Alcohol intake and colorectal cancer: a comparison of approaches for including repeated measures of alcohol consumption.

Lau Caspar Thygesen, Kana Wu, Morten Grønbaek, Charles S Fuchs, Walter C Willett, Edward Giovannucci

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Mar
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEpidemiology
Vol/bind19
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)258-64
Antal sider6
ISSN1044-3983
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. mar. 2008

Fingeraftryk

Alcohol Drinking
Colorectal Neoplasms
Alcohols
Confidence Intervals
Health

Citer dette

Thygesen, Lau Caspar ; Wu, Kana ; Grønbaek, Morten ; Fuchs, Charles S ; Willett, Walter C ; Giovannucci, Edward. / Alcohol intake and colorectal cancer: a comparison of approaches for including repeated measures of alcohol consumption. I: Epidemiology. 2008 ; Bind 19, Nr. 2. s. 258-64.
@article{b04ebae0480c11dd9fbe000ea68e967b,
title = "Alcohol intake and colorectal cancer: a comparison of approaches for including repeated measures of alcohol consumption.",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: In numerous studies, alcohol intake has been found to be positively associated with colorectal cancer risk. However, the majority of studies included only one exposure measurement, which may bias the results if long-term intake is relevant.METHODS: We compared different approaches for including repeated measures of alcohol intake among 47,432 US men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Questionnaires including questions on alcohol intake had been completed in 1986, 1990, 1994, and 1998. The outcome was incident colorectal cancer during follow-up from 1986 to 2002.RESULTS: During follow-up, 868 members of the cohort experienced colorectal cancer. Baseline, updated, and cumulative average alcohol intakes were positively associated with colorectal cancer, with only minor differences among the approaches. These results support moderately increased risk for intake >30 g/d and weaker increased risk for lower intake. The hazard ratio for baseline alcohol intake was 1.07 (95{\%} confidence interval = 1.02-1.11) per 10 g/d increase, which was similar for updated and cumulative average alcohol intake. Consistent moderate and high alcohol intake showed increased risk, and the relative risk decreased slightly with longer latency time. Alcohol frequency was positively associated with cancer risk among men with alcohol intake above 15 g/d.CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol intake was positively associated with colorectal cancer, with minor differences among analytic approaches (which may be attributable to low intraindividual variation during follow-up).",
author = "Thygesen, {Lau Caspar} and Kana Wu and Morten Gr{\o}nbaek and Fuchs, {Charles S} and Willett, {Walter C} and Edward Giovannucci",
year = "2008",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/EDE.0b013e31816339e0",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "258--64",
journal = "Epidemiology",
issn = "1044-3983",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

Alcohol intake and colorectal cancer: a comparison of approaches for including repeated measures of alcohol consumption. / Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Wu, Kana; Grønbaek, Morten; Fuchs, Charles S; Willett, Walter C; Giovannucci, Edward.

I: Epidemiology, Bind 19, Nr. 2, 01.03.2008, s. 258-64.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Alcohol intake and colorectal cancer: a comparison of approaches for including repeated measures of alcohol consumption.

AU - Thygesen, Lau Caspar

AU - Wu, Kana

AU - Grønbaek, Morten

AU - Fuchs, Charles S

AU - Willett, Walter C

AU - Giovannucci, Edward

PY - 2008/3/1

Y1 - 2008/3/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: In numerous studies, alcohol intake has been found to be positively associated with colorectal cancer risk. However, the majority of studies included only one exposure measurement, which may bias the results if long-term intake is relevant.METHODS: We compared different approaches for including repeated measures of alcohol intake among 47,432 US men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Questionnaires including questions on alcohol intake had been completed in 1986, 1990, 1994, and 1998. The outcome was incident colorectal cancer during follow-up from 1986 to 2002.RESULTS: During follow-up, 868 members of the cohort experienced colorectal cancer. Baseline, updated, and cumulative average alcohol intakes were positively associated with colorectal cancer, with only minor differences among the approaches. These results support moderately increased risk for intake >30 g/d and weaker increased risk for lower intake. The hazard ratio for baseline alcohol intake was 1.07 (95% confidence interval = 1.02-1.11) per 10 g/d increase, which was similar for updated and cumulative average alcohol intake. Consistent moderate and high alcohol intake showed increased risk, and the relative risk decreased slightly with longer latency time. Alcohol frequency was positively associated with cancer risk among men with alcohol intake above 15 g/d.CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol intake was positively associated with colorectal cancer, with minor differences among analytic approaches (which may be attributable to low intraindividual variation during follow-up).

AB - BACKGROUND: In numerous studies, alcohol intake has been found to be positively associated with colorectal cancer risk. However, the majority of studies included only one exposure measurement, which may bias the results if long-term intake is relevant.METHODS: We compared different approaches for including repeated measures of alcohol intake among 47,432 US men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Questionnaires including questions on alcohol intake had been completed in 1986, 1990, 1994, and 1998. The outcome was incident colorectal cancer during follow-up from 1986 to 2002.RESULTS: During follow-up, 868 members of the cohort experienced colorectal cancer. Baseline, updated, and cumulative average alcohol intakes were positively associated with colorectal cancer, with only minor differences among the approaches. These results support moderately increased risk for intake >30 g/d and weaker increased risk for lower intake. The hazard ratio for baseline alcohol intake was 1.07 (95% confidence interval = 1.02-1.11) per 10 g/d increase, which was similar for updated and cumulative average alcohol intake. Consistent moderate and high alcohol intake showed increased risk, and the relative risk decreased slightly with longer latency time. Alcohol frequency was positively associated with cancer risk among men with alcohol intake above 15 g/d.CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol intake was positively associated with colorectal cancer, with minor differences among analytic approaches (which may be attributable to low intraindividual variation during follow-up).

U2 - 10.1097/EDE.0b013e31816339e0

DO - 10.1097/EDE.0b013e31816339e0

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 18300715

VL - 19

SP - 258

EP - 264

JO - Epidemiology

JF - Epidemiology

SN - 1044-3983

IS - 2

ER -