A qualitative study of how caseload midwifery is experienced by couples in Denmark

Ingrid Jepsen, Edith Mark, Maralyn Jean Foureur, Ellen A Nøhr, Erik Elgaard Sørensen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: Caseload midwifery is expanding in Denmark. There is a need for elaborating in-depth, how caseload midwifery influences the partner and the woman during childbirth and how this model of care influences the early phases of labour.

AIM: To follow, explore and elaborate women's and their partner's experiences of caseload midwifery.

METHODS: Phenomenology of practice was the analytical approach. The methodology was inspired by ethnography, and applied methods were field observations followed by interviews. Ten couples participated in the study. Most of the couples were observed from the onset of labour until childbirth. Afterwards, the couples were interviewed.

FINDINGS: The transition from home to hospital in early labour was experienced as positive. During birth, the partner felt involved and included by the midwife. The midwives remembered and recognized the couple's stories and wishes for childbirth and therefore they felt regarded as "more than numbers". Irrespective of different kinds of vulnerability or challenges among the participants, the relationship was named a professional friendship, characterised by equality and inclusiveness. One drawback of caseload midwifery was that the woman was at risk of being disappointed if her expectations of having a known midwife at birth were not fulfilled.

KEY CONCLUSIONS: From the perspective of women and their partners, attending caseload midwifery meant being recognised and cared for as an individual. The partner felt included and acknowledged and experienced working in a team with the midwife. Caseload midwifery was able to solve problems concerning labour onset or gaining access to the labour ward.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftWomen and Birth
Vol/bind30
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)e61-e69
ISSN1871-5192
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. feb. 2017

Fingeraftryk

Midwifery
Denmark
Interviews

Citer dette

Jepsen, Ingrid ; Mark, Edith ; Foureur, Maralyn Jean ; Nøhr, Ellen A ; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard. / A qualitative study of how caseload midwifery is experienced by couples in Denmark. I: Women and Birth. 2017 ; Bind 30, Nr. 1. s. e61-e69.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Caseload midwifery is expanding in Denmark. There is a need for elaborating in-depth, how caseload midwifery influences the partner and the woman during childbirth and how this model of care influences the early phases of labour.AIM: To follow, explore and elaborate women's and their partner's experiences of caseload midwifery.METHODS: Phenomenology of practice was the analytical approach. The methodology was inspired by ethnography, and applied methods were field observations followed by interviews. Ten couples participated in the study. Most of the couples were observed from the onset of labour until childbirth. Afterwards, the couples were interviewed.FINDINGS: The transition from home to hospital in early labour was experienced as positive. During birth, the partner felt involved and included by the midwife. The midwives remembered and recognized the couple's stories and wishes for childbirth and therefore they felt regarded as {"}more than numbers{"}. Irrespective of different kinds of vulnerability or challenges among the participants, the relationship was named a professional friendship, characterised by equality and inclusiveness. One drawback of caseload midwifery was that the woman was at risk of being disappointed if her expectations of having a known midwife at birth were not fulfilled.KEY CONCLUSIONS: From the perspective of women and their partners, attending caseload midwifery meant being recognised and cared for as an individual. The partner felt included and acknowledged and experienced working in a team with the midwife. Caseload midwifery was able to solve problems concerning labour onset or gaining access to the labour ward.",
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A qualitative study of how caseload midwifery is experienced by couples in Denmark. / Jepsen, Ingrid; Mark, Edith; Foureur, Maralyn Jean; Nøhr, Ellen A; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard.

I: Women and Birth, Bind 30, Nr. 1, 01.02.2017, s. e61-e69.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - A qualitative study of how caseload midwifery is experienced by couples in Denmark

AU - Jepsen, Ingrid

AU - Mark, Edith

AU - Foureur, Maralyn Jean

AU - Nøhr, Ellen A

AU - Sørensen, Erik Elgaard

N1 - Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2017/2/1

Y1 - 2017/2/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Caseload midwifery is expanding in Denmark. There is a need for elaborating in-depth, how caseload midwifery influences the partner and the woman during childbirth and how this model of care influences the early phases of labour.AIM: To follow, explore and elaborate women's and their partner's experiences of caseload midwifery.METHODS: Phenomenology of practice was the analytical approach. The methodology was inspired by ethnography, and applied methods were field observations followed by interviews. Ten couples participated in the study. Most of the couples were observed from the onset of labour until childbirth. Afterwards, the couples were interviewed.FINDINGS: The transition from home to hospital in early labour was experienced as positive. During birth, the partner felt involved and included by the midwife. The midwives remembered and recognized the couple's stories and wishes for childbirth and therefore they felt regarded as "more than numbers". Irrespective of different kinds of vulnerability or challenges among the participants, the relationship was named a professional friendship, characterised by equality and inclusiveness. One drawback of caseload midwifery was that the woman was at risk of being disappointed if her expectations of having a known midwife at birth were not fulfilled.KEY CONCLUSIONS: From the perspective of women and their partners, attending caseload midwifery meant being recognised and cared for as an individual. The partner felt included and acknowledged and experienced working in a team with the midwife. Caseload midwifery was able to solve problems concerning labour onset or gaining access to the labour ward.

AB - BACKGROUND: Caseload midwifery is expanding in Denmark. There is a need for elaborating in-depth, how caseload midwifery influences the partner and the woman during childbirth and how this model of care influences the early phases of labour.AIM: To follow, explore and elaborate women's and their partner's experiences of caseload midwifery.METHODS: Phenomenology of practice was the analytical approach. The methodology was inspired by ethnography, and applied methods were field observations followed by interviews. Ten couples participated in the study. Most of the couples were observed from the onset of labour until childbirth. Afterwards, the couples were interviewed.FINDINGS: The transition from home to hospital in early labour was experienced as positive. During birth, the partner felt involved and included by the midwife. The midwives remembered and recognized the couple's stories and wishes for childbirth and therefore they felt regarded as "more than numbers". Irrespective of different kinds of vulnerability or challenges among the participants, the relationship was named a professional friendship, characterised by equality and inclusiveness. One drawback of caseload midwifery was that the woman was at risk of being disappointed if her expectations of having a known midwife at birth were not fulfilled.KEY CONCLUSIONS: From the perspective of women and their partners, attending caseload midwifery meant being recognised and cared for as an individual. The partner felt included and acknowledged and experienced working in a team with the midwife. Caseload midwifery was able to solve problems concerning labour onset or gaining access to the labour ward.

KW - Caseload midwifery

KW - Continuity of care

KW - Participants’ experiences

KW - Qualitative research

KW - The partners’ role

U2 - 10.1016/j.wombi.2016.09.003

DO - 10.1016/j.wombi.2016.09.003

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27665216

VL - 30

SP - e61-e69

JO - Women and Birth

JF - Women and Birth

SN - 1871-5192

IS - 1

ER -