Causes for Late onset Alcohol Use Disorder: a Critical Systematic Review.

Bidragets oversatte titel: Årsager til sent påbegyndte alkoholproblemer: et kritisk systematisk review

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskningpeer review

Resumé

Introduction
One subgroup among elderly with AUD is the “late-onset” abusers. Late-onset (60+ years) AUD seems to be a milder, more narrowly defined psychiatric problem, than early or midlife onset AUD. This review seeks to expand the description and understanding of late-onset AUD by reviewing the available literature on the subject.

Method
A PRISMA style review and search was performed in late May 2014 and covered MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and PsychInfo. Inclusion was based on if the study had causes for late-onset AUD in their results section. This revealed 24 articles relevant for this study. After a full read and quality assessment, only eight studies were included in the final review.

Results
Inherent differences in measurements, methodologies and outcome measures in the studies, made it impossible to do a meta-analysis. Instead, we performed a descriptive assessment of the results from the studies.
The results of this review are generally inconclusive. In spite of the low quality scores, we did find that chronic stress, role/identity loss and friends approval of drinking, was associated with an increased risk for late-onset AUD whereas retirement, death of spouse or close relative does not increase the risk for late-onset AUD. However, the data was insufficient to give a reliable quantification of these associations.

Discussion
A common problem for the studies included (and the ones excluded as well) was the lack of common definitions of late-onset, “stress” and “traumatic life events”. This makes the results seem far removed from the participants, and is an area that is ripe for further research. Most of the research we have uncovered seems to be based on presumptions about how and why AUD occurs, and no special interest has been taken in uncovering what is intrinsically different between late-onset AUD and other kinds of AUD.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato31. maj 2015
StatusUdgivet - 31. maj 2015
BegivenhedInternational Conference of Treatment of Addictive Behaviour : Treating addictions where we find them - Odense, Danmark
Varighed: 31. maj 20154. jun. 2015
Konferencens nummer: 13

Konference

KonferenceInternational Conference of Treatment of Addictive Behaviour
Nummer13
LandDanmark
ByOdense
Periode31/05/201504/06/2015

Emneord

  • Alkohol
  • Alkohol Problemer
  • Ældre
  • Review

Citer dette

Emiliussen, J., Nielsen, A. S., & Andersen, K. (2015). Causes for Late onset Alcohol Use Disorder: a Critical Systematic Review.. Poster session præsenteret på International Conference of Treatment of Addictive Behaviour , Odense, Danmark.
Emiliussen, Jakob ; Nielsen, Anette Søgaard ; Andersen, Kjeld. / Causes for Late onset Alcohol Use Disorder : a Critical Systematic Review. Poster session præsenteret på International Conference of Treatment of Addictive Behaviour , Odense, Danmark.
@conference{c519b01c79544c0cbfab9a0e1a6b069e,
title = "Causes for Late onset Alcohol Use Disorder: a Critical Systematic Review.",
abstract = "IntroductionOne subgroup among elderly with AUD is the “late-onset” abusers. Late-onset (60+ years) AUD seems to be a milder, more narrowly defined psychiatric problem, than early or midlife onset AUD. This review seeks to expand the description and understanding of late-onset AUD by reviewing the available literature on the subject.MethodA PRISMA style review and search was performed in late May 2014 and covered MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and PsychInfo. Inclusion was based on if the study had causes for late-onset AUD in their results section. This revealed 24 articles relevant for this study. After a full read and quality assessment, only eight studies were included in the final review.ResultsInherent differences in measurements, methodologies and outcome measures in the studies, made it impossible to do a meta-analysis. Instead, we performed a descriptive assessment of the results from the studies.The results of this review are generally inconclusive. In spite of the low quality scores, we did find that chronic stress, role/identity loss and friends approval of drinking, was associated with an increased risk for late-onset AUD whereas retirement, death of spouse or close relative does not increase the risk for late-onset AUD. However, the data was insufficient to give a reliable quantification of these associations.DiscussionA common problem for the studies included (and the ones excluded as well) was the lack of common definitions of late-onset, “stress” and “traumatic life events”. This makes the results seem far removed from the participants, and is an area that is ripe for further research. Most of the research we have uncovered seems to be based on presumptions about how and why AUD occurs, and no special interest has been taken in uncovering what is intrinsically different between late-onset AUD and other kinds of AUD.",
keywords = "Alkohol, Alkohol Problemer, {\AE}ldre , Review",
author = "Jakob Emiliussen and Nielsen, {Anette S{\o}gaard} and Kjeld Andersen",
year = "2015",
month = "5",
day = "31",
language = "English",
note = "null ; Conference date: 31-05-2015 Through 04-06-2015",

}

Emiliussen, J, Nielsen, AS & Andersen, K 2015, 'Causes for Late onset Alcohol Use Disorder: a Critical Systematic Review.', International Conference of Treatment of Addictive Behaviour , Odense, Danmark, 31/05/2015 - 04/06/2015.

Causes for Late onset Alcohol Use Disorder : a Critical Systematic Review. / Emiliussen, Jakob ; Nielsen, Anette Søgaard; Andersen, Kjeld.

2015. Poster session præsenteret på International Conference of Treatment of Addictive Behaviour , Odense, Danmark.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskningpeer review

TY - CONF

T1 - Causes for Late onset Alcohol Use Disorder

T2 - a Critical Systematic Review.

AU - Emiliussen, Jakob

AU - Nielsen, Anette Søgaard

AU - Andersen, Kjeld

PY - 2015/5/31

Y1 - 2015/5/31

N2 - IntroductionOne subgroup among elderly with AUD is the “late-onset” abusers. Late-onset (60+ years) AUD seems to be a milder, more narrowly defined psychiatric problem, than early or midlife onset AUD. This review seeks to expand the description and understanding of late-onset AUD by reviewing the available literature on the subject.MethodA PRISMA style review and search was performed in late May 2014 and covered MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and PsychInfo. Inclusion was based on if the study had causes for late-onset AUD in their results section. This revealed 24 articles relevant for this study. After a full read and quality assessment, only eight studies were included in the final review.ResultsInherent differences in measurements, methodologies and outcome measures in the studies, made it impossible to do a meta-analysis. Instead, we performed a descriptive assessment of the results from the studies.The results of this review are generally inconclusive. In spite of the low quality scores, we did find that chronic stress, role/identity loss and friends approval of drinking, was associated with an increased risk for late-onset AUD whereas retirement, death of spouse or close relative does not increase the risk for late-onset AUD. However, the data was insufficient to give a reliable quantification of these associations.DiscussionA common problem for the studies included (and the ones excluded as well) was the lack of common definitions of late-onset, “stress” and “traumatic life events”. This makes the results seem far removed from the participants, and is an area that is ripe for further research. Most of the research we have uncovered seems to be based on presumptions about how and why AUD occurs, and no special interest has been taken in uncovering what is intrinsically different between late-onset AUD and other kinds of AUD.

AB - IntroductionOne subgroup among elderly with AUD is the “late-onset” abusers. Late-onset (60+ years) AUD seems to be a milder, more narrowly defined psychiatric problem, than early or midlife onset AUD. This review seeks to expand the description and understanding of late-onset AUD by reviewing the available literature on the subject.MethodA PRISMA style review and search was performed in late May 2014 and covered MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and PsychInfo. Inclusion was based on if the study had causes for late-onset AUD in their results section. This revealed 24 articles relevant for this study. After a full read and quality assessment, only eight studies were included in the final review.ResultsInherent differences in measurements, methodologies and outcome measures in the studies, made it impossible to do a meta-analysis. Instead, we performed a descriptive assessment of the results from the studies.The results of this review are generally inconclusive. In spite of the low quality scores, we did find that chronic stress, role/identity loss and friends approval of drinking, was associated with an increased risk for late-onset AUD whereas retirement, death of spouse or close relative does not increase the risk for late-onset AUD. However, the data was insufficient to give a reliable quantification of these associations.DiscussionA common problem for the studies included (and the ones excluded as well) was the lack of common definitions of late-onset, “stress” and “traumatic life events”. This makes the results seem far removed from the participants, and is an area that is ripe for further research. Most of the research we have uncovered seems to be based on presumptions about how and why AUD occurs, and no special interest has been taken in uncovering what is intrinsically different between late-onset AUD and other kinds of AUD.

KW - Alkohol

KW - Alkohol Problemer

KW - Ældre

KW - Review

UR - http://docplayer.net/5638209-The-13th-international-conference-on-treatment-of-addictive-behaviors.html

M3 - Poster

ER -

Emiliussen J, Nielsen AS, Andersen K. Causes for Late onset Alcohol Use Disorder: a Critical Systematic Review.. 2015. Poster session præsenteret på International Conference of Treatment of Addictive Behaviour , Odense, Danmark.