Anaesthesia for the growing brain

Divya Raviraj, Thomas Engelhardt, Tom Giedsing Hansen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Despite the long history of paediatric anaesthesia, there is still much to be discovered regarding how exposure to anaesthesia affects the developing brain. Given that commonly used anaesthetic agents are thought to exert their effect via N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) and gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors, it is biologically plausible that exposure during periods of vulnerable brain development may affect long term outcome. There are numerous animal studies which suggest lasting neurological changes. However, whether this risk also applies to humans is unclear given the varying physiological development of different species and humans. Human studies are emerging and ongoing and their results are producing conflicting data. The purpose of this review is to summarize the currently available evidence and consider how this may be used to minimize harm to the paediatric population undergoing anaesthesia.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftCurrent Pharmaceutical Design
Vol/bind25
Udgave nummer19
Sider (fra-til)2165-2170
ISSN1381-6128
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2019

Fingeraftryk

Pediatrics
GABA Receptors
N-Methylaspartate
History
Population

Bibliografisk note

Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.net.

Citer dette

Raviraj, Divya ; Engelhardt, Thomas ; Hansen, Tom Giedsing. / Anaesthesia for the growing brain. I: Current Pharmaceutical Design. 2019 ; Bind 25, Nr. 19. s. 2165-2170.
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Anaesthesia for the growing brain. / Raviraj, Divya; Engelhardt, Thomas; Hansen, Tom Giedsing.

I: Current Pharmaceutical Design, Bind 25, Nr. 19, 2019, s. 2165-2170.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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AU - Hansen, Tom Giedsing

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