A randomised controlled trial to improve general practitioners' services in cancer rehabilitation: Effects on general practitioners' proactivity and on patients' participation in rehabilitation activities

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Resumé

Abstract Few studies have evaluated initiatives targeting implementation of cancer rehabilitation. In this study we aim to test the effects of a complex intervention designed to improve general practitioners' (GPs) involvement in cancer rehabilitation. Outcomes were proactive contacts to patients by their GP reported by the patients and GPs, respectively, and patients' participation in rehabilitation activities. Methods. Cluster randomised controlled trial. All general practices in Denmark were randomised to an intervention group or to a control group (usual procedures). Patients were subsequently allocated to the intervention or the control group based on randomisation status of their GP. Between May 2008 and February 2009, adult patients treated for incident cancer at Vejle Hospital, Denmark, were assessed for eligibility. A total of 323 general practices were included, allocating 486 patients to an intervention and 469 to a control group. The intervention included a patient interview about rehabilitation with a rehabilitation coordinator at the hospital, comprehensive information to the GP about individual needs for rehabilitation, and an encouragement to the GP to contact the patient proactively. Questionnaires were administered to patients and GPs at 14 months after inclusion. Results. At baseline average age of patients was 63 years and 72% were female. The most frequent cancer localisations were breast (43%), lung (15%), and malignant melanoma (8%). The intervention had no effect on either patient- or GP-reported extent of GP proactivity. Further, no effect was observed on patient participation in rehabilitation activities during the 14-month follow-up period. Discussion. The intervention had no effect on GP proactivity or on patient participation in rehabilitation activities. However, analyses showed a significant association between proactivity and participation and we, therefore, conclude that increased GP proactivity may facilitate patient participation in rehabilitation activities.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftActa Oncologica
Vol/bind52
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)400-9
Antal sider10
ISSN0284-186X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2013

Fingeraftryk

Patient Participation
General Practitioners
Randomized Controlled Trials
Neoplasms
Denmark
General Practice
Control Groups
Random Allocation
Melanoma

Citer dette

@article{1b10d8463cc344a78aa9c385d07c2656,
title = "A randomised controlled trial to improve general practitioners' services in cancer rehabilitation: Effects on general practitioners' proactivity and on patients' participation in rehabilitation activities",
abstract = "Abstract Few studies have evaluated initiatives targeting implementation of cancer rehabilitation. In this study we aim to test the effects of a complex intervention designed to improve general practitioners' (GPs) involvement in cancer rehabilitation. Outcomes were proactive contacts to patients by their GP reported by the patients and GPs, respectively, and patients' participation in rehabilitation activities. Methods. Cluster randomised controlled trial. All general practices in Denmark were randomised to an intervention group or to a control group (usual procedures). Patients were subsequently allocated to the intervention or the control group based on randomisation status of their GP. Between May 2008 and February 2009, adult patients treated for incident cancer at Vejle Hospital, Denmark, were assessed for eligibility. A total of 323 general practices were included, allocating 486 patients to an intervention and 469 to a control group. The intervention included a patient interview about rehabilitation with a rehabilitation coordinator at the hospital, comprehensive information to the GP about individual needs for rehabilitation, and an encouragement to the GP to contact the patient proactively. Questionnaires were administered to patients and GPs at 14 months after inclusion. Results. At baseline average age of patients was 63 years and 72{\%} were female. The most frequent cancer localisations were breast (43{\%}), lung (15{\%}), and malignant melanoma (8{\%}). The intervention had no effect on either patient- or GP-reported extent of GP proactivity. Further, no effect was observed on patient participation in rehabilitation activities during the 14-month follow-up period. Discussion. The intervention had no effect on GP proactivity or on patient participation in rehabilitation activities. However, analyses showed a significant association between proactivity and participation and we, therefore, conclude that increased GP proactivity may facilitate patient participation in rehabilitation activities.",
author = "Bergholdt, {Stinne Holm} and Jens S{\o}ndergaard and Larsen, {Pia Veldt} and Holm, {Lise Vilstrup} and Jakob Kragstrup and Hansen, {Dorte Gils{\aa}}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.3109/0284186X.2012.741711",
language = "English",
volume = "52",
pages = "400--9",
journal = "Acta Oncologica",
issn = "0284-186X",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "2",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - A randomised controlled trial to improve general practitioners' services in cancer rehabilitation

T2 - Effects on general practitioners' proactivity and on patients' participation in rehabilitation activities

AU - Bergholdt, Stinne Holm

AU - Søndergaard, Jens

AU - Larsen, Pia Veldt

AU - Holm, Lise Vilstrup

AU - Kragstrup, Jakob

AU - Hansen, Dorte Gilså

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Abstract Few studies have evaluated initiatives targeting implementation of cancer rehabilitation. In this study we aim to test the effects of a complex intervention designed to improve general practitioners' (GPs) involvement in cancer rehabilitation. Outcomes were proactive contacts to patients by their GP reported by the patients and GPs, respectively, and patients' participation in rehabilitation activities. Methods. Cluster randomised controlled trial. All general practices in Denmark were randomised to an intervention group or to a control group (usual procedures). Patients were subsequently allocated to the intervention or the control group based on randomisation status of their GP. Between May 2008 and February 2009, adult patients treated for incident cancer at Vejle Hospital, Denmark, were assessed for eligibility. A total of 323 general practices were included, allocating 486 patients to an intervention and 469 to a control group. The intervention included a patient interview about rehabilitation with a rehabilitation coordinator at the hospital, comprehensive information to the GP about individual needs for rehabilitation, and an encouragement to the GP to contact the patient proactively. Questionnaires were administered to patients and GPs at 14 months after inclusion. Results. At baseline average age of patients was 63 years and 72% were female. The most frequent cancer localisations were breast (43%), lung (15%), and malignant melanoma (8%). The intervention had no effect on either patient- or GP-reported extent of GP proactivity. Further, no effect was observed on patient participation in rehabilitation activities during the 14-month follow-up period. Discussion. The intervention had no effect on GP proactivity or on patient participation in rehabilitation activities. However, analyses showed a significant association between proactivity and participation and we, therefore, conclude that increased GP proactivity may facilitate patient participation in rehabilitation activities.

AB - Abstract Few studies have evaluated initiatives targeting implementation of cancer rehabilitation. In this study we aim to test the effects of a complex intervention designed to improve general practitioners' (GPs) involvement in cancer rehabilitation. Outcomes were proactive contacts to patients by their GP reported by the patients and GPs, respectively, and patients' participation in rehabilitation activities. Methods. Cluster randomised controlled trial. All general practices in Denmark were randomised to an intervention group or to a control group (usual procedures). Patients were subsequently allocated to the intervention or the control group based on randomisation status of their GP. Between May 2008 and February 2009, adult patients treated for incident cancer at Vejle Hospital, Denmark, were assessed for eligibility. A total of 323 general practices were included, allocating 486 patients to an intervention and 469 to a control group. The intervention included a patient interview about rehabilitation with a rehabilitation coordinator at the hospital, comprehensive information to the GP about individual needs for rehabilitation, and an encouragement to the GP to contact the patient proactively. Questionnaires were administered to patients and GPs at 14 months after inclusion. Results. At baseline average age of patients was 63 years and 72% were female. The most frequent cancer localisations were breast (43%), lung (15%), and malignant melanoma (8%). The intervention had no effect on either patient- or GP-reported extent of GP proactivity. Further, no effect was observed on patient participation in rehabilitation activities during the 14-month follow-up period. Discussion. The intervention had no effect on GP proactivity or on patient participation in rehabilitation activities. However, analyses showed a significant association between proactivity and participation and we, therefore, conclude that increased GP proactivity may facilitate patient participation in rehabilitation activities.

U2 - 10.3109/0284186X.2012.741711

DO - 10.3109/0284186X.2012.741711

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 23173759

VL - 52

SP - 400

EP - 409

JO - Acta Oncologica

JF - Acta Oncologica

SN - 0284-186X

IS - 2

ER -