Analysis of High-Intensity Skating in Top-Class Ice Hockey Match-Play in Relation to Training Status and Muscle Damage

Erik Lignell, Dan Fransson, Peter Krustrup, Magni Mohr

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

We examined high-intensity activities in a top-class ice-hockey game and the effect of training status. Male ice-hockey players (n = 36) from the National Hockey League participated. Match analysis was performed during a game and physical capacity was assessed by a submaximal Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Ice-hockey test, level 1 (YYIR1-IHSUB). Venous blood samples were collected 24-hour post-game to determine markers of muscle damage. Players performed 119 6 8 and 31 6 3 m-min21 of high intensity and sprint skating, respectively, during a game. Total distance covered was 4,606 6 219 m (2,260-6,749 m), of which high-intensity distance was 2042 6 97 m (757-3,026 m). Sprint-skating speed was 5-8% higher (p ≤ 0.05) in periods 1 and 2 vs. period 3 and overtime. Defensemen (D) covered 29% more (p ≤ 0.05) skating in total than forwards (F) and were on the ice 47% longer. However, F performed 54% more (p ≤ 0.05) high-intensity skating per minute than defensemen. Plasma creatine kinase (CK) was 338 6 45 (78-757) U L -1 24-hour post-game. Heart rate loading during YYIR1-IHSUB correlated inversely (p ≤ 0.05) to the frequency of high-intensity skating bouts (r = 20.55) and VO2max (r = 20.85) and positively to post-game CK (r = 0.49; p ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, ice hockey is a multiple-sprint sport that provokes fatigue in the latter half of a game. Forwards perform more intense skating than defensemen. Moreover, high-intensity game activities during top-class ice hockey are correlated with cardiovascular loading during a submaximal skating test. Taken together, training of elite icehockey players should improve the ability for repeated highintensity skating, and testing should include the YYIR1-IHSUB test as an indicator for ice-hockey-specific physical match performance.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Vol/bind32
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)1303-1310
ISSN1064-8011
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. maj 2018

Fingeraftryk

Skating
Hockey
Muscles

Citer dette

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title = "Analysis of High-Intensity Skating in Top-Class Ice Hockey Match-Play in Relation to Training Status and Muscle Damage",
abstract = "We examined high-intensity activities in a top-class ice-hockey game and the effect of training status. Male ice-hockey players (n = 36) from the National Hockey League participated. Match analysis was performed during a game and physical capacity was assessed by a submaximal Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Ice-hockey test, level 1 (YYIR1-IHSUB). Venous blood samples were collected 24-hour post-game to determine markers of muscle damage. Players performed 119 6 8 and 31 6 3 m-min21 of high intensity and sprint skating, respectively, during a game. Total distance covered was 4,606 6 219 m (2,260-6,749 m), of which high-intensity distance was 2042 6 97 m (757-3,026 m). Sprint-skating speed was 5-8{\%} higher (p ≤ 0.05) in periods 1 and 2 vs. period 3 and overtime. Defensemen (D) covered 29{\%} more (p ≤ 0.05) skating in total than forwards (F) and were on the ice 47{\%} longer. However, F performed 54{\%} more (p ≤ 0.05) high-intensity skating per minute than defensemen. Plasma creatine kinase (CK) was 338 6 45 (78-757) U L -1 24-hour post-game. Heart rate loading during YYIR1-IHSUB correlated inversely (p ≤ 0.05) to the frequency of high-intensity skating bouts (r = 20.55) and VO2max (r = 20.85) and positively to post-game CK (r = 0.49; p ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, ice hockey is a multiple-sprint sport that provokes fatigue in the latter half of a game. Forwards perform more intense skating than defensemen. Moreover, high-intensity game activities during top-class ice hockey are correlated with cardiovascular loading during a submaximal skating test. Taken together, training of elite icehockey players should improve the ability for repeated highintensity skating, and testing should include the YYIR1-IHSUB test as an indicator for ice-hockey-specific physical match performance.",
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Analysis of High-Intensity Skating in Top-Class Ice Hockey Match-Play in Relation to Training Status and Muscle Damage. / Lignell, Erik; Fransson, Dan; Krustrup, Peter; Mohr, Magni.

I: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Bind 32, Nr. 5, 01.05.2018, s. 1303-1310.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Analysis of High-Intensity Skating in Top-Class Ice Hockey Match-Play in Relation to Training Status and Muscle Damage

AU - Lignell, Erik

AU - Fransson, Dan

AU - Krustrup, Peter

AU - Mohr, Magni

PY - 2018/5/1

Y1 - 2018/5/1

N2 - We examined high-intensity activities in a top-class ice-hockey game and the effect of training status. Male ice-hockey players (n = 36) from the National Hockey League participated. Match analysis was performed during a game and physical capacity was assessed by a submaximal Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Ice-hockey test, level 1 (YYIR1-IHSUB). Venous blood samples were collected 24-hour post-game to determine markers of muscle damage. Players performed 119 6 8 and 31 6 3 m-min21 of high intensity and sprint skating, respectively, during a game. Total distance covered was 4,606 6 219 m (2,260-6,749 m), of which high-intensity distance was 2042 6 97 m (757-3,026 m). Sprint-skating speed was 5-8% higher (p ≤ 0.05) in periods 1 and 2 vs. period 3 and overtime. Defensemen (D) covered 29% more (p ≤ 0.05) skating in total than forwards (F) and were on the ice 47% longer. However, F performed 54% more (p ≤ 0.05) high-intensity skating per minute than defensemen. Plasma creatine kinase (CK) was 338 6 45 (78-757) U L -1 24-hour post-game. Heart rate loading during YYIR1-IHSUB correlated inversely (p ≤ 0.05) to the frequency of high-intensity skating bouts (r = 20.55) and VO2max (r = 20.85) and positively to post-game CK (r = 0.49; p ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, ice hockey is a multiple-sprint sport that provokes fatigue in the latter half of a game. Forwards perform more intense skating than defensemen. Moreover, high-intensity game activities during top-class ice hockey are correlated with cardiovascular loading during a submaximal skating test. Taken together, training of elite icehockey players should improve the ability for repeated highintensity skating, and testing should include the YYIR1-IHSUB test as an indicator for ice-hockey-specific physical match performance.

AB - We examined high-intensity activities in a top-class ice-hockey game and the effect of training status. Male ice-hockey players (n = 36) from the National Hockey League participated. Match analysis was performed during a game and physical capacity was assessed by a submaximal Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Ice-hockey test, level 1 (YYIR1-IHSUB). Venous blood samples were collected 24-hour post-game to determine markers of muscle damage. Players performed 119 6 8 and 31 6 3 m-min21 of high intensity and sprint skating, respectively, during a game. Total distance covered was 4,606 6 219 m (2,260-6,749 m), of which high-intensity distance was 2042 6 97 m (757-3,026 m). Sprint-skating speed was 5-8% higher (p ≤ 0.05) in periods 1 and 2 vs. period 3 and overtime. Defensemen (D) covered 29% more (p ≤ 0.05) skating in total than forwards (F) and were on the ice 47% longer. However, F performed 54% more (p ≤ 0.05) high-intensity skating per minute than defensemen. Plasma creatine kinase (CK) was 338 6 45 (78-757) U L -1 24-hour post-game. Heart rate loading during YYIR1-IHSUB correlated inversely (p ≤ 0.05) to the frequency of high-intensity skating bouts (r = 20.55) and VO2max (r = 20.85) and positively to post-game CK (r = 0.49; p ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, ice hockey is a multiple-sprint sport that provokes fatigue in the latter half of a game. Forwards perform more intense skating than defensemen. Moreover, high-intensity game activities during top-class ice hockey are correlated with cardiovascular loading during a submaximal skating test. Taken together, training of elite icehockey players should improve the ability for repeated highintensity skating, and testing should include the YYIR1-IHSUB test as an indicator for ice-hockey-specific physical match performance.

KW - elite athletes

KW - fitness testing

KW - intermittent exercise

KW - match analysis

KW - performance

KW - team sports

U2 - 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001999

DO - 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001999

M3 - Journal article

VL - 32

SP - 1303

EP - 1310

JO - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

JF - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

SN - 1064-8011

IS - 5

ER -