Association of Psoriasis With the Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity

Ann Sophie Lønnberg, Lone Skov, Axel Skytthe, Kirsten Ohm Kyvik, Ole Birger Pedersen, Simon Francis Thomsen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Importance: Psoriasis has been shown to be associated with overweight and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The genetic association is unclear. Objective: To examine the association among psoriasis, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and body mass index (BMI) (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) in twins. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cross-sectional, population-based twin study included 34 781 Danish twins, 20 to 71 years of age. Data from a questionnaire on psoriasis was validated against hospital discharge diagnoses of psoriasis and compared with hospital discharge diagnoses of type 2 diabetes mellitus and self-reported BMI. Data were collected in the spring of 2002. Data were analyzed from January 1 to October 31, 2014. Main Outcomes and Measures: Crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for psoriasis in relation to type 2 diabetes mellitus, increasing BMI, and obesity in the whole population of twins and in 449 psoriasis-discordant twins. Variance component analysis was used to measure genetic and nongenetic effects on the associations. Results: Among the 34 781 questionnaire respondents, 33 588 with complete data were included in the study (15 443 men [46.0%]; 18 145 women [54.0%]; mean [SD] age, 44.5 [7.6] years). After multivariable adjustment, a significant association was found between psoriasis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR], 1.53; 95% CI, 1.03-2.27; P = .04) and between psoriasis and increasing BMI (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.28-2.55; P = .001 in individuals with a BMI>35.0). Among psoriasis-discordant twin pairs, the association between psoriasis and obesity was diluted in monozygotic twins (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 0.50-4.07; P = .50) relative to dizygotic twins (OR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.03-4.39; P = .04). Variance decomposition showed that additive genetic factors accounted for 68% (95% CI, 60%-75%) of the variance in the susceptibility to psoriasis, for 73% (95% CI, 58%-83%) of the variance in susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus, and for 74% (95% CI, 72%-76%) of the variance in BMI. The genetic correlation between psoriasis and type 2 diabetes mellitus was 0.13 (-0.06 to 0.31; P = .17); between psoriasis and BMI, 0.12 (0.08 to 0.19; P < .001). The environmental correlation between psoriasis and type 2 diabetes mellitus was 0.10 (-0.71 to 0.17; P = .63); between psoriasis and BMI, -0.05 (-0.14 to 0.04; P = .44). Conclusions and Relevance: This study determines the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to the interaction between obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and psoriasis. Psoriasis, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and obesity are also strongly associated in adults after taking key confounding factors, such as sex, age, and smoking, into account. Results indicate a common genetic etiology for psoriasis and obesity.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJ A M A Dermatology
Vol/bind152
Udgave nummer7
Sider (fra-til)761-767
ISSN2168-6068
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jul. 2016

Fingeraftryk

Psoriasis
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Body Mass Index
Odds Ratio
Dizygotic Twins
Twin Studies
Monozygotic Twins
Population

Citer dette

Lønnberg, Ann Sophie ; Skov, Lone ; Skytthe, Axel ; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm ; Pedersen, Ole Birger ; Thomsen, Simon Francis. / Association of Psoriasis With the Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity. I: J A M A Dermatology. 2016 ; Bind 152, Nr. 7. s. 761-767.
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title = "Association of Psoriasis With the Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity",
abstract = "Importance: Psoriasis has been shown to be associated with overweight and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The genetic association is unclear.Objective: To examine the association among psoriasis, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and body mass index (BMI) (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) in twins.Design, Setting, and Participants: This cross-sectional, population-based twin study included 34 781 Danish twins, 20 to 71 years of age. Data from a questionnaire on psoriasis was validated against hospital discharge diagnoses of psoriasis and compared with hospital discharge diagnoses of type 2 diabetes mellitus and self-reported BMI. Data were collected in the spring of 2002. Data were analyzed from January 1 to October 31, 2014.Main Outcomes and Measures: Crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for psoriasis in relation to type 2 diabetes mellitus, increasing BMI, and obesity in the whole population of twins and in 449 psoriasis-discordant twins. Variance component analysis was used to measure genetic and nongenetic effects on the associations.Results: Among the 34 781 questionnaire respondents, 33 588 with complete data were included in the study (15 443 men [46.0{\%}]; 18 145 women [54.0{\%}]; mean [SD] age, 44.5 [7.6] years). After multivariable adjustment, a significant association was found between psoriasis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR], 1.53; 95{\%} CI, 1.03-2.27; P = .04) and between psoriasis and increasing BMI (OR, 1.81; 95{\%} CI, 1.28-2.55; P = .001 in individuals with a BMI>35.0). Among psoriasis-discordant twin pairs, the association between psoriasis and obesity was diluted in monozygotic twins (OR, 1.43; 95{\%} CI, 0.50-4.07; P = .50) relative to dizygotic twins (OR, 2.13; 95{\%} CI, 1.03-4.39; P = .04). Variance decomposition showed that additive genetic factors accounted for 68{\%} (95{\%} CI, 60{\%}-75{\%}) of the variance in the susceptibility to psoriasis, for 73{\%} (95{\%} CI, 58{\%}-83{\%}) of the variance in susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus, and for 74{\%} (95{\%} CI, 72{\%}-76{\%}) of the variance in BMI. The genetic correlation between psoriasis and type 2 diabetes mellitus was 0.13 (-0.06 to 0.31; P = .17); between psoriasis and BMI, 0.12 (0.08 to 0.19; P < .001). The environmental correlation between psoriasis and type 2 diabetes mellitus was 0.10 (-0.71 to 0.17; P = .63); between psoriasis and BMI, -0.05 (-0.14 to 0.04; P = .44).Conclusions and Relevance: This study determines the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to the interaction between obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and psoriasis. Psoriasis, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and obesity are also strongly associated in adults after taking key confounding factors, such as sex, age, and smoking, into account. Results indicate a common genetic etiology for psoriasis and obesity.",
author = "L{\o}nnberg, {Ann Sophie} and Lone Skov and Axel Skytthe and Kyvik, {Kirsten Ohm} and Pedersen, {Ole Birger} and Thomsen, {Simon Francis}",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1001/jamadermatol.2015.6262",
language = "English",
volume = "152",
pages = "761--767",
journal = "Archives of Dermatology",
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Association of Psoriasis With the Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity. / Lønnberg, Ann Sophie; Skov, Lone; Skytthe, Axel; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Pedersen, Ole Birger; Thomsen, Simon Francis.

I: J A M A Dermatology, Bind 152, Nr. 7, 07.2016, s. 761-767.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of Psoriasis With the Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity

AU - Lønnberg, Ann Sophie

AU - Skov, Lone

AU - Skytthe, Axel

AU - Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

AU - Pedersen, Ole Birger

AU - Thomsen, Simon Francis

PY - 2016/7

Y1 - 2016/7

N2 - Importance: Psoriasis has been shown to be associated with overweight and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The genetic association is unclear.Objective: To examine the association among psoriasis, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and body mass index (BMI) (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) in twins.Design, Setting, and Participants: This cross-sectional, population-based twin study included 34 781 Danish twins, 20 to 71 years of age. Data from a questionnaire on psoriasis was validated against hospital discharge diagnoses of psoriasis and compared with hospital discharge diagnoses of type 2 diabetes mellitus and self-reported BMI. Data were collected in the spring of 2002. Data were analyzed from January 1 to October 31, 2014.Main Outcomes and Measures: Crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for psoriasis in relation to type 2 diabetes mellitus, increasing BMI, and obesity in the whole population of twins and in 449 psoriasis-discordant twins. Variance component analysis was used to measure genetic and nongenetic effects on the associations.Results: Among the 34 781 questionnaire respondents, 33 588 with complete data were included in the study (15 443 men [46.0%]; 18 145 women [54.0%]; mean [SD] age, 44.5 [7.6] years). After multivariable adjustment, a significant association was found between psoriasis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR], 1.53; 95% CI, 1.03-2.27; P = .04) and between psoriasis and increasing BMI (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.28-2.55; P = .001 in individuals with a BMI>35.0). Among psoriasis-discordant twin pairs, the association between psoriasis and obesity was diluted in monozygotic twins (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 0.50-4.07; P = .50) relative to dizygotic twins (OR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.03-4.39; P = .04). Variance decomposition showed that additive genetic factors accounted for 68% (95% CI, 60%-75%) of the variance in the susceptibility to psoriasis, for 73% (95% CI, 58%-83%) of the variance in susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus, and for 74% (95% CI, 72%-76%) of the variance in BMI. The genetic correlation between psoriasis and type 2 diabetes mellitus was 0.13 (-0.06 to 0.31; P = .17); between psoriasis and BMI, 0.12 (0.08 to 0.19; P < .001). The environmental correlation between psoriasis and type 2 diabetes mellitus was 0.10 (-0.71 to 0.17; P = .63); between psoriasis and BMI, -0.05 (-0.14 to 0.04; P = .44).Conclusions and Relevance: This study determines the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to the interaction between obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and psoriasis. Psoriasis, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and obesity are also strongly associated in adults after taking key confounding factors, such as sex, age, and smoking, into account. Results indicate a common genetic etiology for psoriasis and obesity.

AB - Importance: Psoriasis has been shown to be associated with overweight and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The genetic association is unclear.Objective: To examine the association among psoriasis, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and body mass index (BMI) (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) in twins.Design, Setting, and Participants: This cross-sectional, population-based twin study included 34 781 Danish twins, 20 to 71 years of age. Data from a questionnaire on psoriasis was validated against hospital discharge diagnoses of psoriasis and compared with hospital discharge diagnoses of type 2 diabetes mellitus and self-reported BMI. Data were collected in the spring of 2002. Data were analyzed from January 1 to October 31, 2014.Main Outcomes and Measures: Crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for psoriasis in relation to type 2 diabetes mellitus, increasing BMI, and obesity in the whole population of twins and in 449 psoriasis-discordant twins. Variance component analysis was used to measure genetic and nongenetic effects on the associations.Results: Among the 34 781 questionnaire respondents, 33 588 with complete data were included in the study (15 443 men [46.0%]; 18 145 women [54.0%]; mean [SD] age, 44.5 [7.6] years). After multivariable adjustment, a significant association was found between psoriasis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR], 1.53; 95% CI, 1.03-2.27; P = .04) and between psoriasis and increasing BMI (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.28-2.55; P = .001 in individuals with a BMI>35.0). Among psoriasis-discordant twin pairs, the association between psoriasis and obesity was diluted in monozygotic twins (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 0.50-4.07; P = .50) relative to dizygotic twins (OR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.03-4.39; P = .04). Variance decomposition showed that additive genetic factors accounted for 68% (95% CI, 60%-75%) of the variance in the susceptibility to psoriasis, for 73% (95% CI, 58%-83%) of the variance in susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus, and for 74% (95% CI, 72%-76%) of the variance in BMI. The genetic correlation between psoriasis and type 2 diabetes mellitus was 0.13 (-0.06 to 0.31; P = .17); between psoriasis and BMI, 0.12 (0.08 to 0.19; P < .001). The environmental correlation between psoriasis and type 2 diabetes mellitus was 0.10 (-0.71 to 0.17; P = .63); between psoriasis and BMI, -0.05 (-0.14 to 0.04; P = .44).Conclusions and Relevance: This study determines the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to the interaction between obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and psoriasis. Psoriasis, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and obesity are also strongly associated in adults after taking key confounding factors, such as sex, age, and smoking, into account. Results indicate a common genetic etiology for psoriasis and obesity.

U2 - 10.1001/jamadermatol.2015.6262

DO - 10.1001/jamadermatol.2015.6262

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27120802

VL - 152

SP - 761

EP - 767

JO - Archives of Dermatology

JF - Archives of Dermatology

SN - 0003-987X

IS - 7

ER -