Alcohol drinking frequency in relation to subsequent changes in waist circumference.

Janne S Tolstrup, Jytte Halkjaer, Berit Lilienthal Heitmann, Anne M Tjønneland, Kim Overvad, Thorkild I A Sørensen, Morten Grønbæk

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Apr
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Vol/bind87
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)957-63
Antal sider6
ISSN0002-9165
StatusUdgivet - 1. apr. 2008

Fingeraftryk

Alcohol Drinking
Drinking
Alcohols
Prospective Studies
Abdominal Obesity
Linear Models
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio

Citer dette

@article{605082105d6211ddb1a1000ea68e967b,
title = "Alcohol drinking frequency in relation to subsequent changes in waist circumference.",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Cross-sectional studies have reported a lower prevalence of abdominal obese persons among frequent drinkers than among nonfrequent drinkers. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that drinking frequency is associated with subsequent changes in waist circumference. DESIGN: Data come from a prospective cohort study conducted in 1993-1997 (baseline) and 1999-2002 (follow-up) and included 43 543 men and women. Baseline information on alcohol drinking frequency was related to 1) change in waist circumference by linear regression and 2) major gain and major loss in waist circumference (defined as waist change in the lowest or highest quintile of waist changes) by polytomous logistic regression, also taking into account amount of alcohol intake. RESULTS: Drinking frequency was inversely associated with changes in waist circumference in women and was unassociated with changes in waist circumference in men. Drinking frequency was unassociated with major waist loss but was inversely associated with major waist gain: odds ratios among men were 0.97 (95{\%} CI: 0.73, 1.28), 0.95 (95{\%} CI: 0.81, 1.12), 0.88 (95{\%} CI: 0.77, 0.99), 0.82 (95{\%} CI: 0.71, -0.95), and 0.79 (95{\%} CI: 0.69, 0.9) for never drinking, drinking on 1, 2-4, 5-6, and 7 d/wk, respectively, compared with men who drank alcohol on <1 d/wk (P for trend < 0.0001). Results for women were similar. Adjustment for the amount of alcohol intake or total energy intake did not affect results considerably. CONCLUSIONS: Drinking pattern may be associated with development of abdominal obesity; in this prospective study, drinking frequency was inversely associated with major waist gain and was unassociated with major waist loss.",
keywords = "Abdominal Fat, Alcohol Drinking, Body Mass Index, Body Size, Cohort Studies, Confidence Intervals, Cross-Sectional Studies, Denmark, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Odds Ratio, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, Questionnaires, Sex Factors, Statistics, Nonparametric, Waist-Hip Ratio",
author = "Tolstrup, {Janne S} and Jytte Halkjaer and Heitmann, {Berit Lilienthal} and Tj{\o}nneland, {Anne M} and Kim Overvad and S{\o}rensen, {Thorkild I A} and Morten Gr{\o}nb{\ae}k",
year = "2008",
month = "4",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "87",
pages = "957--63",
journal = "The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "AMER SOC NUTRITION-ASN",
number = "4",

}

Alcohol drinking frequency in relation to subsequent changes in waist circumference. / Tolstrup, Janne S; Halkjaer, Jytte; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal; Tjønneland, Anne M; Overvad, Kim; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Grønbæk, Morten.

I: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Bind 87, Nr. 4, 01.04.2008, s. 957-63.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Alcohol drinking frequency in relation to subsequent changes in waist circumference.

AU - Tolstrup, Janne S

AU - Halkjaer, Jytte

AU - Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

AU - Tjønneland, Anne M

AU - Overvad, Kim

AU - Sørensen, Thorkild I A

AU - Grønbæk, Morten

PY - 2008/4/1

Y1 - 2008/4/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Cross-sectional studies have reported a lower prevalence of abdominal obese persons among frequent drinkers than among nonfrequent drinkers. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that drinking frequency is associated with subsequent changes in waist circumference. DESIGN: Data come from a prospective cohort study conducted in 1993-1997 (baseline) and 1999-2002 (follow-up) and included 43 543 men and women. Baseline information on alcohol drinking frequency was related to 1) change in waist circumference by linear regression and 2) major gain and major loss in waist circumference (defined as waist change in the lowest or highest quintile of waist changes) by polytomous logistic regression, also taking into account amount of alcohol intake. RESULTS: Drinking frequency was inversely associated with changes in waist circumference in women and was unassociated with changes in waist circumference in men. Drinking frequency was unassociated with major waist loss but was inversely associated with major waist gain: odds ratios among men were 0.97 (95% CI: 0.73, 1.28), 0.95 (95% CI: 0.81, 1.12), 0.88 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.99), 0.82 (95% CI: 0.71, -0.95), and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.69, 0.9) for never drinking, drinking on 1, 2-4, 5-6, and 7 d/wk, respectively, compared with men who drank alcohol on <1 d/wk (P for trend < 0.0001). Results for women were similar. Adjustment for the amount of alcohol intake or total energy intake did not affect results considerably. CONCLUSIONS: Drinking pattern may be associated with development of abdominal obesity; in this prospective study, drinking frequency was inversely associated with major waist gain and was unassociated with major waist loss.

AB - BACKGROUND: Cross-sectional studies have reported a lower prevalence of abdominal obese persons among frequent drinkers than among nonfrequent drinkers. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that drinking frequency is associated with subsequent changes in waist circumference. DESIGN: Data come from a prospective cohort study conducted in 1993-1997 (baseline) and 1999-2002 (follow-up) and included 43 543 men and women. Baseline information on alcohol drinking frequency was related to 1) change in waist circumference by linear regression and 2) major gain and major loss in waist circumference (defined as waist change in the lowest or highest quintile of waist changes) by polytomous logistic regression, also taking into account amount of alcohol intake. RESULTS: Drinking frequency was inversely associated with changes in waist circumference in women and was unassociated with changes in waist circumference in men. Drinking frequency was unassociated with major waist loss but was inversely associated with major waist gain: odds ratios among men were 0.97 (95% CI: 0.73, 1.28), 0.95 (95% CI: 0.81, 1.12), 0.88 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.99), 0.82 (95% CI: 0.71, -0.95), and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.69, 0.9) for never drinking, drinking on 1, 2-4, 5-6, and 7 d/wk, respectively, compared with men who drank alcohol on <1 d/wk (P for trend < 0.0001). Results for women were similar. Adjustment for the amount of alcohol intake or total energy intake did not affect results considerably. CONCLUSIONS: Drinking pattern may be associated with development of abdominal obesity; in this prospective study, drinking frequency was inversely associated with major waist gain and was unassociated with major waist loss.

KW - Abdominal Fat

KW - Alcohol Drinking

KW - Body Mass Index

KW - Body Size

KW - Cohort Studies

KW - Confidence Intervals

KW - Cross-Sectional Studies

KW - Denmark

KW - Dose-Response Relationship, Drug

KW - Female

KW - Follow-Up Studies

KW - Humans

KW - Logistic Models

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Obesity

KW - Odds Ratio

KW - Prevalence

KW - Prospective Studies

KW - Questionnaires

KW - Sex Factors

KW - Statistics, Nonparametric

KW - Waist-Hip Ratio

M3 - Journal article

VL - 87

SP - 957

EP - 963

JO - The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 4

ER -