Are there gender differences in coping with neck pain following acute whiplash trauma? A 12-month follow-up study

Tina B W Carstensen, Lisbeth Frostholm, Eva Oernboel, Alice Kongsted, Helge Kasch, Troels Schmidt Jensen, Per Fink

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: Little is known about gender differences in coping after whiplash, and to date possible interaction of gender and coping on recovery has not been investigated. AIMS: To examine if gender differences in coping are associated with long-lasting neck pain after acute whiplash. METHODS: Seven hundred and forty participants referred from emergency departments or general practitioners after car accidents in Denmark. Within a median of five days, post-collision participants completed questionnaires on collision characteristics, psychological distress, and socio-demographics. After 3months they completed the Coping Strategies Questionnaire, and after 12months a VAS scale on neck pain intensity. RESULTS: The odds for long-lasting neck pain were more than twice as high for women than for men (OR=2.17 (95% CI: 1.40; 3.37). However, no gender difference in coping and no interaction between gender and the five coping subscales on neck pain after 12months were found. 'Distraction' increased the odds for considerable neck pain for both men and women (OR=1.03 (95% CI: 1.01; 1.05), 'reinterpreting' (OR=1.03 (95% CI: 1.01; 1.06), 'catastrophizing' (OR=1.14 (95% CI: 1.10; 1.18), and 'praying and hoping' (OR=1.10 (95% CI: 1.05; 1.13) for each point on these scales. CONCLUSIONS: No interaction between coping and gender on neck pain was found, thus different coping strategies 3months post-collision did not explain the different prognosis observed in men and women. Clinically relevant influence of 'catastrophizing' and 'praying and hoping' to prognosis was found, therefore we should identify patients predominantly using these strategies.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Journal of Pain
Vol/bind16
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)49-60
ISSN1090-3801
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2012

Fingeraftryk

Neck Pain
Wounds and Injuries
Denmark
General Practitioners
Accidents
Hospital Emergency Service

Citer dette

Carstensen, Tina B W ; Frostholm, Lisbeth ; Oernboel, Eva ; Kongsted, Alice ; Kasch, Helge ; Jensen, Troels Schmidt ; Fink, Per. / Are there gender differences in coping with neck pain following acute whiplash trauma? A 12-month follow-up study. I: European Journal of Pain. 2012 ; Bind 16, Nr. 1. s. 49-60.
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title = "Are there gender differences in coping with neck pain following acute whiplash trauma? A 12-month follow-up study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Little is known about gender differences in coping after whiplash, and to date possible interaction of gender and coping on recovery has not been investigated. AIMS: To examine if gender differences in coping are associated with long-lasting neck pain after acute whiplash. METHODS: Seven hundred and forty participants referred from emergency departments or general practitioners after car accidents in Denmark. Within a median of five days, post-collision participants completed questionnaires on collision characteristics, psychological distress, and socio-demographics. After 3months they completed the Coping Strategies Questionnaire, and after 12months a VAS scale on neck pain intensity. RESULTS: The odds for long-lasting neck pain were more than twice as high for women than for men (OR=2.17 (95{\%} CI: 1.40; 3.37). However, no gender difference in coping and no interaction between gender and the five coping subscales on neck pain after 12months were found. 'Distraction' increased the odds for considerable neck pain for both men and women (OR=1.03 (95{\%} CI: 1.01; 1.05), 'reinterpreting' (OR=1.03 (95{\%} CI: 1.01; 1.06), 'catastrophizing' (OR=1.14 (95{\%} CI: 1.10; 1.18), and 'praying and hoping' (OR=1.10 (95{\%} CI: 1.05; 1.13) for each point on these scales. CONCLUSIONS: No interaction between coping and gender on neck pain was found, thus different coping strategies 3months post-collision did not explain the different prognosis observed in men and women. Clinically relevant influence of 'catastrophizing' and 'praying and hoping' to prognosis was found, therefore we should identify patients predominantly using these strategies.",
author = "Carstensen, {Tina B W} and Lisbeth Frostholm and Eva Oernboel and Alice Kongsted and Helge Kasch and Jensen, {Troels Schmidt} and Per Fink",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1016/j.ejpain.2011.06.002",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "49--60",
journal = "European Journal of Pain",
issn = "1090-3801",
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Are there gender differences in coping with neck pain following acute whiplash trauma? A 12-month follow-up study. / Carstensen, Tina B W; Frostholm, Lisbeth; Oernboel, Eva; Kongsted, Alice; Kasch, Helge; Jensen, Troels Schmidt; Fink, Per.

I: European Journal of Pain, Bind 16, Nr. 1, 2012, s. 49-60.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are there gender differences in coping with neck pain following acute whiplash trauma? A 12-month follow-up study

AU - Carstensen, Tina B W

AU - Frostholm, Lisbeth

AU - Oernboel, Eva

AU - Kongsted, Alice

AU - Kasch, Helge

AU - Jensen, Troels Schmidt

AU - Fink, Per

N1 - Copyright © 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - BACKGROUND: Little is known about gender differences in coping after whiplash, and to date possible interaction of gender and coping on recovery has not been investigated. AIMS: To examine if gender differences in coping are associated with long-lasting neck pain after acute whiplash. METHODS: Seven hundred and forty participants referred from emergency departments or general practitioners after car accidents in Denmark. Within a median of five days, post-collision participants completed questionnaires on collision characteristics, psychological distress, and socio-demographics. After 3months they completed the Coping Strategies Questionnaire, and after 12months a VAS scale on neck pain intensity. RESULTS: The odds for long-lasting neck pain were more than twice as high for women than for men (OR=2.17 (95% CI: 1.40; 3.37). However, no gender difference in coping and no interaction between gender and the five coping subscales on neck pain after 12months were found. 'Distraction' increased the odds for considerable neck pain for both men and women (OR=1.03 (95% CI: 1.01; 1.05), 'reinterpreting' (OR=1.03 (95% CI: 1.01; 1.06), 'catastrophizing' (OR=1.14 (95% CI: 1.10; 1.18), and 'praying and hoping' (OR=1.10 (95% CI: 1.05; 1.13) for each point on these scales. CONCLUSIONS: No interaction between coping and gender on neck pain was found, thus different coping strategies 3months post-collision did not explain the different prognosis observed in men and women. Clinically relevant influence of 'catastrophizing' and 'praying and hoping' to prognosis was found, therefore we should identify patients predominantly using these strategies.

AB - BACKGROUND: Little is known about gender differences in coping after whiplash, and to date possible interaction of gender and coping on recovery has not been investigated. AIMS: To examine if gender differences in coping are associated with long-lasting neck pain after acute whiplash. METHODS: Seven hundred and forty participants referred from emergency departments or general practitioners after car accidents in Denmark. Within a median of five days, post-collision participants completed questionnaires on collision characteristics, psychological distress, and socio-demographics. After 3months they completed the Coping Strategies Questionnaire, and after 12months a VAS scale on neck pain intensity. RESULTS: The odds for long-lasting neck pain were more than twice as high for women than for men (OR=2.17 (95% CI: 1.40; 3.37). However, no gender difference in coping and no interaction between gender and the five coping subscales on neck pain after 12months were found. 'Distraction' increased the odds for considerable neck pain for both men and women (OR=1.03 (95% CI: 1.01; 1.05), 'reinterpreting' (OR=1.03 (95% CI: 1.01; 1.06), 'catastrophizing' (OR=1.14 (95% CI: 1.10; 1.18), and 'praying and hoping' (OR=1.10 (95% CI: 1.05; 1.13) for each point on these scales. CONCLUSIONS: No interaction between coping and gender on neck pain was found, thus different coping strategies 3months post-collision did not explain the different prognosis observed in men and women. Clinically relevant influence of 'catastrophizing' and 'praying and hoping' to prognosis was found, therefore we should identify patients predominantly using these strategies.

U2 - 10.1016/j.ejpain.2011.06.002

DO - 10.1016/j.ejpain.2011.06.002

M3 - Journal article

VL - 16

SP - 49

EP - 60

JO - European Journal of Pain

JF - European Journal of Pain

SN - 1090-3801

IS - 1

ER -