These developmental leaps are closely related to the simultaneous development of the surrounding society and its means of communication: Bookprinting, national mass-medias, global mass-medias and the Internet. Also, the thesis links thecommunicative development of the logotype with the recent recognition of a brand’s ability togenerate and accumulate economical value within an organisation.The creation of meaning is the focus of the thesis, which proposes a model of “Semantic Space”.The model recognizes the illusive nature of semantic processes, as well as the complex dual natureof logotype-specific semantics, which is based upon elements from both visual and verbal semioticsystems. “Semantic Space” is an abstraction, based on the mutual position of seven semanticmechanisms in the space between semantic and semiotic abstraction. The term “Black Box” is usedabout the most illusive parts of Semantic Space, which contains semantic mechanisms that cannever be subject to observation. The proposed model gives an overview and heightenedunderstanding of the mutual parts played by the semantic mechanisms in the construction ofmeaning – whether observable or not.The model is based on the idea of input into- and output from the semantic stratum. Contextualstructures are the input to the semantic process, which in turn outputs expressions. The thesisdiscusses output and input respectively in parts Two and Three, and combines its observations inpart Four, which deals with semantics.The output from Semantic Space is realised by the lexico-grammar of the logotypes. This part of thethesis rests on the overall Systemic Functional frame. Applying Systemic Functional Linguistics ona hitherto uncharted semiotic system poses certain dangers; in order to avoid creating a grammaticalmirror-image of verbal grammar in observation of logotypes, the specific meta-functions areinitially reduced to their essence, then used as the base upon which a logotype-specific grammar iscreated.Logotypes transfer the essence of experiential meaning, which is facts and experiences, logicalmeaning through interdependency, interpersonal meaning through intersubjectivity and textualmeaning through structure. The description of the four meta-functions in relation to logotypes, hasresulted in systems which embrace all articulations of the four types of meaning.Part Three of the thesis establishes the discourse of the logotype. The compatibility of the appliedtheories is tested, before they are put to use. Based on the work of German sociologist NiklasLuhmann, the necessity of means of communication such as logotypes in a hyper complex society isproposed. This part of the thesis argues that logotypes are a necessary means of reducingcomplexity, in consequence of the steadily increasing pressure of complexity, modern man faces.This fact establishes a relation between the amount of attention the logotypes receive and the everincreasing complexity in society.Based on the theory of Social Systems, this part of the thesis also establishes a new understandingof the terms “internal” and “external” in relation to organisations. Albeit the new understanding ismerely an extension of its predecessor, it reflects the dynamics characteristic to these terms. Hence,new light, which reveals the impact of this dynamic on the use and effect of logotypes, is shed onthe discourse.Traditional semiotics and symbolistic organizational theory is applied, in order to explain the waylogotypes work as an anchor point for organizational storytelling and myth. These discoveries aresupplemented with a cognitive perspective, to reveal the way corporate stories and myths alongwith logotypes each supply input spaces for a blended space, which insures long term connectionsbetween story and logotype.The efficiency of the communication and the life span of the logotype depend on fourinterconnected developments, each within its own timeframe. The concepts of Generation andsemogenesis allow us to observe the part of the process of creating meaning, which is sparked in thespace between the expression and the development of language, language-user and signrespectively. The first three time frames have been introduced by Halliday and Mathiessen. Thelast, endo-semogentic, time frame has been developed within this thesis, specifically for use withlogotypes. These semo-genetic time frames are crucial to understanding temporal implications ofthe creation of menaning.Having established a more richly detailed and faceted understanding of the input and output ofSemantic Space, Part Four of the thesis gathers the threads that have been laid out in the precedingparts, and proposes a theory of the creation of meaning in logotypes. Because of the illusiveness ofsemantics, the thesis is limited to theorizing the semantic mechanisms – but due to the basis, whichhas been established in parts Two and Three, the guesswork is inarguably as well qualified as canbe hoped under the circumstances.The most crucial semantic mechanism, which is introduced in the thesis, is the Symbiosis of SignSystems. The thesis describes, the way in which this mechanism allows a verbally and a visuallybased system of signs to join in a symbiotic relation, in which the two-stage visual semiotic systemborrows the lexicality of the three-stage verbal semiotic system and helps articulate theorganizational myth within very small means. In turn, the three-stage verbal semiotic systemborrows the ability to make any expression unique from the two-stage visual semiotic system.Hence, the fast decoding of the visual expression and the broad band with of the verbal semioticsystem are combined.It is a central point of the thesis, that the organisation is always represented in the logotype throughthe name at the same time as the logotype links the organisational myth with the organisationthrough metonymical compression.Hence the title of the thesis: Visual Names.

AB - SummaryThis is a theory-based thesis, which investigates corporate logotypes as a means of communication.The investigation is conducted within the overall theoretic framework of Systemic FunctionalLinguistics, in the interpretation of Danish Linguists: Thomas Lund Andersen, Uwe Helm Petersenand Flemming Smedegaard (2001), in extension of MAK. Halliday (1994, 1999) and ChristianMathiessen (1999). In order to obtain the richest detail in the investigation, the semiotic and cognitive approaches onlanguage (Roland Barthes, 1996; Umberto Eco, 1976) (Mark Turner, 1991, 1998, 2000; GillesFaucounnier, 1994, 1998) as well as the sociological and symbolistic approaches on organisations(Niklas Luhmann, 1988, 1999, 2000) (Majken Schultz, Mary Jo Hatch, 2000) are taken into accountwithin the Systemic Functional frame. The investigation launches from an introductory historical account, which describes how four leaps can be observed in the development of the logotype. These developmental leaps are closely related to the simultaneous development of the surrounding society and its means of communication: Bookprinting, national mass-medias, global mass-medias and the Internet. Also, the thesis links thecommunicative development of the logotype with the recent recognition of a brand’s ability togenerate and accumulate economical value within an organisation.The creation of meaning is the focus of the thesis, which proposes a model of “Semantic Space”.The model recognizes the illusive nature of semantic processes, as well as the complex dual natureof logotype-specific semantics, which is based upon elements from both visual and verbal semioticsystems. “Semantic Space” is an abstraction, based on the mutual position of seven semanticmechanisms in the space between semantic and semiotic abstraction. The term “Black Box” is usedabout the most illusive parts of Semantic Space, which contains semantic mechanisms that cannever be subject to observation. The proposed model gives an overview and heightenedunderstanding of the mutual parts played by the semantic mechanisms in the construction ofmeaning – whether observable or not.The model is based on the idea of input into- and output from the semantic stratum. Contextualstructures are the input to the semantic process, which in turn outputs expressions. The thesisdiscusses output and input respectively in parts Two and Three, and combines its observations inpart Four, which deals with semantics.The output from Semantic Space is realised by the lexico-grammar of the logotypes. This part of thethesis rests on the overall Systemic Functional frame. Applying Systemic Functional Linguistics ona hitherto uncharted semiotic system poses certain dangers; in order to avoid creating a grammaticalmirror-image of verbal grammar in observation of logotypes, the specific meta-functions areinitially reduced to their essence, then used as the base upon which a logotype-specific grammar iscreated.Logotypes transfer the essence of experiential meaning, which is facts and experiences, logicalmeaning through interdependency, interpersonal meaning through intersubjectivity and textualmeaning through structure. The description of the four meta-functions in relation to logotypes, hasresulted in systems which embrace all articulations of the four types of meaning.Part Three of the thesis establishes the discourse of the logotype. The compatibility of the appliedtheories is tested, before they are put to use. Based on the work of German sociologist NiklasLuhmann, the necessity of means of communication such as logotypes in a hyper complex society isproposed. This part of the thesis argues that logotypes are a necessary means of reducingcomplexity, in consequence of the steadily increasing pressure of complexity, modern man faces.This fact establishes a relation between the amount of attention the logotypes receive and the everincreasing complexity in society.Based on the theory of Social Systems, this part of the thesis also establishes a new understandingof the terms “internal” and “external” in relation to organisations. Albeit the new understanding ismerely an extension of its predecessor, it reflects the dynamics characteristic to these terms. Hence,new light, which reveals the impact of this dynamic on the use and effect of logotypes, is shed onthe discourse.Traditional semiotics and symbolistic organizational theory is applied, in order to explain the waylogotypes work as an anchor point for organizational storytelling and myth. These discoveries aresupplemented with a cognitive perspective, to reveal the way corporate stories and myths alongwith logotypes each supply input spaces for a blended space, which insures long term connectionsbetween story and logotype.The efficiency of the communication and the life span of the logotype depend on fourinterconnected developments, each within its own timeframe. The concepts of Generation andsemogenesis allow us to observe the part of the process of creating meaning, which is sparked in thespace between the expression and the development of language, language-user and signrespectively. The first three time frames have been introduced by Halliday and Mathiessen. Thelast, endo-semogentic, time frame has been developed within this thesis, specifically for use withlogotypes. These semo-genetic time frames are crucial to understanding temporal implications ofthe creation of menaning.Having established a more richly detailed and faceted understanding of the input and output ofSemantic Space, Part Four of the thesis gathers the threads that have been laid out in the precedingparts, and proposes a theory of the creation of meaning in logotypes. Because of the illusiveness ofsemantics, the thesis is limited to theorizing the semantic mechanisms – but due to the basis, whichhas been established in parts Two and Three, the guesswork is inarguably as well qualified as canbe hoped under the circumstances.The most crucial semantic mechanism, which is introduced in the thesis, is the Symbiosis of SignSystems. The thesis describes, the way in which this mechanism allows a verbally and a visuallybased system of signs to join in a symbiotic relation, in which the two-stage visual semiotic systemborrows the lexicality of the three-stage verbal semiotic system and helps articulate theorganizational myth within very small means. In turn, the three-stage verbal semiotic systemborrows the ability to make any expression unique from the two-stage visual semiotic system.Hence, the fast decoding of the visual expression and the broad band with of the verbal semioticsystem are combined.It is a central point of the thesis, that the organisation is always represented in the logotype throughthe name at the same time as the logotype links the organisational myth with the organisationthrough metonymical compression.Hence the title of the thesis: Visual Names.

KW - Logotype

KW - Logo

KW - Figurmærke

KW - Systemisk Funktionel Lingvistik

KW - Logotype

KW - Logo

KW - Device Mark

KW - Systemic Functional Grammar

KW - Mental Space

KW - Conceptual Integration Networks

M3 - Working paper

SP - 1

EP - 186

BT - At hedde et billede

PB - Institute of Language and Communication, University of Southern Denmark

CY - Odense

ER -

Johannessen CM, Moos HG. At hedde et billede: En undersøgelse af betydningsdannelsen i logotyper. 1 udg. Odense: Institute of Language and Communication, University of Southern Denmark. 2005, s. 1-186.