17-Beta estradiol and 4-nonylphenol delay smolt development and downstream migration in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar.

Steffen S Madsen, Søren Skovbølling, Christian Nielsen, Bodil Korsgaard

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

The effect of 17-beta estradiol (E2) and 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) on smoltification and downstream migration of Atlantic salmon was studied in an integrated laboratory and field study. In a stock of hatchery-raised 1-year-old salmon, smoltification progressed from February until late May as judged by increased gill Na+, K+ -ATPase activity and 24 h sea water (SW)-tolerance. Starting late March, three groups of 150 fish were each given 6 serial injections over 20 days of 2 µg/g body weight E2, 120 µg/g 4-NP dissolved in peanut oil or peanut oil (4 µl/g) as control. After the last injection, all fish were individually tagged (Passive Integrated Transponder tags) and a non-lethal gill biopsy was taken. Two days later (8 April), 100 fish per group were transported to the field site and released into a small stream. Smolt migration was registered by measuring arrival time at a trap downstream of the release site. Serum vitellogenin levels increased several-fold in both male and female E2- and 4-NP-treated fish. Overall, E2- and 4-NP-treatment impaired smolting as judged by elevated condition factor, reduced gill Na+, K+ -ATPase activity and alpha-subunit Na+, K+ -ATPase mRNA level, reduced muscle water content and increased mortality following 24 h SW-challenge. After release, control fish initiated downstream migration immediately, with 50% of the total number of migrants appearing in the trap within 10 days. E2- and 4-NP-treated fish appeared in the trap with a delay in comparison to controls of 6 and 8 days, respectively. After the smolt run, no fish were registered by electro-fishing upstream of the trap. The total number of fish reaching the trap and thus post-release survival was in the order control (81%), E2 (53%), 4-NP (12%). Representatives from all treatment groups held under simulated natural conditions in the laboratory survived 100% through the migration period, suggesting that a combination of behavioural and in-stream factors (predation by herons) may contribute to the differential mortality. The study indicates that short-term exposure to natural and environmental estrogens may impair smolt development and survival and delay subsequent downstream migration in Atlantic salmon.
Udgivelsesdato: 2004-Jun-10
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAquatic Toxicology
Vol/bind68
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)109-120
Antal sider11
ISSN0166-445X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 10. jun. 2004

Citer dette

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title = "17-Beta estradiol and 4-nonylphenol delay smolt development and downstream migration in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar.",
abstract = "The effect of 17-beta estradiol (E2) and 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) on smoltification and downstream migration of Atlantic salmon was studied in an integrated laboratory and field study. In a stock of hatchery-raised 1-year-old salmon, smoltification progressed from February until late May as judged by increased gill Na+, K+ -ATPase activity and 24 h sea water (SW)-tolerance. Starting late March, three groups of 150 fish were each given 6 serial injections over 20 days of 2 µg/g body weight E2, 120 µg/g 4-NP dissolved in peanut oil or peanut oil (4 µl/g) as control. After the last injection, all fish were individually tagged (Passive Integrated Transponder tags) and a non-lethal gill biopsy was taken. Two days later (8 April), 100 fish per group were transported to the field site and released into a small stream. Smolt migration was registered by measuring arrival time at a trap downstream of the release site. Serum vitellogenin levels increased several-fold in both male and female E2- and 4-NP-treated fish. Overall, E2- and 4-NP-treatment impaired smolting as judged by elevated condition factor, reduced gill Na+, K+ -ATPase activity and alpha-subunit Na+, K+ -ATPase mRNA level, reduced muscle water content and increased mortality following 24 h SW-challenge. After release, control fish initiated downstream migration immediately, with 50{\%} of the total number of migrants appearing in the trap within 10 days. E2- and 4-NP-treated fish appeared in the trap with a delay in comparison to controls of 6 and 8 days, respectively. After the smolt run, no fish were registered by electro-fishing upstream of the trap. The total number of fish reaching the trap and thus post-release survival was in the order control (81{\%}), E2 (53{\%}), 4-NP (12{\%}). Representatives from all treatment groups held under simulated natural conditions in the laboratory survived 100{\%} through the migration period, suggesting that a combination of behavioural and in-stream factors (predation by herons) may contribute to the differential mortality. The study indicates that short-term exposure to natural and environmental estrogens may impair smolt development and survival and delay subsequent downstream migration in Atlantic salmon. Udgivelsesdato: 2004-Jun-10",
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17-Beta estradiol and 4-nonylphenol delay smolt development and downstream migration in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar. / Madsen, Steffen S; Skovbølling, Søren; Nielsen, Christian; Korsgaard, Bodil.

I: Aquatic Toxicology, Bind 68, Nr. 2, 10.06.2004, s. 109-120.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - 17-Beta estradiol and 4-nonylphenol delay smolt development and downstream migration in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar.

AU - Madsen, Steffen S

AU - Skovbølling, Søren

AU - Nielsen, Christian

AU - Korsgaard, Bodil

PY - 2004/6/10

Y1 - 2004/6/10

N2 - The effect of 17-beta estradiol (E2) and 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) on smoltification and downstream migration of Atlantic salmon was studied in an integrated laboratory and field study. In a stock of hatchery-raised 1-year-old salmon, smoltification progressed from February until late May as judged by increased gill Na+, K+ -ATPase activity and 24 h sea water (SW)-tolerance. Starting late March, three groups of 150 fish were each given 6 serial injections over 20 days of 2 µg/g body weight E2, 120 µg/g 4-NP dissolved in peanut oil or peanut oil (4 µl/g) as control. After the last injection, all fish were individually tagged (Passive Integrated Transponder tags) and a non-lethal gill biopsy was taken. Two days later (8 April), 100 fish per group were transported to the field site and released into a small stream. Smolt migration was registered by measuring arrival time at a trap downstream of the release site. Serum vitellogenin levels increased several-fold in both male and female E2- and 4-NP-treated fish. Overall, E2- and 4-NP-treatment impaired smolting as judged by elevated condition factor, reduced gill Na+, K+ -ATPase activity and alpha-subunit Na+, K+ -ATPase mRNA level, reduced muscle water content and increased mortality following 24 h SW-challenge. After release, control fish initiated downstream migration immediately, with 50% of the total number of migrants appearing in the trap within 10 days. E2- and 4-NP-treated fish appeared in the trap with a delay in comparison to controls of 6 and 8 days, respectively. After the smolt run, no fish were registered by electro-fishing upstream of the trap. The total number of fish reaching the trap and thus post-release survival was in the order control (81%), E2 (53%), 4-NP (12%). Representatives from all treatment groups held under simulated natural conditions in the laboratory survived 100% through the migration period, suggesting that a combination of behavioural and in-stream factors (predation by herons) may contribute to the differential mortality. The study indicates that short-term exposure to natural and environmental estrogens may impair smolt development and survival and delay subsequent downstream migration in Atlantic salmon. Udgivelsesdato: 2004-Jun-10

AB - The effect of 17-beta estradiol (E2) and 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) on smoltification and downstream migration of Atlantic salmon was studied in an integrated laboratory and field study. In a stock of hatchery-raised 1-year-old salmon, smoltification progressed from February until late May as judged by increased gill Na+, K+ -ATPase activity and 24 h sea water (SW)-tolerance. Starting late March, three groups of 150 fish were each given 6 serial injections over 20 days of 2 µg/g body weight E2, 120 µg/g 4-NP dissolved in peanut oil or peanut oil (4 µl/g) as control. After the last injection, all fish were individually tagged (Passive Integrated Transponder tags) and a non-lethal gill biopsy was taken. Two days later (8 April), 100 fish per group were transported to the field site and released into a small stream. Smolt migration was registered by measuring arrival time at a trap downstream of the release site. Serum vitellogenin levels increased several-fold in both male and female E2- and 4-NP-treated fish. Overall, E2- and 4-NP-treatment impaired smolting as judged by elevated condition factor, reduced gill Na+, K+ -ATPase activity and alpha-subunit Na+, K+ -ATPase mRNA level, reduced muscle water content and increased mortality following 24 h SW-challenge. After release, control fish initiated downstream migration immediately, with 50% of the total number of migrants appearing in the trap within 10 days. E2- and 4-NP-treated fish appeared in the trap with a delay in comparison to controls of 6 and 8 days, respectively. After the smolt run, no fish were registered by electro-fishing upstream of the trap. The total number of fish reaching the trap and thus post-release survival was in the order control (81%), E2 (53%), 4-NP (12%). Representatives from all treatment groups held under simulated natural conditions in the laboratory survived 100% through the migration period, suggesting that a combination of behavioural and in-stream factors (predation by herons) may contribute to the differential mortality. The study indicates that short-term exposure to natural and environmental estrogens may impair smolt development and survival and delay subsequent downstream migration in Atlantic salmon. Udgivelsesdato: 2004-Jun-10

KW - Salmon Migration

KW - Xenobiotics

KW - Estradiol

KW - RNA, Messenger

KW - Salmo salar

KW - Seawater

KW - Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase

KW - Vitellogenins

U2 - 10.1016/j.aquatox.2004.03.008

DO - 10.1016/j.aquatox.2004.03.008

M3 - Journal article

VL - 68

SP - 109

EP - 120

JO - Aquatic Toxicology

JF - Aquatic Toxicology

SN - 0166-445X

IS - 2

ER -