An Actor-Partner Interdependence Model of Acquired Brain Injury Patient Impairments and Caregiver Psychosocial Functioning: A Dyadic-Report, Multinational Study

Paul B Perrin, Anne Norup, Alfonso Caracuel, Andrew Bateman, Morten Tjørnlund, Juan Carlos Arango-Lasprilla

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to use actor-partner interdependence modeling (APIM) to examine the simultaneous effects of both acquired brain injury (ABI) patient and caregiver ratings of patient impairments on both patient and caregiver ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction.METHOD: A sample of 968 individuals with ABI and their caregivers (n = 1,936) from 4 countries completed the European Brain Injury Questionnaire, a measure of ABI impairments and caregiver psychosocial functioning in the context of providing care for the person with ABI.RESULTS: An APIM with all adequate or good fit indices found that patient ratings of their own impairments in the domains of social disadaptation and depression were uniquely and positively associated with patient ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction, yet none of the patient ratings of their own impairments were uniquely associated with caregiver ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction. Caregiver ratings of patient impairments across all 3 domains (cognition, social disadaptation, and depression) were uniquely and positively associated with caregiver ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction. Yet only caregiver ratings of patient social disadaptation were uniquely and positively associated with patient ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction.CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that caregivers' views of ABI patients' impairments are likely much more associated with caregiver psychosocial functioning than are patients' views of their own impairments, pointing to caregivers' interpretations of their patients' impairments as a primary target for cognitive behavioral interventions.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Clinical Psychology
Vol/bind73
Udgave nummer3
Sider (fra-til)279-293
ISSN0021-9762
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017
Udgivet eksterntJa

Bibliografisk note

© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Citer dette

Perrin, Paul B ; Norup, Anne ; Caracuel, Alfonso ; Bateman, Andrew ; Tjørnlund, Morten ; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos. / An Actor-Partner Interdependence Model of Acquired Brain Injury Patient Impairments and Caregiver Psychosocial Functioning: A Dyadic-Report, Multinational Study. I: Journal of Clinical Psychology. 2017 ; Bind 73, Nr. 3. s. 279-293.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to use actor-partner interdependence modeling (APIM) to examine the simultaneous effects of both acquired brain injury (ABI) patient and caregiver ratings of patient impairments on both patient and caregiver ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction.METHOD: A sample of 968 individuals with ABI and their caregivers (n = 1,936) from 4 countries completed the European Brain Injury Questionnaire, a measure of ABI impairments and caregiver psychosocial functioning in the context of providing care for the person with ABI.RESULTS: An APIM with all adequate or good fit indices found that patient ratings of their own impairments in the domains of social disadaptation and depression were uniquely and positively associated with patient ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction, yet none of the patient ratings of their own impairments were uniquely associated with caregiver ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction. Caregiver ratings of patient impairments across all 3 domains (cognition, social disadaptation, and depression) were uniquely and positively associated with caregiver ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction. Yet only caregiver ratings of patient social disadaptation were uniquely and positively associated with patient ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction.CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that caregivers' views of ABI patients' impairments are likely much more associated with caregiver psychosocial functioning than are patients' views of their own impairments, pointing to caregivers' interpretations of their patients' impairments as a primary target for cognitive behavioral interventions.",
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An Actor-Partner Interdependence Model of Acquired Brain Injury Patient Impairments and Caregiver Psychosocial Functioning: A Dyadic-Report, Multinational Study. / Perrin, Paul B; Norup, Anne; Caracuel, Alfonso; Bateman, Andrew; Tjørnlund, Morten; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos.

I: Journal of Clinical Psychology, Bind 73, Nr. 3, 2017, s. 279-293.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - An Actor-Partner Interdependence Model of Acquired Brain Injury Patient Impairments and Caregiver Psychosocial Functioning: A Dyadic-Report, Multinational Study

AU - Perrin, Paul B

AU - Norup, Anne

AU - Caracuel, Alfonso

AU - Bateman, Andrew

AU - Tjørnlund, Morten

AU - Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos

N1 - © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to use actor-partner interdependence modeling (APIM) to examine the simultaneous effects of both acquired brain injury (ABI) patient and caregiver ratings of patient impairments on both patient and caregiver ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction.METHOD: A sample of 968 individuals with ABI and their caregivers (n = 1,936) from 4 countries completed the European Brain Injury Questionnaire, a measure of ABI impairments and caregiver psychosocial functioning in the context of providing care for the person with ABI.RESULTS: An APIM with all adequate or good fit indices found that patient ratings of their own impairments in the domains of social disadaptation and depression were uniquely and positively associated with patient ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction, yet none of the patient ratings of their own impairments were uniquely associated with caregiver ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction. Caregiver ratings of patient impairments across all 3 domains (cognition, social disadaptation, and depression) were uniquely and positively associated with caregiver ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction. Yet only caregiver ratings of patient social disadaptation were uniquely and positively associated with patient ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction.CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that caregivers' views of ABI patients' impairments are likely much more associated with caregiver psychosocial functioning than are patients' views of their own impairments, pointing to caregivers' interpretations of their patients' impairments as a primary target for cognitive behavioral interventions.

AB - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to use actor-partner interdependence modeling (APIM) to examine the simultaneous effects of both acquired brain injury (ABI) patient and caregiver ratings of patient impairments on both patient and caregiver ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction.METHOD: A sample of 968 individuals with ABI and their caregivers (n = 1,936) from 4 countries completed the European Brain Injury Questionnaire, a measure of ABI impairments and caregiver psychosocial functioning in the context of providing care for the person with ABI.RESULTS: An APIM with all adequate or good fit indices found that patient ratings of their own impairments in the domains of social disadaptation and depression were uniquely and positively associated with patient ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction, yet none of the patient ratings of their own impairments were uniquely associated with caregiver ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction. Caregiver ratings of patient impairments across all 3 domains (cognition, social disadaptation, and depression) were uniquely and positively associated with caregiver ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction. Yet only caregiver ratings of patient social disadaptation were uniquely and positively associated with patient ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction.CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that caregivers' views of ABI patients' impairments are likely much more associated with caregiver psychosocial functioning than are patients' views of their own impairments, pointing to caregivers' interpretations of their patients' impairments as a primary target for cognitive behavioral interventions.

U2 - 10.1002/jclp.22324

DO - 10.1002/jclp.22324

M3 - Journal article

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VL - 73

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EP - 293

JO - Journal of Clinical Psychology

JF - Journal of Clinical Psychology

SN - 0021-9762

IS - 3

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