An assessment of differences in costs and health benefits of serology and NAT screening of donations for blood transfusion in different Western countries

ABO RBDM Health Economics and Outcomes Working Group & Collaborators, Kjell Titlestad (Medlem af forfattergruppering)

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Background and Objectives: The cost-utility of safety interventions is becoming increasingly important as a driver of implementation decisions. The aim of this study was to compare the cost-utility of different blood screening strategies in various settings, and to analyse the extent and cause of differences in health economic results. Materials and Methods: For eight Western countries (Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, The Netherlands, UK and the United States of America), data were collected on donor and recipient populations, blood products, screening tests, and on patient treatment practices and costs. An existing ISBT web-tool model was used to assess the cost-utility of various strategies for HIV, HCV and HBV screening. Results: The cost-utility ratio of serology screening for these eight countries ranges between −11 000 and 92 000 US$ per QALY, and for NAT between −12 000 and 113 000 US$ per QALY when compared to no screening. Combined serology and NAT ranges between 600 and 217 000 US$ per QALY. The incremental cost-utility of NAT after implementation of serology screening ranges from 2 231 000 to 15 778 000 US$ per QALY. Conclusion: There are substantial differences in costs per QALY between countries for various HIV, HBV and HCV screening strategies. These differences are primarily caused by costs of screening tests and infection rates in the donor population. Within each country, similar cost per QALY results for serology and NAT compared to no screening, coupled with evidence of limited value of serology and NAT together prompts the need for further discussion on the acceptability of parallel testing by serology and NAT.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftVox Sanguinis
Vol/bind112
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)518-525
ISSN0042-9007
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 29. aug. 2017

Fingeraftryk

Insurance Benefits
Serology
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
HIV
Western Australia
Denmark
Finland
Netherlands
Population
France
Safety
Health

Citer dette

@article{e1df8f515f074945adf6f19c5d11e37d,
title = "An assessment of differences in costs and health benefits of serology and NAT screening of donations for blood transfusion in different Western countries",
abstract = "Background and Objectives: The cost-utility of safety interventions is becoming increasingly important as a driver of implementation decisions. The aim of this study was to compare the cost-utility of different blood screening strategies in various settings, and to analyse the extent and cause of differences in health economic results. Materials and Methods: For eight Western countries (Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, The Netherlands, UK and the United States of America), data were collected on donor and recipient populations, blood products, screening tests, and on patient treatment practices and costs. An existing ISBT web-tool model was used to assess the cost-utility of various strategies for HIV, HCV and HBV screening. Results: The cost-utility ratio of serology screening for these eight countries ranges between −11 000 and 92 000 US$ per QALY, and for NAT between −12 000 and 113 000 US$ per QALY when compared to no screening. Combined serology and NAT ranges between 600 and 217 000 US$ per QALY. The incremental cost-utility of NAT after implementation of serology screening ranges from 2 231 000 to 15 778 000 US$ per QALY. Conclusion: There are substantial differences in costs per QALY between countries for various HIV, HBV and HCV screening strategies. These differences are primarily caused by costs of screening tests and infection rates in the donor population. Within each country, similar cost per QALY results for serology and NAT compared to no screening, coupled with evidence of limited value of serology and NAT together prompts the need for further discussion on the acceptability of parallel testing by serology and NAT.",
keywords = "blood screening, cost-utility, health economics, international comparison",
author = "Janssen, {M. P.} and {van Hulst}, M. and B. Custer and {ABO RBDM Health Economics and Outcomes Working Group & Collaborators} and Bennett, {Judie Leach} and Peter McDonald and Jay Menitove and Peter Tomasulo and Tina Viner and Sheila Ward and Su Brailsford and Kwei Chu and J{\o}rgen Georgsen and Hansen, {Morten Bagge} and Patrick Heney and Anthony Keller and Tom Krusius and Marsh, {Daniel C.} and Eeva Nyberg-Oksanen and Sheila O'Brien and Nina Prunier and Stramer, {Susan L.} and Pierre Tiberghien and {van Weert}, Anton and Kjell Titlestad",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
day = "29",
doi = "10.1111/vox.12543",
language = "English",
volume = "112",
pages = "518--525",
journal = "Vox Sanguinis",
issn = "0042-9007",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

An assessment of differences in costs and health benefits of serology and NAT screening of donations for blood transfusion in different Western countries. / ABO RBDM Health Economics and Outcomes Working Group & Collaborators ; Titlestad, Kjell (Medlem af forfattergruppering).

I: Vox Sanguinis, Bind 112, Nr. 6, 29.08.2017, s. 518-525.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - An assessment of differences in costs and health benefits of serology and NAT screening of donations for blood transfusion in different Western countries

AU - Janssen, M. P.

AU - van Hulst, M.

AU - Custer, B.

AU - ABO RBDM Health Economics and Outcomes Working Group & Collaborators

A2 - Bennett, Judie Leach

A2 - McDonald, Peter

A2 - Menitove, Jay

A2 - Tomasulo, Peter

A2 - Viner, Tina

A2 - Ward, Sheila

A2 - Brailsford, Su

A2 - Chu, Kwei

A2 - Georgsen, Jørgen

A2 - Hansen, Morten Bagge

A2 - Heney, Patrick

A2 - Keller, Anthony

A2 - Krusius, Tom

A2 - Marsh, Daniel C.

A2 - Nyberg-Oksanen, Eeva

A2 - O'Brien, Sheila

A2 - Prunier, Nina

A2 - Stramer, Susan L.

A2 - Tiberghien, Pierre

A2 - van Weert, Anton

A2 - Titlestad, Kjell

PY - 2017/8/29

Y1 - 2017/8/29

N2 - Background and Objectives: The cost-utility of safety interventions is becoming increasingly important as a driver of implementation decisions. The aim of this study was to compare the cost-utility of different blood screening strategies in various settings, and to analyse the extent and cause of differences in health economic results. Materials and Methods: For eight Western countries (Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, The Netherlands, UK and the United States of America), data were collected on donor and recipient populations, blood products, screening tests, and on patient treatment practices and costs. An existing ISBT web-tool model was used to assess the cost-utility of various strategies for HIV, HCV and HBV screening. Results: The cost-utility ratio of serology screening for these eight countries ranges between −11 000 and 92 000 US$ per QALY, and for NAT between −12 000 and 113 000 US$ per QALY when compared to no screening. Combined serology and NAT ranges between 600 and 217 000 US$ per QALY. The incremental cost-utility of NAT after implementation of serology screening ranges from 2 231 000 to 15 778 000 US$ per QALY. Conclusion: There are substantial differences in costs per QALY between countries for various HIV, HBV and HCV screening strategies. These differences are primarily caused by costs of screening tests and infection rates in the donor population. Within each country, similar cost per QALY results for serology and NAT compared to no screening, coupled with evidence of limited value of serology and NAT together prompts the need for further discussion on the acceptability of parallel testing by serology and NAT.

AB - Background and Objectives: The cost-utility of safety interventions is becoming increasingly important as a driver of implementation decisions. The aim of this study was to compare the cost-utility of different blood screening strategies in various settings, and to analyse the extent and cause of differences in health economic results. Materials and Methods: For eight Western countries (Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, The Netherlands, UK and the United States of America), data were collected on donor and recipient populations, blood products, screening tests, and on patient treatment practices and costs. An existing ISBT web-tool model was used to assess the cost-utility of various strategies for HIV, HCV and HBV screening. Results: The cost-utility ratio of serology screening for these eight countries ranges between −11 000 and 92 000 US$ per QALY, and for NAT between −12 000 and 113 000 US$ per QALY when compared to no screening. Combined serology and NAT ranges between 600 and 217 000 US$ per QALY. The incremental cost-utility of NAT after implementation of serology screening ranges from 2 231 000 to 15 778 000 US$ per QALY. Conclusion: There are substantial differences in costs per QALY between countries for various HIV, HBV and HCV screening strategies. These differences are primarily caused by costs of screening tests and infection rates in the donor population. Within each country, similar cost per QALY results for serology and NAT compared to no screening, coupled with evidence of limited value of serology and NAT together prompts the need for further discussion on the acceptability of parallel testing by serology and NAT.

KW - blood screening

KW - cost-utility

KW - health economics

KW - international comparison

UR - https://doi.org/10.1111/vox.12611

U2 - 10.1111/vox.12543

DO - 10.1111/vox.12543

M3 - Journal article

VL - 112

SP - 518

EP - 525

JO - Vox Sanguinis

JF - Vox Sanguinis

SN - 0042-9007

IS - 6

ER -