A multivariate dynamic systems model for psychotherapy with more than one client

Jonathan E. Butner, Carlene Deits-Lebehn, Alexander O. Crenshaw, Travis J. Wiltshire, Nicholas S. Perry, Robert G. Kent de Grey, Jasara N. Hogan, Timothy W. Smith, Katherine J.W. Baucom, Brian R.W. Baucom

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

The dynamics of the give and take between therapist and client(s) is frequently of interest to therapy process researchers. Characterizing the ways that therapists respond to clients and clients respond to therapists can be challenging in therapeutic encounters involving a single therapist and a single client. The complexity of this challenge increases as the number of people involved in a therapeutic encounter increases not only because there are more people responding to one another but also because the patterns of responding can become more complex. This manuscript demonstrates how dyadic cross-lagged panel models can be extended to psychotherapeutic encounters involving 3 people and used to test processes that exist between dyadic subsets of the larger group as well as the group as one cohesive unit. Three hundred seventy-nine talk turns of fundamental frequency from a couple therapy session were modeled using 3 dyadic cross-lagged panel models, and each individual’s respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) was treated as a moderator. Although the regression coefficients for each dyadic subset (e.g., therapist–husband) were nonsignificant, an eigenvalue/eigenvector decomposition of the regression coefficients from the 3 dyadic cross-lagged panel models suggests that
interdependence exists at the level of the whole group (i.e., therapist–husband–wife) rather than between pairs of individuals within the group (e.g., husband–wife). Further, an interaction involving husband’s RSA suggested that interdependence involving the husband ceased when the husband displayed greater regulatory effort. This combination of statistical methods allows for clearly distinguishing between dyadic therapeutic processes and group-level therapeutic processes.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Counseling Psychology
Vol/bind64
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)616-625
ISSN0022-0167
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Fingeraftryk

Psychotherapy
Spouses
Couples Therapy
Research Personnel
Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia

Citer dette

Butner, J. E., Deits-Lebehn, C., Crenshaw, A. O., Wiltshire, T. J., Perry, N. S., Kent de Grey, R. G., ... Baucom, B. R. W. (2017). A multivariate dynamic systems model for psychotherapy with more than one client. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 64(6), 616-625. https://doi.org/10.1037/cou0000238
Butner, Jonathan E. ; Deits-Lebehn, Carlene ; Crenshaw, Alexander O. ; Wiltshire, Travis J. ; Perry, Nicholas S. ; Kent de Grey, Robert G. ; Hogan, Jasara N. ; Smith, Timothy W. ; Baucom, Katherine J.W. ; Baucom, Brian R.W. / A multivariate dynamic systems model for psychotherapy with more than one client. I: Journal of Counseling Psychology. 2017 ; Bind 64, Nr. 6. s. 616-625.
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abstract = "The dynamics of the give and take between therapist and client(s) is frequently of interest to therapy process researchers. Characterizing the ways that therapists respond to clients and clients respond to therapists can be challenging in therapeutic encounters involving a single therapist and a single client. The complexity of this challenge increases as the number of people involved in a therapeutic encounter increases not only because there are more people responding to one another but also because the patterns of responding can become more complex. This manuscript demonstrates how dyadic cross-lagged panel models can be extended to psychotherapeutic encounters involving 3 people and used to test processes that exist between dyadic subsets of the larger group as well as the group as one cohesive unit. Three hundred seventy-nine talk turns of fundamental frequency from a couple therapy session were modeled using 3 dyadic cross-lagged panel models, and each individual’s respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) was treated as a moderator. Although the regression coefficients for each dyadic subset (e.g., therapist–husband) were nonsignificant, an eigenvalue/eigenvector decomposition of the regression coefficients from the 3 dyadic cross-lagged panel models suggests thatinterdependence exists at the level of the whole group (i.e., therapist–husband–wife) rather than between pairs of individuals within the group (e.g., husband–wife). Further, an interaction involving husband’s RSA suggested that interdependence involving the husband ceased when the husband displayed greater regulatory effort. This combination of statistical methods allows for clearly distinguishing between dyadic therapeutic processes and group-level therapeutic processes.",
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author = "Butner, {Jonathan E.} and Carlene Deits-Lebehn and Crenshaw, {Alexander O.} and Wiltshire, {Travis J.} and Perry, {Nicholas S.} and {Kent de Grey}, {Robert G.} and Hogan, {Jasara N.} and Smith, {Timothy W.} and Baucom, {Katherine J.W.} and Baucom, {Brian R.W.}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1037/cou0000238",
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Butner, JE, Deits-Lebehn, C, Crenshaw, AO, Wiltshire, TJ, Perry, NS, Kent de Grey, RG, Hogan, JN, Smith, TW, Baucom, KJW & Baucom, BRW 2017, 'A multivariate dynamic systems model for psychotherapy with more than one client', Journal of Counseling Psychology, bind 64, nr. 6, s. 616-625. https://doi.org/10.1037/cou0000238

A multivariate dynamic systems model for psychotherapy with more than one client. / Butner, Jonathan E.; Deits-Lebehn, Carlene; Crenshaw, Alexander O.; Wiltshire, Travis J.; Perry, Nicholas S.; Kent de Grey, Robert G.; Hogan, Jasara N.; Smith, Timothy W.; Baucom, Katherine J.W.; Baucom, Brian R.W.

I: Journal of Counseling Psychology, Bind 64, Nr. 6, 2017, s. 616-625.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - A multivariate dynamic systems model for psychotherapy with more than one client

AU - Butner, Jonathan E.

AU - Deits-Lebehn, Carlene

AU - Crenshaw, Alexander O.

AU - Wiltshire, Travis J.

AU - Perry, Nicholas S.

AU - Kent de Grey, Robert G.

AU - Hogan, Jasara N.

AU - Smith, Timothy W.

AU - Baucom, Katherine J.W.

AU - Baucom, Brian R.W.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - The dynamics of the give and take between therapist and client(s) is frequently of interest to therapy process researchers. Characterizing the ways that therapists respond to clients and clients respond to therapists can be challenging in therapeutic encounters involving a single therapist and a single client. The complexity of this challenge increases as the number of people involved in a therapeutic encounter increases not only because there are more people responding to one another but also because the patterns of responding can become more complex. This manuscript demonstrates how dyadic cross-lagged panel models can be extended to psychotherapeutic encounters involving 3 people and used to test processes that exist between dyadic subsets of the larger group as well as the group as one cohesive unit. Three hundred seventy-nine talk turns of fundamental frequency from a couple therapy session were modeled using 3 dyadic cross-lagged panel models, and each individual’s respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) was treated as a moderator. Although the regression coefficients for each dyadic subset (e.g., therapist–husband) were nonsignificant, an eigenvalue/eigenvector decomposition of the regression coefficients from the 3 dyadic cross-lagged panel models suggests thatinterdependence exists at the level of the whole group (i.e., therapist–husband–wife) rather than between pairs of individuals within the group (e.g., husband–wife). Further, an interaction involving husband’s RSA suggested that interdependence involving the husband ceased when the husband displayed greater regulatory effort. This combination of statistical methods allows for clearly distinguishing between dyadic therapeutic processes and group-level therapeutic processes.

AB - The dynamics of the give and take between therapist and client(s) is frequently of interest to therapy process researchers. Characterizing the ways that therapists respond to clients and clients respond to therapists can be challenging in therapeutic encounters involving a single therapist and a single client. The complexity of this challenge increases as the number of people involved in a therapeutic encounter increases not only because there are more people responding to one another but also because the patterns of responding can become more complex. This manuscript demonstrates how dyadic cross-lagged panel models can be extended to psychotherapeutic encounters involving 3 people and used to test processes that exist between dyadic subsets of the larger group as well as the group as one cohesive unit. Three hundred seventy-nine talk turns of fundamental frequency from a couple therapy session were modeled using 3 dyadic cross-lagged panel models, and each individual’s respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) was treated as a moderator. Although the regression coefficients for each dyadic subset (e.g., therapist–husband) were nonsignificant, an eigenvalue/eigenvector decomposition of the regression coefficients from the 3 dyadic cross-lagged panel models suggests thatinterdependence exists at the level of the whole group (i.e., therapist–husband–wife) rather than between pairs of individuals within the group (e.g., husband–wife). Further, an interaction involving husband’s RSA suggested that interdependence involving the husband ceased when the husband displayed greater regulatory effort. This combination of statistical methods allows for clearly distinguishing between dyadic therapeutic processes and group-level therapeutic processes.

KW - couple therapy

KW - dynamical systems

KW - statistical methods

KW - therapeutic process

KW - Models, Theoretical

KW - Multivariate Analysis

KW - Professional-Patient Relations

KW - Couples Therapy/methods

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Psychotherapy/methods

KW - Group Processes

KW - Systems Analysis

KW - Adult

KW - Female

U2 - 10.1037/cou0000238

DO - 10.1037/cou0000238

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29154574

VL - 64

SP - 616

EP - 625

JO - Journal of Counseling Psychology

JF - Journal of Counseling Psychology

SN - 0022-0167

IS - 6

ER -