A small jab - a big effect: nonspecific immunomodulation by vaccines

Christine Stabell Benn, Mihai G Netea, Liisa K Selin, Peter Aaby

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Recent epidemiological studies have shown that, in addition to disease-specific effects, vaccines against infectious diseases have nonspecific effects on the ability of the immune system to handle other pathogens. For instance, in randomized trials tuberculosis and measles vaccines are associated with a substantial reduction in overall child mortality, which cannot be explained by prevention of the target disease. New research suggests that the nonspecific effects of vaccines are related to cross-reactivity of the adaptive immune system with unrelated pathogens, and to training of the innate immune system through epigenetic reprogramming. Hence, epidemiological findings are backed by immunological data. This generates a new understanding of the immune system and about how it can be modulated by vaccines to impact the general resistance to disease.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftTrends in Immunology
Vol/bind34
Udgave nummer9
Sider (fra-til)431-439
Antal sider9
ISSN1471-4906
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2013

Fingeraftryk

Immune System
Child Mortality
Epigenomics
Epidemiologic Studies
Research

Emneord

    Citer dette

    Benn, Christine Stabell ; Netea, Mihai G ; Selin, Liisa K ; Aaby, Peter. / A small jab - a big effect : nonspecific immunomodulation by vaccines. I: Trends in Immunology. 2013 ; Bind 34, Nr. 9. s. 431-439.
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    A small jab - a big effect : nonspecific immunomodulation by vaccines. / Benn, Christine Stabell; Netea, Mihai G; Selin, Liisa K; Aaby, Peter.

    I: Trends in Immunology, Bind 34, Nr. 9, 2013, s. 431-439.

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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    AU - Netea, Mihai G

    AU - Selin, Liisa K

    AU - Aaby, Peter

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