Are insomnia type sleep problems associated with a less physically active lifestyle? A cross-sectional study among 7,700 adults from the general working population

Rúni Bláfoss, Emil Sundstrup, Markus Due Jakobsen, Hans Bay, Anne Helene Garde, Lars Louis Andersen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Background: Sleep problems are common in the general population and negatively affect both private and work life. A vicious circle may exist between poor sleep and an unhealthy lifestyle. For example, poor sleep may drain the energy to do health-promoting physical activity during leisure-time after work. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between sleep problems and the duration of low- and high-intensity leisure-time physical activity in sedentary and physical workers. Methods: This cross-sectional study employ data from the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study in 2010, where currently employed wage-earners in Denmark on daytime schedule (N = 7,706) replied to questions about sleep quality (cf. the Bergen Insomnia Scale) and participation in low- and high-intensity leisure-time physical activity. Associations were modeled using general linear models controlling for various confounders. Results: Workers with high levels of sleep problems reported less high-intensity leisure-time physical activity. Specifically, the weekly duration of high-intensity leisure-time physical activity was 139 (95%CI 111-168), 129 (95%CI 101-158), and 122 (95%CI 92-151) min in sedentary workers with sleep problems < 1, 1-3, and ≥3 days per week, respectively. The same pattern was observed among physical workers. In sedentary workers ≥50 years, the fully adjusted model showed a weekly duration in high-intensity physical activity during leisure of 122 (95%CI 83-161), 102 (95%CI 64-141), and 90 (95%CI 51-130) among those with sleep problems < 1, 1-3, and ≥3 days per week, respectively. Conclusions: Workers, particularly sedentary older workers, having sleep problems report less high-intensity leisure-time physical activity. These data suggest that a vicious circle may indeed exist between poor sleep and reduced leisure-time physical activity.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer117
TidsskriftFrontiers in Public Health
Vol/bind7
ISSN2296-2565
DOI
StatusUdgivet - maj 2019
Udgivet eksterntJa

Fingeraftryk

Leisure Activities
Cross-Sectional Studies
Population
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Denmark
Linear Models
Cohort Studies
Health

Citer dette

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title = "Are insomnia type sleep problems associated with a less physically active lifestyle? A cross-sectional study among 7,700 adults from the general working population",
abstract = "Background: Sleep problems are common in the general population and negatively affect both private and work life. A vicious circle may exist between poor sleep and an unhealthy lifestyle. For example, poor sleep may drain the energy to do health-promoting physical activity during leisure-time after work. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between sleep problems and the duration of low- and high-intensity leisure-time physical activity in sedentary and physical workers. Methods: This cross-sectional study employ data from the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study in 2010, where currently employed wage-earners in Denmark on daytime schedule (N = 7,706) replied to questions about sleep quality (cf. the Bergen Insomnia Scale) and participation in low- and high-intensity leisure-time physical activity. Associations were modeled using general linear models controlling for various confounders. Results: Workers with high levels of sleep problems reported less high-intensity leisure-time physical activity. Specifically, the weekly duration of high-intensity leisure-time physical activity was 139 (95{\%}CI 111-168), 129 (95{\%}CI 101-158), and 122 (95{\%}CI 92-151) min in sedentary workers with sleep problems < 1, 1-3, and ≥3 days per week, respectively. The same pattern was observed among physical workers. In sedentary workers ≥50 years, the fully adjusted model showed a weekly duration in high-intensity physical activity during leisure of 122 (95{\%}CI 83-161), 102 (95{\%}CI 64-141), and 90 (95{\%}CI 51-130) among those with sleep problems < 1, 1-3, and ≥3 days per week, respectively. Conclusions: Workers, particularly sedentary older workers, having sleep problems report less high-intensity leisure-time physical activity. These data suggest that a vicious circle may indeed exist between poor sleep and reduced leisure-time physical activity.",
author = "R{\'u}ni Bl{\'a}foss and Emil Sundstrup and Jakobsen, {Markus Due} and Hans Bay and Garde, {Anne Helene} and Andersen, {Lars Louis}",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
doi = "10.3389/fpubh.2019.00117",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
journal = "Frontiers in Public Health",
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Are insomnia type sleep problems associated with a less physically active lifestyle? A cross-sectional study among 7,700 adults from the general working population. / Bláfoss, Rúni; Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Bay, Hans; Garde, Anne Helene; Andersen, Lars Louis.

I: Frontiers in Public Health, Bind 7, 117, 05.2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are insomnia type sleep problems associated with a less physically active lifestyle? A cross-sectional study among 7,700 adults from the general working population

AU - Bláfoss, Rúni

AU - Sundstrup, Emil

AU - Jakobsen, Markus Due

AU - Bay, Hans

AU - Garde, Anne Helene

AU - Andersen, Lars Louis

PY - 2019/5

Y1 - 2019/5

N2 - Background: Sleep problems are common in the general population and negatively affect both private and work life. A vicious circle may exist between poor sleep and an unhealthy lifestyle. For example, poor sleep may drain the energy to do health-promoting physical activity during leisure-time after work. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between sleep problems and the duration of low- and high-intensity leisure-time physical activity in sedentary and physical workers. Methods: This cross-sectional study employ data from the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study in 2010, where currently employed wage-earners in Denmark on daytime schedule (N = 7,706) replied to questions about sleep quality (cf. the Bergen Insomnia Scale) and participation in low- and high-intensity leisure-time physical activity. Associations were modeled using general linear models controlling for various confounders. Results: Workers with high levels of sleep problems reported less high-intensity leisure-time physical activity. Specifically, the weekly duration of high-intensity leisure-time physical activity was 139 (95%CI 111-168), 129 (95%CI 101-158), and 122 (95%CI 92-151) min in sedentary workers with sleep problems < 1, 1-3, and ≥3 days per week, respectively. The same pattern was observed among physical workers. In sedentary workers ≥50 years, the fully adjusted model showed a weekly duration in high-intensity physical activity during leisure of 122 (95%CI 83-161), 102 (95%CI 64-141), and 90 (95%CI 51-130) among those with sleep problems < 1, 1-3, and ≥3 days per week, respectively. Conclusions: Workers, particularly sedentary older workers, having sleep problems report less high-intensity leisure-time physical activity. These data suggest that a vicious circle may indeed exist between poor sleep and reduced leisure-time physical activity.

AB - Background: Sleep problems are common in the general population and negatively affect both private and work life. A vicious circle may exist between poor sleep and an unhealthy lifestyle. For example, poor sleep may drain the energy to do health-promoting physical activity during leisure-time after work. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between sleep problems and the duration of low- and high-intensity leisure-time physical activity in sedentary and physical workers. Methods: This cross-sectional study employ data from the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study in 2010, where currently employed wage-earners in Denmark on daytime schedule (N = 7,706) replied to questions about sleep quality (cf. the Bergen Insomnia Scale) and participation in low- and high-intensity leisure-time physical activity. Associations were modeled using general linear models controlling for various confounders. Results: Workers with high levels of sleep problems reported less high-intensity leisure-time physical activity. Specifically, the weekly duration of high-intensity leisure-time physical activity was 139 (95%CI 111-168), 129 (95%CI 101-158), and 122 (95%CI 92-151) min in sedentary workers with sleep problems < 1, 1-3, and ≥3 days per week, respectively. The same pattern was observed among physical workers. In sedentary workers ≥50 years, the fully adjusted model showed a weekly duration in high-intensity physical activity during leisure of 122 (95%CI 83-161), 102 (95%CI 64-141), and 90 (95%CI 51-130) among those with sleep problems < 1, 1-3, and ≥3 days per week, respectively. Conclusions: Workers, particularly sedentary older workers, having sleep problems report less high-intensity leisure-time physical activity. These data suggest that a vicious circle may indeed exist between poor sleep and reduced leisure-time physical activity.

U2 - 10.3389/fpubh.2019.00117

DO - 10.3389/fpubh.2019.00117

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31139609

VL - 7

JO - Frontiers in Public Health

JF - Frontiers in Public Health

SN - 2296-2565

M1 - 117

ER -