A 6,000-years record of atmospheric mercury accumulation in the high Arctic from peat deposits on Bathurst Island, Nunavut, Canada

N. Givelet*, F. Roos-Barraclough, Michael Evan Goodsite, W. Shotyk

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKonferenceartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

There is a growing interest in the atmospheric transport, deposition, and accumulation of anthropogenic Hg in the Arctic. To quantify the impact of industrial Hg emissions, the natural rate of atmospheric Hg accumulation must be known. Mercury concentration measurements and age dating of peat from the Canadian Arctic show that natural "background" Hg flux rather constant (ca. 1 microgram per sq. m per yr.) throughout the past 6,000 years. Mercury concentrations in surface peat layers are much higher, but chronology of these changes cannot be interpreted until more age dates are available. The elevated Hg concentrations in surface layers, however, are out of proportion with Br and Se, suggesting that there has been a significant human impact. Peat cores from southern Canada provide a record of atmospheric Hg accumulation extending back nine thousand years, with similar background fluxes. Thus, pre-anthropogenic Hg fluxes in the High Arctic were not significantly different from atmospheric Hg fluxes in the temperate Zone.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal de Physique IV : Colloque
Vol/bind107
Sider (fra-til)545-548
Antal sider3
ISSN1155-4339
StatusUdgivet - 2003
Udgivet eksterntJa
BegivenhedXII International Conference on Heavy Metals in the Environment - Grenoble, Frankrig
Varighed: 26. maj 200330. maj 2003

Konference

KonferenceXII International Conference on Heavy Metals in the Environment
LandFrankrig
ByGrenoble
Periode26/05/200330/05/2003

Fingeraftryk

peat
Peat
Mercury
Canada
Deposits
deposits
Fluxes
Industrial emissions
chronology
dating
surface layers
proportion

Bibliografisk note

Journal de Physique IV: Proceedings 2003; 107 (XIIth International Conference on Heavy Metals in the Environment, 2003, bd. 1)

Citer dette

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title = "A 6,000-years record of atmospheric mercury accumulation in the high Arctic from peat deposits on Bathurst Island, Nunavut, Canada",
abstract = "There is a growing interest in the atmospheric transport, deposition, and accumulation of anthropogenic Hg in the Arctic. To quantify the impact of industrial Hg emissions, the natural rate of atmospheric Hg accumulation must be known. Mercury concentration measurements and age dating of peat from the Canadian Arctic show that natural {"}background{"} Hg flux rather constant (ca. 1 microgram per sq. m per yr.) throughout the past 6,000 years. Mercury concentrations in surface peat layers are much higher, but chronology of these changes cannot be interpreted until more age dates are available. The elevated Hg concentrations in surface layers, however, are out of proportion with Br and Se, suggesting that there has been a significant human impact. Peat cores from southern Canada provide a record of atmospheric Hg accumulation extending back nine thousand years, with similar background fluxes. Thus, pre-anthropogenic Hg fluxes in the High Arctic were not significantly different from atmospheric Hg fluxes in the temperate Zone.",
author = "N. Givelet and F. Roos-Barraclough and Goodsite, {Michael Evan} and W. Shotyk",
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A 6,000-years record of atmospheric mercury accumulation in the high Arctic from peat deposits on Bathurst Island, Nunavut, Canada. / Givelet, N.; Roos-Barraclough, F.; Goodsite, Michael Evan; Shotyk, W.

I: Journal de Physique IV : Colloque, Bind 107, 2003, s. 545-548.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKonferenceartikelForskningpeer review

TY - GEN

T1 - A 6,000-years record of atmospheric mercury accumulation in the high Arctic from peat deposits on Bathurst Island, Nunavut, Canada

AU - Givelet, N.

AU - Roos-Barraclough, F.

AU - Goodsite, Michael Evan

AU - Shotyk, W.

N1 - Journal de Physique IV: Proceedings 2003; 107 (XIIth International Conference on Heavy Metals in the Environment, 2003, bd. 1)

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - There is a growing interest in the atmospheric transport, deposition, and accumulation of anthropogenic Hg in the Arctic. To quantify the impact of industrial Hg emissions, the natural rate of atmospheric Hg accumulation must be known. Mercury concentration measurements and age dating of peat from the Canadian Arctic show that natural "background" Hg flux rather constant (ca. 1 microgram per sq. m per yr.) throughout the past 6,000 years. Mercury concentrations in surface peat layers are much higher, but chronology of these changes cannot be interpreted until more age dates are available. The elevated Hg concentrations in surface layers, however, are out of proportion with Br and Se, suggesting that there has been a significant human impact. Peat cores from southern Canada provide a record of atmospheric Hg accumulation extending back nine thousand years, with similar background fluxes. Thus, pre-anthropogenic Hg fluxes in the High Arctic were not significantly different from atmospheric Hg fluxes in the temperate Zone.

AB - There is a growing interest in the atmospheric transport, deposition, and accumulation of anthropogenic Hg in the Arctic. To quantify the impact of industrial Hg emissions, the natural rate of atmospheric Hg accumulation must be known. Mercury concentration measurements and age dating of peat from the Canadian Arctic show that natural "background" Hg flux rather constant (ca. 1 microgram per sq. m per yr.) throughout the past 6,000 years. Mercury concentrations in surface peat layers are much higher, but chronology of these changes cannot be interpreted until more age dates are available. The elevated Hg concentrations in surface layers, however, are out of proportion with Br and Se, suggesting that there has been a significant human impact. Peat cores from southern Canada provide a record of atmospheric Hg accumulation extending back nine thousand years, with similar background fluxes. Thus, pre-anthropogenic Hg fluxes in the High Arctic were not significantly different from atmospheric Hg fluxes in the temperate Zone.

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M3 - Conference article

VL - 107

SP - 545

EP - 548

JO - European Physical Journal. Special Topics

JF - European Physical Journal. Special Topics

SN - 1951-6355

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