Association of pain and risk of falls in community-dwelling adults: a prospective study in the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE)

Giulia Ogliari, Jesper Ryg, Karen Andersen-Ranberg, Lasse Lybecker Scheel-Hincke, Jemima T. Collins, Alison Cowley, Claudio Di Lorito, Louise Howe, Katie R. Robinson, Vicky Booth, David A. Walsh, John R.F. Gladman, Rowan H. Harwood*, Tahir Masud

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Abstrakt

Purpose: To investigate the longitudinal associations between pain and falls risks in adults. Methods: Prospective cohort study on data from 40,636 community-dwelling adults ≥ 50 years assessed in Wave 5 and 6 in the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). Socio-demographic and clinical information was collected at baseline (Wave 5). At 2-year follow-up (Wave 6), falls in the previous 6 months were recorded. The longitudinal associations between pain intensity, number of pain sites and pain in specific anatomic sites, respectively, and falls risk were analysed by binary logistic regression models; odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) were calculated. All analyses were adjusted for socio-demographic and clinical factors and stratified by sex. Results: Mean age was 65.8 years (standard deviation 9.3; range 50–103); 22,486 (55.3%) participants were women. At follow-up, 2805 (6.9%) participants reported fall(s) in the previous 6 months. After adjustment, participants with moderate and severe pain at baseline had an increased falls risk at follow-up of 1.35 (1.21–1.51) and 1.52 (1.31–1.75), respectively, compared to those without pain (both p < 0.001); mild pain was not associated with falls risk. Associations between pain intensity and falls risk were greater at younger age (p for interaction < 0.001). Among participants with pain, pain in ≥ 2 sites or all over (multisite pain) was associated with an increased falls risk of 1.29 (1.14–1.45) compared to pain in one site (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Moderate, severe and multisite pain were associated with an increased risk of subsequent falls in adults.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Geriatric Medicine
Vol/bind13
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)1441-1454
ISSN1878-7649
DOI
StatusUdgivet - dec. 2022

Bibliografisk note

Funding Information:
This study presents independent research supported by the United Kingdom National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre (BRC). The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care. This paper uses data from SHARE Wave 5 and 6, release version: 8.0.0., as of 10th February 2022 ( https://doi.org/10.6103/SHARE.w5.800 and https://doi.org/10.6103/SHARE.w6.800 ), see Börsch-Supan et al. (2013) for methodological details [Borsch-Supan A, Brandt M, Hunkler C, et al. SHARE Central Coordination Team. Data Resource Profile: the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). Int J Epidemiol 2013;42:992–1001]. The SHARE data collection has been primarily funded by the European Commission through the fifth framework programme (project QLK6-CT-2001–00 360 in the thematic programme Quality of Life), through the sixth framework programme (projects SHARE-I3, RII-CT-2006–0 62 193; COMPARE, CIT5-CT-2005–0 28 857; and SHARELIFE, CIT4-CT-2006–0 28 812) and through the seventh framework programme (SHARE-PREP, 2 11 909 and SHARE-LEAP, 227822). Additional funding from the US National Institute on Ageing (U01 AG09740-13S2, P01 AG005842, P01 AG08291, P30 AG12815, Y1-AG-4553–01 and OGHA 04–064, IAG BSR06-11, R21 AG025169) as well as from various national sources is gratefully acknowledged (see http://www.share-project.org/contact-organisation/funding.html for a full list of funding institutions).

Funding Information:
This study presents independent research supported by the United Kingdom National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre (BRC). The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care.

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