Association between smoking and the risk of heavy drinking among young women: a prospective study.

Camilla Schmidt Morgen, Kira Bang Bové, Katrine Strandberg Larsen, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Morten Grønbaek

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: null-null
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAlcohol & Alcoholism
Vol/bind43
Udgave nummer3
Sider (fra-til)371-5
Antal sider4
ISSN0735-0414
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2008

Fingeraftryk

Drinking
Smoking
Prospective Studies
Confidence Intervals
Alcohols
Habits
Tobacco Products
Logistics
Odds Ratio
Alcohol Drinking
Logistic Models

Citer dette

Morgen, Camilla Schmidt ; Bové, Kira Bang ; Larsen, Katrine Strandberg ; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger ; Grønbaek, Morten. / Association between smoking and the risk of heavy drinking among young women: a prospective study. I: Alcohol & Alcoholism. 2008 ; Bind 43, Nr. 3. s. 371-5.
@article{be006ca0480811dd9fbe000ea68e967b,
title = "Association between smoking and the risk of heavy drinking among young women: a prospective study.",
abstract = "AIM: To address the association between smoking habits and the risk of later heavy drinking among young women. METHODS: Repeated assessments of alcohol and smoking habits were obtained in 1991-93 and 1999-2000 in a Danish representative cohort in Copenhagen. A total of 6369 non- to moderate-drinking Danish women, aged 20-29 years at baseline, attended a follow-up examination and were included in the study. The risk of becoming a heavy drinker (more than 14 drinks per week) 8 years after enrolment was analyzed by means of logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 177 women became heavy drinkers during follow-up. Daily smoking at baseline was associated with an increased risk of becoming a heavy drinker 8 years later. Relative to nonsmokers, the adjusted odds ratios (OR) for becoming a heavy drinker associated with smoking 1-14, 15-24, or more than 24 cigarettes per day were 1.6 (95{\%} confidence intervals (CI) 1.1-2.4), 1.7 (CI 1.1-2.6), and 2.3 (CI 0.9-5.9), respectively. Age at sexual debut modified the effect of smoking, and women with a debut before the age of 15 years had an adjusted OR of 2.9 (CI 1.1-3.9) compared to never-smokers while there seemed to be no effect among women with a sexual debut after the age of 18. In addition, relative to nondrinkers, all of the moderate (1-5 units per week), medium (6-10 units), and large (10-14 units) alcohol consumption at baseline were associated independently with becoming a heavy drinker 8 years later. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that smoking is an important predictor of later heavy drinking among young women and that this relatively elevated risk is most pronounced among women with an early sexual debut.",
author = "Morgen, {Camilla Schmidt} and Bov{\'e}, {Kira Bang} and Larsen, {Katrine Strandberg} and Kjaer, {Susanne Kr{\"u}ger} and Morten Gr{\o}nbaek",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1093/alcalc/agn001",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
pages = "371--5",
journal = "Alcohol and Alcoholism",
issn = "0735-0414",
publisher = "Heinemann",
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Association between smoking and the risk of heavy drinking among young women: a prospective study. / Morgen, Camilla Schmidt; Bové, Kira Bang; Larsen, Katrine Strandberg; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Grønbaek, Morten.

I: Alcohol & Alcoholism, Bind 43, Nr. 3, 2008, s. 371-5.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between smoking and the risk of heavy drinking among young women: a prospective study.

AU - Morgen, Camilla Schmidt

AU - Bové, Kira Bang

AU - Larsen, Katrine Strandberg

AU - Kjaer, Susanne Krüger

AU - Grønbaek, Morten

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - AIM: To address the association between smoking habits and the risk of later heavy drinking among young women. METHODS: Repeated assessments of alcohol and smoking habits were obtained in 1991-93 and 1999-2000 in a Danish representative cohort in Copenhagen. A total of 6369 non- to moderate-drinking Danish women, aged 20-29 years at baseline, attended a follow-up examination and were included in the study. The risk of becoming a heavy drinker (more than 14 drinks per week) 8 years after enrolment was analyzed by means of logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 177 women became heavy drinkers during follow-up. Daily smoking at baseline was associated with an increased risk of becoming a heavy drinker 8 years later. Relative to nonsmokers, the adjusted odds ratios (OR) for becoming a heavy drinker associated with smoking 1-14, 15-24, or more than 24 cigarettes per day were 1.6 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.1-2.4), 1.7 (CI 1.1-2.6), and 2.3 (CI 0.9-5.9), respectively. Age at sexual debut modified the effect of smoking, and women with a debut before the age of 15 years had an adjusted OR of 2.9 (CI 1.1-3.9) compared to never-smokers while there seemed to be no effect among women with a sexual debut after the age of 18. In addition, relative to nondrinkers, all of the moderate (1-5 units per week), medium (6-10 units), and large (10-14 units) alcohol consumption at baseline were associated independently with becoming a heavy drinker 8 years later. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that smoking is an important predictor of later heavy drinking among young women and that this relatively elevated risk is most pronounced among women with an early sexual debut.

AB - AIM: To address the association between smoking habits and the risk of later heavy drinking among young women. METHODS: Repeated assessments of alcohol and smoking habits were obtained in 1991-93 and 1999-2000 in a Danish representative cohort in Copenhagen. A total of 6369 non- to moderate-drinking Danish women, aged 20-29 years at baseline, attended a follow-up examination and were included in the study. The risk of becoming a heavy drinker (more than 14 drinks per week) 8 years after enrolment was analyzed by means of logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 177 women became heavy drinkers during follow-up. Daily smoking at baseline was associated with an increased risk of becoming a heavy drinker 8 years later. Relative to nonsmokers, the adjusted odds ratios (OR) for becoming a heavy drinker associated with smoking 1-14, 15-24, or more than 24 cigarettes per day were 1.6 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.1-2.4), 1.7 (CI 1.1-2.6), and 2.3 (CI 0.9-5.9), respectively. Age at sexual debut modified the effect of smoking, and women with a debut before the age of 15 years had an adjusted OR of 2.9 (CI 1.1-3.9) compared to never-smokers while there seemed to be no effect among women with a sexual debut after the age of 18. In addition, relative to nondrinkers, all of the moderate (1-5 units per week), medium (6-10 units), and large (10-14 units) alcohol consumption at baseline were associated independently with becoming a heavy drinker 8 years later. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that smoking is an important predictor of later heavy drinking among young women and that this relatively elevated risk is most pronounced among women with an early sexual debut.

U2 - 10.1093/alcalc/agn001

DO - 10.1093/alcalc/agn001

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 18223292

VL - 43

SP - 371

EP - 375

JO - Alcohol and Alcoholism

JF - Alcohol and Alcoholism

SN - 0735-0414

IS - 3

ER -