An Assessment of the Multifunctionality of Integrated Buffer Zones in Northwestern Europe

Dominik Henrik Zak, Marc Stutter, Henning S. Jensen, Sara Egemose, Mette Vodder Carstensen, Joachim Audet, John A. Strand, Peter Feuerbach, Carl Christian Hoffmann, Benjamin Christen, Sandra Hille, Mads Knudsen, Jenni Stockan, Helen Watson, Goswin Johann Heckrath, Brian Kronvang

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Resumé

Integrated buffer zones (IBZs) have recently been introduced in the Northwestern Europe temperate zone to improve delivery of ecosystem services compared with the services associated with long-established vegetated buffer zones. A common feature of all the studied IBZ sites is that tile drainage, which previously discharged directly into the streams, is now intercepted within the IBZ. Specifically, the design of IBZs combines a pond, where soil particles present in drain water or surface runoff can be deposited, and a planted subsurface flow infiltration zone. Together, these two components should provide an optimum environment for microbial processes and plant uptake of nutrients. Nutrient reduction capacities, biodiversity enhancement, and biomass production functions were assessed with different emphasis across 11 IBZ sites located in Denmark, Great Britain, and Sweden. Despite the small size of the buffer zones (250–800 m2) and thus the small proportion of the drained catchment (mostly <1%), these studies cumulatively suggest that IBZs are effective enhancements to traditional buffer zones, as they (i) reduce total N and P loads to small streams and rivers, (ii) act as valuable improved habitats for aquatic and amphibian species, and (iii) offer economic benefits by producing fast-growing wetland plant biomass. Based on our assessment of the pilot sites, guidance is provided on the implementation and management of IBZs within agricultural landscapes.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Environmental Quality
Vol/bind48
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)362-375
ISSN0047-2425
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 17. jan. 2019

Fingeraftryk

buffer zone
Nutrients
Biomass
Biodiversity
Ponds
Wetlands
Tile
Runoff
Infiltration
Catchments
Ecosystems
Drainage
Rivers
Soils
Economics
Water
Europe
nutrient
biomass
subsurface flow

Citer dette

Zak, Dominik Henrik ; Stutter, Marc ; Jensen, Henning S. ; Egemose, Sara ; Carstensen, Mette Vodder ; Audet, Joachim ; Strand, John A. ; Feuerbach, Peter ; Hoffmann, Carl Christian ; Christen, Benjamin ; Hille, Sandra ; Knudsen, Mads ; Stockan, Jenni ; Watson, Helen ; Heckrath, Goswin Johann ; Kronvang, Brian. / An Assessment of the Multifunctionality of Integrated Buffer Zones in Northwestern Europe. I: Journal of Environmental Quality. 2019 ; Bind 48, Nr. 2. s. 362-375.
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abstract = "Integrated buffer zones (IBZs) have recently been introduced in the Northwestern Europe temperate zone to improve delivery of ecosystem services compared with the services associated with long-established vegetated buffer zones. A common feature of all the studied IBZ sites is that tile drainage, which previously discharged directly into the streams, is now intercepted within the IBZ. Specifically, the design of IBZs combines a pond, where soil particles present in drain water or surface runoff can be deposited, and a planted subsurface flow infiltration zone. Together, these two components should provide an optimum environment for microbial processes and plant uptake of nutrients. Nutrient reduction capacities, biodiversity enhancement, and biomass production functions were assessed with different emphasis across 11 IBZ sites located in Denmark, Great Britain, and Sweden. Despite the small size of the buffer zones (250–800 m2) and thus the small proportion of the drained catchment (mostly <1{\%}), these studies cumulatively suggest that IBZs are effective enhancements to traditional buffer zones, as they (i) reduce total N and P loads to small streams and rivers, (ii) act as valuable improved habitats for aquatic and amphibian species, and (iii) offer economic benefits by producing fast-growing wetland plant biomass. Based on our assessment of the pilot sites, guidance is provided on the implementation and management of IBZs within agricultural landscapes.",
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author = "Zak, {Dominik Henrik} and Marc Stutter and Jensen, {Henning S.} and Sara Egemose and Carstensen, {Mette Vodder} and Joachim Audet and Strand, {John A.} and Peter Feuerbach and Hoffmann, {Carl Christian} and Benjamin Christen and Sandra Hille and Mads Knudsen and Jenni Stockan and Helen Watson and Heckrath, {Goswin Johann} and Brian Kronvang",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
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Zak, DH, Stutter, M, Jensen, HS, Egemose, S, Carstensen, MV, Audet, J, Strand, JA, Feuerbach, P, Hoffmann, CC, Christen, B, Hille, S, Knudsen, M, Stockan, J, Watson, H, Heckrath, GJ & Kronvang, B 2019, 'An Assessment of the Multifunctionality of Integrated Buffer Zones in Northwestern Europe', Journal of Environmental Quality, bind 48, nr. 2, s. 362-375. https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2018.05.0216

An Assessment of the Multifunctionality of Integrated Buffer Zones in Northwestern Europe. / Zak, Dominik Henrik; Stutter, Marc; Jensen, Henning S.; Egemose, Sara; Carstensen, Mette Vodder; Audet, Joachim; Strand, John A. ; Feuerbach, Peter; Hoffmann, Carl Christian; Christen, Benjamin; Hille, Sandra; Knudsen, Mads; Stockan, Jenni; Watson, Helen; Heckrath, Goswin Johann; Kronvang, Brian.

I: Journal of Environmental Quality, Bind 48, Nr. 2, 17.01.2019, s. 362-375.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - An Assessment of the Multifunctionality of Integrated Buffer Zones in Northwestern Europe

AU - Zak, Dominik Henrik

AU - Stutter, Marc

AU - Jensen, Henning S.

AU - Egemose, Sara

AU - Carstensen, Mette Vodder

AU - Audet, Joachim

AU - Strand, John A.

AU - Feuerbach, Peter

AU - Hoffmann, Carl Christian

AU - Christen, Benjamin

AU - Hille, Sandra

AU - Knudsen, Mads

AU - Stockan, Jenni

AU - Watson, Helen

AU - Heckrath, Goswin Johann

AU - Kronvang, Brian

PY - 2019/1/17

Y1 - 2019/1/17

N2 - Integrated buffer zones (IBZs) have recently been introduced in the Northwestern Europe temperate zone to improve delivery of ecosystem services compared with the services associated with long-established vegetated buffer zones. A common feature of all the studied IBZ sites is that tile drainage, which previously discharged directly into the streams, is now intercepted within the IBZ. Specifically, the design of IBZs combines a pond, where soil particles present in drain water or surface runoff can be deposited, and a planted subsurface flow infiltration zone. Together, these two components should provide an optimum environment for microbial processes and plant uptake of nutrients. Nutrient reduction capacities, biodiversity enhancement, and biomass production functions were assessed with different emphasis across 11 IBZ sites located in Denmark, Great Britain, and Sweden. Despite the small size of the buffer zones (250–800 m2) and thus the small proportion of the drained catchment (mostly <1%), these studies cumulatively suggest that IBZs are effective enhancements to traditional buffer zones, as they (i) reduce total N and P loads to small streams and rivers, (ii) act as valuable improved habitats for aquatic and amphibian species, and (iii) offer economic benefits by producing fast-growing wetland plant biomass. Based on our assessment of the pilot sites, guidance is provided on the implementation and management of IBZs within agricultural landscapes.

AB - Integrated buffer zones (IBZs) have recently been introduced in the Northwestern Europe temperate zone to improve delivery of ecosystem services compared with the services associated with long-established vegetated buffer zones. A common feature of all the studied IBZ sites is that tile drainage, which previously discharged directly into the streams, is now intercepted within the IBZ. Specifically, the design of IBZs combines a pond, where soil particles present in drain water or surface runoff can be deposited, and a planted subsurface flow infiltration zone. Together, these two components should provide an optimum environment for microbial processes and plant uptake of nutrients. Nutrient reduction capacities, biodiversity enhancement, and biomass production functions were assessed with different emphasis across 11 IBZ sites located in Denmark, Great Britain, and Sweden. Despite the small size of the buffer zones (250–800 m2) and thus the small proportion of the drained catchment (mostly <1%), these studies cumulatively suggest that IBZs are effective enhancements to traditional buffer zones, as they (i) reduce total N and P loads to small streams and rivers, (ii) act as valuable improved habitats for aquatic and amphibian species, and (iii) offer economic benefits by producing fast-growing wetland plant biomass. Based on our assessment of the pilot sites, guidance is provided on the implementation and management of IBZs within agricultural landscapes.

KW - Agriculture

KW - Biodegradation, Environmental

KW - Biomass

KW - Conservation of Natural Resources

KW - Ecosystem

KW - Environmental Monitoring

KW - Europe

KW - Non-Point Source Pollution/prevention & control

KW - Phosphorus/analysis

KW - Plants

KW - Rivers

KW - Soil

KW - Sweden

KW - Water Movements

KW - Wetlands

U2 - 10.2134/jeq2018.05.0216

DO - 10.2134/jeq2018.05.0216

M3 - Journal article

VL - 48

SP - 362

EP - 375

JO - Journal of Environmental Quality

JF - Journal of Environmental Quality

SN - 0047-2425

IS - 2

ER -