A disordered acidic domain in GPIHBP1 harboring a sulfated tyrosine regulates lipoprotein lipase

Kristian K. Kristensen, Søren Roi Midtgaard, Simon Mysling, Oleg Kovrov, Lars Bo Hansen, Nicholas Skar-Gislinge, Anne P. Beigneux, Birthe B. Kragelund, Gunilla Olivecrona, Stephen G. Young*, Thomas J.D. Jørgensen, Loren G. Fong, Michael Ploug

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Abstrakt

The intravascular processing of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins depends on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and GPIHBP1, a membrane protein of endothelial cells that binds LPL within the subendothelial spaces and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. In the absence of GPIHBP1, LPL remains mislocalized within the subendothelial spaces, causing severe hypertriglyceridemia (chylomicronemia). The N-terminal domain of GPIHBP1, an intrinsically disordered region (IDR) rich in acidic residues, is important for stabilizing LPL’s catalytic domain against spontaneous and ANGPTL4-catalyzed unfolding. Here, we define several important properties of GPIHBP1’s IDR. First, a conserved tyrosine in the middle of the IDR is posttranslationally modified by O-sulfation; this modification increases both the affinity of GPIHBP1–LPL interactions and the ability of GPIHBP1 to protect LPL against ANGPTL4-catalyzed unfolding. Second, the acidic IDR of GPIHBP1 increases the probability of a GPIHBP1–LPL encounter via electrostatic steering, increasing the association rate constant (kon) for LPL binding by >250-fold. Third, we show that LPL accumulates near capillary endothelial cells even in the absence of GPIHBP1. In wild-type mice, we expect that the accumulation of LPL in close proximity to capillaries would increase interactions with GPIHBP1. Fourth, we found that GPIHBP1’s IDR is not a key factor in the pathogenicity of chylomicronemia in patients with the GPIHBP1 autoimmune syndrome. Finally, based on biophysical studies, we propose that the negatively charged IDR of GPIHBP1 traverses a vast space, facilitating capture of LPL by capillary endothelial cells and simultaneously contributing to GPIHBP1’s ability to preserve LPL structure and activity.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol/bind115
Udgave nummer26
Sider (fra-til)E6020-E6029
ISSN0027-8424
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 26. jun. 2018

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